Location: Paris Illinois

Biographical Sketch of George White

George White, the well known implement dealer and auctioneer of Newman, was born near Glasgow, Barren County, Kentucky, August 18, 1842, and is a son of M. L. and Mary (Biby) White. Middleton White was born in Barren County, Kentucky and moved to Edgar County, Illinois, where he was married. His wife was also from near Glasgow. Kentucky. ‘They are both dead and buried in the Paris cemetery. George White came to Newman and located in business in about 1874, since which time his business has steadily grown until he is known as one of the most successful and extensive implement dealers in the entire County. He also handles the Mitchell wagon and several makes of buggies and carriages. His sales run from $25,000 to $35,000 annually. In 1844 Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss Della Clark, who is a native of Kentucky. They have two children: Henry W., who will graduate from the Chicago Homeopathic School of Medicine in March, 1901, and Fred, who is in business with his father. George White has here held the office of township supervisor and while he resided in Edgar County held the same office. In 1861 he volunteered in Company E, Twelfth Illinois Infantry and served through the entire Civil war. During the month of February especially his services are in great demand as a public auctioneer. He is...

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Biography of Rev. William E. Means

Rev. William E. Means, proprietor of the Atwood Herald, was born at Paris, Edgar county, Illinois, June 28, 1850. He attended the district school during the winter, working on prepared to enter Paris high school. In 1874 he matriculated at the Northwestern University, and was graduated from the theological department of this well-known institution in the farm (luring the summer months, until the class of 1879. After graduation he was admitted to the Minnesota conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was appointed pastor of the Rushmore charge, where a hand-some four-thousand-dollar church was built, free from debt. In the middle of the second year he was appointed to Lu Verne, where the church was greatly blessed during his labors with a sweeping revival, the church completed, and the way prepared for the paying- off of a crushing debt. Finding the Minnesota winters colder than he liked, he found an opportunity, in the spring of 1884, to transfer to South Kansas conference, where during the year he was instrumental in building two places of worship, a temporary building in Fort Scott, Kansas, which afterward became Grace church, and a beautiful village church at Hiattville, Kansas. The two years following were spent at Moran, Kansas, and were very fruitful. More than a hundred were gathered into the church, and the church thoroughly organized. A pastorate of three and a half...

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Biography of Oliver O. Hockett

Oliver O. Hockett, one of the younger members of the medical fraternity of Douglas County, and one of the leading men in the social, professional and educational life of Newman, was born in Paris, Edgar County, Illinois, March 2, 1866. He was graduated from the high school of Paris in 1882 and subsequently entered the state university at Champaign, where he remained for three years. He then took up the study of medicine with Dr. M. P. Smith, with whom he remained until he entered Chicago Hahnemann College, from which well known institution he was graduated in the class of 1880, and the following year he spent in the Hahnemann hospital. In March, 1890, he came to Newman and opened out in the general practice of medicine, and has succeeded far beyond his expectations. He is skilled and successful, and although having been in Newman but a few years, he enjoys one of the most extensive and lucrative practices in the County. He is a member of the Hahnemann Medical Society, contributes to the medical journals and keeps himself thoroughly in touch with the advancements being made in his profession. As a diagnostician in his profession, as well as in his judgment of human nature, he would pass muster in any community. Dr. Hockett is a son of Mahlon and Mary (Kimble) Hockett, natives of Vermilion and Edgar counties...

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Biography of P. A. Kemper, M. D.

P. A. Kemper, M. D., physician and surgeon, Mattoon; was born in Culpeper Co., Va., Aug. 31, 1832; his early education was under the direct supervision of his mother, who was a well-qualified schoolmistress; his father was an artisan by profession, of whom he was bereft at the early age of 8 years; when about 16 years of age, he left home and came to Paris, Edgar Co., Ill.; in the fall of 1855, he began the study of his profession with Dr. D. O. McCord, remaining in his office two and a half years; during the winter of 1857 and 1858, he attended Rush Medical College, and, at a later date, received his degree; He began the practice of his profession in Pleasant Grove Tp., Coles Co., March 3, 1858; here he remained until 1876, excepting an absence of two years in the army. In 1861, he raised a company for the 5th Regiment, and was chosen Captain of the same; his position he resigned for that of Assistant Surgeon of the regiment; when the final organization occurred, however, through the treachery of professed friends, he failed in receiving the appointment; notwithstanding the unjust treatment to himself and Col. Updegraff, the commanding officer, he elected to remain with his boys, as a private in the ranks, rather than return home; in June, 1862, he was captured at Pocahontas,...

