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Location: Paterson New Jersey

Descendants of Abraham Tappan of Newbury, MA

The Tappan family of Attleboro, while not an old one in this section of the State, has, nevertheless, been resident for half a century in Attleboro, where Ephraim H. Tappan makes his home, and where his sons, Charles H. and William C, the latter now deceased, have been identified with the manufacturing interests of that section, by their great energy, enterprise and progressive spirit making for themselves a name ranking them among the foremost jewelry manufacturers of the State. The Tappan family was planted in America by:

Abraham Toppan (or Tappan), son of William Topham, of Calbridge, in the parish of Coverham, and fourth in descent from Robert Topham, of Linton, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, England; he was baptized April 10, 1606. He lived for some time in Yarmouth, County of Norfolk. His wife, whose maiden name was Taylor, was born in 1607, daughter of Elizabeth, who married (second) John Goodale, whom she outlived and from whom she inherited considerable property. Mr. Toppan with his wife, two children and maidservant, in 1637, took passage in the “Mary and Ann” to New England, and there came in the same vessel with them Mrs. Goodale, his mother-in-law. He settled in Newbury, being admitted Oct. 16, 1637, and at different times in the year following several lots were granted to him. He made a number of voyages to Barbadoes, one or more of which were profitable. He died Nov. 5, 1672, aged sixty-six, in the house on “Toppan’s Lane” which he had built about 1670 for his son Jacob. His widow died March 20, 1689, aged eighty-two years. The children of Abraham and Susanna (Taylor) Toppan were:

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Biography of James Baxter

Captain James Baxter, of Boise, is a native of England, his birth having occurred in Norwich. His parents were Frank and Mary (Gunn) Baxter, who came with their family to the United States when the Captain was very young. They resided near New York City for some years, and then removed to Paterson, New Jersey. The father was a horticulturist by occupation and successfully engaged in the cultivation of vegetables and flowers. Soon after his arrival in America he took steps toward becoming naturalized and was recognized as a valued and influential citizen. He served as county commissioner in New Jersey for a number of years, and was also county sheriff, in which positions he discharged his duties with signal ability. After a residence of thirty years in America, he died at the age of seventy-eight. His widow still survives him, and at the age of eighty-seven years is living in Paterson, New Jersey, where she has so long made her home. She was the mother of thirteen children, seven of whom grew to years of maturity and are still living. In the public schools of New York City James Baxter began his education, which he continued in Paterson. Subsequently he attended the school of mines at Columbia College, New York, and was graduated there as a mining engineer and metallurgist. He learned the machinist’s trade with the Rogers...

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Biography of Samuel Brownlee Fisher

Samuel Brownlee Fisher of Parsons, consulting engineer of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad Company, is one of the eminent railway engineers of America. He had had nearly fifty years of active experience and had been identified with the construction of various railway lines in the West and East. He comes of an old Scotch family of Covenanter stock. On the maternal side his ancestors were the Brownlees, who were Covenanters in Scotland and were exiled because of their religious belief and settled in Pennsylvania. Mr. Fisher’s great-great-grandfather in the maternal line, George Wilie, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and another member of this same family was Colonel Thompson, an aide to General Washington. Mr. Fisher’s maternal grandfather, Samuel Brownlee, was born in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1792, and spent all his life on a farm in that rugged district of Southwestern Pennsylvania, dying in 1855. He was an active abolitionist in the days before the Civil war and was a member of the Associate Branch of the Presbyterian Church. Samuel Brownlee married Ann Wilie, who was born and died at Washington, Pennsylvania. The father of Mr. Fisher was Rev. Jacob P. Fisher, who was born in Ohio in 1808, but was reared and married in Washington, Pennsylvania. He was a minister of that branch of Presbyterianism formerly known as the Associate Church. He was also actively identified...

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Francis Harrison Todd of Paterson NJ

Francis Harrison Todd10, (Theron A.9, Alfred8, Albert7, Charles6, Jonah5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born July 29, 1874, married in Ottawa, Ont., Canada, April 25, 1900, Maude Isabelle Mitchell. He is a physician in Paterson, N. J., where his children were born. Children: 2799. Roberta Webster, b. Oct. 12, 1902. 2800. Frances Mitchell, b. July 26,...

