Location: Paris Tennessee

Letter from Thomas Love to his Nephew, James Robert Love

Letter from Thomas Love to his Nephew, James Robert Love, of Haywood County, North Carolina. Henry County, Paris, Tennessee. My Dear Nephew: 10 March 1843 I received your kind letter of the 23rd, Jan. 1843, which gave me much satisfaction to learn that my old and much beloved brother was still in the land of the living, and all friends in that County generally enjoying health. My family at present is in the enjoyment of reasonable health ever since you left me with the exception, of myself and Albert, who has not altogether recovered his health, but so much so that he attends to all his business. As to myself, I have been sorely afflicted with the Rheumatism pains in my neck for the last sixteen months, but for the last two or three weeks, I think, I have mended considerably, and if it should be the will of the Giver of all Good to continue His kind mercies towards me, and should my neck continue to improve, as it has done for the last two or three weeks, my intention is that, I think, sometime by the month of May, I will be able to ride in a carriage. My intention is at that time, or thereabouts, to set out for my old native country to see all my friends and relatives one more time. My son, Thomas...

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Slave Narrative of Alex & Elizabeth Smith

Interviewer: Henrietta Karwowski Person Interviewed: Mr. and Mrs. Alex Smith Location: South Bend, Indiana Age: 83 Place of Residence: 127 North Lake Street, South Bend, Indiana Henrietta Karwowski, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project St. Joseph County-District #1 South Bend, Indiana EX-SLAVES MR. AND MRS. ALEX SMITH 127 North Lake Street South Bend, Indiana Mr. and Mrs. Alex Smith, an eighty-three year old negro couple were slaves in Kentucky near Paris, Tennessee, as children. They now reside at 127 North Lake Street, on the western limits of South Bend. This couple lives in a little shack patched up with tar paper, tin, and wood. Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, the talkative member or the family is a small woman, very wrinkled, with a stocking cap pulled over her gray hair. She wore a dress made of three different print materials; sleeves of one kind, collar of another and body of a third. Her front teeth were discolored, brown stubs, which suggested that she chews tobacco. Mr. Alex Smith, the husband is tall, though probably he was a well built man at one time. He gets around by means of a cane. Mrs. Smith said that he is not at all well, and he was in the hospital for six weeks last winter. The wife, Elizabeth or Betty, as her husband calls her, was a slave on the Peter Stubblefield plantation in Kentucky,...

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Slave Narrative of Adeline R. Lennox

Interviewer: Albert Strope Person Interviewed: Adeline Rose Lennox Location: Elkhart, Indiana Place of Birth: Middle / Paris, Tennessee Date of Birth: October 25, 1849 Place of Residence: 1400 South Sixth Street, Elkhart, Indiana Albert Strope, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project St. Joseph County-District #1 Mishawaka, Indiana ADELINE ROSE LENNOX-EX-SLAVE 1400 South Sixth Street, Elkhart, Indiana Adeline Rose Lennox was born of slave parents at Middle-sometimes known as Paris-Tennessee, October 25, 1849. She lived with her parents in slave quarters on the plantation of a Mr. Rose for whom her parents worked. These quarters were log houses, a distance from the master’s mansion. At the age of seven years, Adeline was taken from her parents to work at the home of a son of Mr. Rose who had recently been married. She remembers well being taken away, for she said she cried, but her new mistress said she was going to have a new home so she had to go with her. At the age of fourteen years she did the work of a man in the field, driving a team, plowing, harrowing and seeding. “We all thought a great deal of Mr. Rose,” said Mrs. Lennox, “for he was good to us.” She said that they were well fed, having plenty of corn, peas, beans, and pork to eat, more pork then than now. As Adeline Rose, the subject...

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Biography of Thaddeus Constantine Frazier, M. D.

Thaddeus Constantine Frazier, M. D. A useful life crowded with activity and crowned with achievement both as a physician and as a citizen, Dr. Thaddeus C. Frazier, of Coffeyville, may still further be considered because he is the pioneer medical man of this city. For forty-two years he has been a physician and surgeon here and additionally has been a leader in all forward movements, accepting public positions as a helpful means of progress for the city, encouraging educational movements and through his stability of character conferring honor upon this whole section. Doctor Frazier was born in Henry County, Tennessee, December 14, 1841. His parents were William and Judith Ann (Sheb) Frazier. The Fraziers were of Scotch extraction but the founders of the American branch came from the North of Ireland and settled in Virginia and North Carolina in colonial days. The grandfather of Doctor Frazier, Julian Frazier, was born in North Carolina. He removed to Tennessee where he subsequently died leaving a large estate to his children. He had been an influential man in politics and at one time served as a member of the Tennessee Legislature. William Frazier, father of Doctor Frazier, was born in North Carolina, in 1812, and died at Wichita, Kansas, in 1895. He married Judith Ann Sheb, who was born in Henry County, Tennessee, in 1815, and died there in 1845. They were...

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