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Biographical Sketch of Theodore Jonte

Theodore Jonte, dealer in harness and saddles, Mattoon; was born in Nashville, Tenn., April 4, 1839; his father was a wholesale confectioner; he received a good common-school education, and, at the age of 16 years, left home and came West, settling in Quincy, Ill., where he engaged in working at his trade; in the fall of 1861, he engaged in laboring for the U. S. Government in the making of cavalry equipments; the fall of 1862, he came to Paris, Edgar Co., and engaged in business with Wm. Legy; they operated a shop in Paris, and one in Grand View at the same time; Mr. Jonte had charge of the latter; in the fall of 1864, he removed to Mattoon, and opened up his present business; his is the only first-class establishment in the city. He was married in 1865 to Anna Stone-burner, a native of Grand View, Ill.; has one child-Alberta. Owns considerable real estate in the city. In 1876, he was chosen City Mayor; is at present Assistant Supervisor of Mattoon Tp.; also a member of the Board of Education, West...

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Biography of Mary M. (Lamb) Shelden Mrs.

Mrs. Mary M. (Lamb) Shelden. Among the interesting names belonging to El Dorado is that of Shelden, which since 1874 had been identified with civic progress, advancement and education here. The late Alvah Shelden, who for thirty years was owner and editor of the Walnut Valley Times, was one of the best known of Butler County’s citizens and did much to encourage development and a high form of government, and is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary M. (Lamb) Shelden, who is widely and favorably known because of her activities, particularly in connection with El Dorado’s library. Mrs. Shelden was born at Troy, Geauga County, Ohio, April 19, 1856, and is a daughter of Chester and Anne (Crook) Lamb. The family originated in the State of New York, and it is probable that the family was founded there by the grandfather of Mrs. Shelden, a native of England. Chester Lamb was born in the Empire State, in 1816, and, being left an orphan at the age of nine years, went to Troy, Ohio, where he was reared in the family of his uncle, Gayland Lamb. Mr. Lamb received an ordinary public school education and adopted farming and stockraising as his vocation in life, and gradually developed into a breeder of registered horses, eventually acquiring much more than a local reputation as a breeder of race horses. In 1869, with...

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Biographical Sketch of M. E. O’Hair

M. E. O’Hair, farming and stock; P. O. Charleston; was born in Morgan Co., Ky., Feb. 22, 1829. He married Miss Catharine R. Zink June 6, 1856; she was born in Edgar Co., Ill., and died Dec. 7, 1873; they had six children, viz., Calvin L., Laura B., Nettie T., Harvey Z., Gladys V. and Alvaretta C. He married his present wife, Miss Sarah E. Bryant, Oct. 14, 1875; she was born in Edgar Co., Ill., July 29, 1852; they have two children, viz., Charles H. and Francina D. He lived in Kentucky until he was 13 years old, when, with his parents, he came to Illinois, and settled in Edgar Co., where he lived until he became of age, when he went to California, his object being to mine; he remained two years, meeting with fair success; in 1852, he returned to his home in Edgar Co., and engaged in the stock business; in 1853, he bought part of his present place. and settled and improved the same; in 1857, he removed to the village of Kansas, in Edgar Co., Ill., and engaged in the general merchandise business, which he continued about four years; in 1860, he moved to Paris, and served as Sheriff of Edgar Co. for two years; he was then appointed Deputy Sheriff, and served two years, and, in 1865, he returned to his present...

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Biography of J. T. Moore

J. T. Moore is one of the publishers of the Pittsburg Headlight, one of the oldest and most influential daily and weekly newspapers in Southern Kansas. The Headlight had been continuously under the direction of members of the Moore family for over thirty years. Mr. Moore, besides his publication interests, is directly connected with several of the leading industrial organizations of Pittsburg and vicinity. He was born at Paris, Illinois, May 11, 1865. His father, the later William Moore, was a veteran printer, editor and newspaper publisher, and left his impress on a number of cities in the Middle West. He was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1819, and died in Pittsburg, Kansas, in 1904. Spending his early youth in Allentown, he afterwards went west to Iowa, and for a number of years was located at Vincennes, Indiana, where he married. Having learned the printer’s trade as a youth, he was connected with various newspapers and printing establishments in many communities. At Terre Haute, Indiana, whither he removed from Vincennes, he published the first daily paper of that city, and in fact it was one of the early dailies in the Middle West. About 1855, removing to Paris, Illinois, he purchased the Paris Beacon. William Moore left Illinois about 1884, and coming to Kansas first located for a brief time at Emporia, and then became publisher of the Americus...