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Biography of Frank Lyman Gold

FRANK LYMAN GOLD-A man of wide and varied activities, each of which he has carried on successfully after he had gained full knowledge of the field of business into which he was entering, the story of Frank Lyman Gold is full of interest. (I) He belongs to a notable old New England family, whose founder was Joseph Gold, born in London, England, who came to America when he was nineteen years old. According to family records, he served for seven years in the Revolutionary War, lived for a time in Northbury, Connecticut, and died in Roxbury, Vermont, in 1829. He married, in Northbury, Patience Goodenough, who died in 1826. One of his children, Joseph, is of further mention. (II) Joseph Gold, son of Joseph Gold, married, and his son, Miner, is of further mention. (III) Miner Gold, son of Joseph Gold, was born in Pelham, Massachusetts, in 1802, and died in Belchertown in May, 1882. He was a scholar, teacher, and good business man, and taught mathematics at Amherst College, besides writing an arithmetic text used in New England schools. Miner Gold married Olivia Conkey, who died in 1878, and among their children was a son, Theodore, of further mention. (IV) Theodore Gold, son of Miner and Olivia (Conkey) Gold, was born in Pelham, Massachusetts, in 1837, and died January 4, 1889. After his marriage he moved to Belchertown,...

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Aquackanonk Tribe

Aquackanonk Indians (from ach-quoa-k-kan-nonk, a place in a rapid stream where fishing is done with a bush-net. Nelson). A division of the Unami Delawares which occupied lands on Passaic River, New Jersey, and a considerable territory in the interior, including the tract known as Dundee, in Passaic, just below the Dundee Dam, in 1678. In 1679 the name was used to describe a tract in Saddle River Township, Bergen County, as well as to designate “the old territory, which included all of Paterson’s of the Passaic River, and the city of Paterson.” The Aquackanonk sold lands in 1676 and...

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Biography of John Brandt

John Brandt was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1828, and is of German descent, his great-grand parents having emigrated from Germany, and settled in Pennsylvania, in the early history of that State. His father, John Brandt, for several years was engaged in the manufacture of rifles for the United States Government at Lancaster, and was a man of great natural mechanical ability. When the first railroad in Pennsylvania, known as the Old State road, running from Philadelphia to Columbia, and now a part of the Pennsylvania railroad system, was completed, the managers secured a locomotive of English manufacture. This was in the infancy of railroad operations in America, and after repeated failures in putting this primitive locomotive in working order, Mr. Brandt was sent for and speedily accomplished the task. His quick perception of the mechanical principles involved, although. in an entirely new field of work, attracted considerable attention and he was soon after appointed master mechanic of the road, which at that time was operated by the State. He remained in this position some eight or ten years, and was then appointed to a similar position on the Cumberland Valley Railroad, and later as superintendent of the motor power and machinery of the New York & Erie Railroad. In 1851 was made superintendent of the New Jersey Locomotive Works, at Paterson, New Jersey, and in 1853 assisted...

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Biography of James Lotan

James Lotan was born in Paterson, New Jersey in 1843, and is of Irish descent, his father John Lotan, having been born in Ireland and emigrated to America in 1840. Until his twelfth year young Lotan attended the public schools of his native city. He then became an apprentice to the machinist trade in his uncle’s shop. After acquiring a full knowledge of his trade he went to Jacksonville, Florida, where with an elder brother he was employed until the war of the Rebellion began, when he returned home, and a few months thereafter, in May 1861, enlisted for two years in Company C, Ninth New York Volunteer Regiment, commanded by Col. Rush C. Hawkins. This regiment was first stationed at Fort Monroe and from there proceeded to Newport News, where it took part in a fight at Great Bethel, which resulted in one of the first victories for the Union army. It left Newport News, with Gen. Butler’s expedition and at Fort Hatteras joined Gen. Burnside’s command, proceeding with this division of the army up Pamlico Sound to Newbern, N. C., where it fought a battle. From this point it proceeded back to Roanoke Island and from there to Newbern, participating in the battle of South Mills and in numerous skirmishes along the line of March. From Newbern the regiment proceeded through the Dismal Swamps to Norfolk, Virginia,...

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