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Biography of Marion P. Cash

Marion P. Cash, traveling salesman; P. O. Terre Haute, Ind.; born in Nelson Co. Va., April 14, 1833, he removed to Amherst Co., with the family, when 4 years of age, where he lived until 14 years of age, when he emigrated to Illinois and located in Paris, Edgar Co., in the fall of 1847; after farming one year, he learned and worked at the cabinet-maker’s trade for three years, in Paris; he came to Oakland, Coles Co., and worked one year at his trade, when he engaged with his brother in the furniture trade for two years; he then sold out and engaged in the drug trade one year; in 1855, he was appointed Postmaster of Oakland, at which date he engaged in the grocery and confectionery trade, which he continued until 1857, when he sold out and again engaged in the furniture business until 1861, when he removed to Westfield, Clark Co., and managed the merchandise trade of H. H. Cash & Bro., until 1863; he then engaged as traveling salesman for a wholesale notion house at Terre Haute one year; he then went to Cincinnati and engaged in the same business until 1867, when he bought out a dry goods store at Kansas Station, which he ran until 180, when, selling out, he again engaged as traveling salesman, which business he continued until 1877, for Terre...

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Biography of L. S. Cash

L. S. Cash, merchant, farmer and stock-raiser, Oakland; born in Nelson Co., Va., Jan. 12, 1827, where he attended school until 10 years of age, when, upon his father’s decease, he removed to Amherst Co., where he attended school and engaged in farming until 1847, when he, with the family, emigrated West, and located in Paris, Ill., in October, of the same year; during the December following, he buried his mother and two older brothers within a period of ten days; he learned and worked at the plasterer’s trade here for two years, when, in March, 1850, he started overland, with an ox-team, for California, taking the old Oregon route, via Fort Hall, and, on August 18, of the same year, he arrived at the Placerville diggings, where he remained a short time; then to Sumner River, then to North Greenwood Valley; during the winter and the spring following, he went twenty-five miles south of Placerville to Dry Creek, where, meeting with fair success, he remained until his return home, sailing upon June 1, 1853; coming via New York, he arrived in Paris, Ill., July 1, making the trip in thirty days; he then located in Oakland, where he worked at the plasterer’s trade until 1856, when he engaged in the dry goods trade, with his brother, under the firm name of L. S. & S. M. Cash, which...

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Biography of S. M. Cash

S. M. Cash, merchant, deceased; born in Nelson Co., Va., March 13, 1829, where he lived until 8 years of age, when he removed to Amherst Co., where he attended school and engaged in flaming until 16 years of age, after which time he was engaged for eighteen months at Lexington -learning the cabinet-maker’s trade; then coming West he located in Paris, Edgar Co., Ill., in the fall of 1847, where he completed his trade, when he associated with his brother Henry, and located in Westfield, Clark Co., where they engaged in the furniture trade from 1849 until the spring of 1851, when he located at Oakland, where he engaged in the furniture business until 1856; at which time he associated with his brother, L. S. Cash, in the dry goods trade, which business he continued in connection with farming, stock-raising and shipping until his death, which occurred April 12, 1877; in the spring of 1869, their store with its contents was destroyed by fire, by which they met with a loss of upward of $8,000 above insurance; they at once erected a fine brick store, into which they moved, and the surviving partner still continues the business under the old firm name. His marriage with Adeline Crawford was celebrated April 18, 1850; she was born in Butler Co., Ohio, April 17, 1831; eight children were the fruit of...

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Biography of Jacob I. Brown

Jacob I. Brown, Justice of the Peace, Charleston; a sun of John and Rachel Brown; born Oct. 12, 1819, near Jonesboro, Washington Co., Tenn.; his parents afterward removed to Wayne Co., Ind., but soon returned to Tennessee; their next move was to the White Water River, where his father and eight brothers and sisters died of yellow fever inside of a few months. His mother soon afterward removed with her remaining children, consisting of three sons and one daughter, to Bloomington, Ind. In 1832 or 1833, he went to learn the printing business, and worked for different parties till 1840, when he came on foot to Paris, Ill., and bought the Minas Statesman printing office, and began the publication of a Democratic newspaper; in 1844, he moved the office to Charleston, and started a paper called the Investigator, in connection with which he published a religious periodical, edited by Rev. Richard Newport. In 1845, he was elected Assessor for the county. He was married June 24, 1845, to Miss Ann E. Javins, who was born near Alexandria, Va., and after the death of her father removed with her mother to Vincennes, Ind., and after her mother’s death, came to Charleston, and resided in the family of her uncle, Albert Compton. In 1846 or 1847, in company with W. D. Latshaw, he began the publication of the Illinois Globe, Democratic...

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Biographical Sketch of A. F. Shaw

A. F. Shaw, Police Magistrate, Charleston; is a native of Illinois; he was born in Paris, Edgar Co., Feb. 10, 1824; he is a son of Smith and Elizabeth Shaw; his father was born in North Carolina; was raised in South Carolina, and when a young man, emigrated to Tennessee, and from there to Kentucky; he was one of the pioneers of Missouri, from which State he was several times driven by the Indians; he afterward came to Illinois, long prior to its admission as a State, and finally, in 1822, settled in Paris, where he died about sixteen years later; Mr. Shaw learned the saddler’s trade at the age of 15, and followed it till the breaking-out of the Mexican war; he then volunteered in Col. Baker’s 4th I. V. I., and was elected 2d Lieutenant of Co. H; he marched with Gen. Taylor’s army through Mexico, from Matamoras to Tampico, and afterward participated in the siege of Vera Cruz and the battle of Cerro Gordo; returning at the end of a year’s service, he engaged in business in Paris. In 1850, he crossed the plains to California, and engaged in mining; on his return, three years later, he went to Carthage, Hancock Co., Ill., where he carried on the saddlery business till 1856. He was married in May, 1854, to Miss Lucy A. Bunnell, a daughter of...

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Biography of Hon. H. A. Neal

Hon. H. A. Neal, attorney at law, Charleston; is a native of’ New Hampshire; he was born in Tuftonborough, Carroll Co., Dec. 13, 1846; he was raised on a farm until he was ten years of age, and then his parents removed to Great Falls, N. H.; he attended the public schools of that city until 1863, when the family returned to the farm; in the fall of 1864, he entered the army as a member of Co. K, 18t N. H. Heavy Artillery, and served till the close of the war; on his return, he attended one term in the Academy at Effingham, N. H., and the following winter taught a country school; in the spring of 1866, he went to Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and pursued a commercial course of study in Eastman’s Business College, where he graduated in September following; he at once came West, and engaged in teaching in Coles Co.; the next year, he became Principal of the Grammar School in. Paris, and, in 1868, went to Watseka, Iroquois Co., Ill., where he had charge of the public schools for three years; the winters of 1871 and 1872, he spent in the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, reading during vacations in the office of Wiley & Parker, in Charleston; he was admitted to the bar in June, 1873, and began...

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Biography of Rev. Stephen J. Bovell

Rev. Stephen J. Bovell, Pastor of the Presbyterian Church, Ashmore; was born in Washington Co., East Tenn, May 27, 1827. His father, Rev. J. V. Bovell, was a native of Virginia; removed to Tennessee at an early age; graduated at Washington College at the age of 20 years, and, when 26 years old, became President of that institution, and occupied the position three years. In June, 1829, he received a call to the Presbyterian Church, in Paris, Ill., and removed to that place, where he died but a few months afterward, leaving a wife and four children; Mr. Bovell’s mother, Christiana Gray Bovell, was a native of Tennessee, and now resides with her son; in 1835, the mother, with her family, removed to Coles Co., near Charleston; Mr. Bovell remained on the farm until the age of 20, then, in 1847, returned to Paris, where he spent two years as a student in the Edgar Academy, then under the control of Rev. H. R. Venable. In 1849, he entered Hanover College, where he graduated in 1852; he then went to Mississippi and engaged in teaching, but at the end of one year, he received an attack of paralysis, which disabled him from work for a year and a half; in the fall of 1854, he entered the New Albany Theological Seminary, where he spent one year, when, owing to...

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