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Location: Oxford Ohio

Biography of Rev. John A. Anderson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Rev. John A. Anderson, so long identified with the work of the Presbyterian Church at Junction City, and, while a resident of that place, with the affairs of Congress, of which he was a member, had a remarkable experience for a elergyman. He graduated from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1853, Benjamin Harrison being his roommate for a time. Mr. Anderson began his ministerial work at Stockton, California, in 1857, and is said to have preached the first union sermon on the Pacific coast. In 1860 the state legislature of California elected him trustee of the state insane asylum. Two years later he was appointed chaplain of the Third California Infantry, and in that capacity he accompanied General Connor’s expedition to Salt Lake City. As correspondent and agent of the United States Sanitary Commission for California his first duty was to act as relief agent of the Twelfth army corps. He was next transferred to the central office at New York. In 1864, when General Grant began moving toward Richmond, Mr. Anderson was made superintendent of transportation and had charge of six steamboats. At the close of the campaign he served as assistant superintendent of the canvas and supply department at Philadelphia and edited a paper ealled the Sanitary Commission Bulletin. When the war closed he...

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Slave Narrative of Peter Bruner

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Evelyn McLemore Person Interviewed: Peter Bruner Date of Interview: 1936 Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co. Date of Birth: 1845 ESTILL CO. (Evelyn McLemore) Story of Peter Bruner, a former slave: Peter Bruner, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co., in 1845. His master was John Bell Bruner, who at that time treated him fairly well. When Peter was 10 years of age his master brought him and his sister to Irvine. After arriving in Irvine, Peter’s master was very cruel to him. They got only cornbread, fat meat and water to eat. If his master’s hunger was not satisfied, he would even take this little from them. The[TR:?] were tables to eat from. Once Peter, was taken into his master’s house to nurse the children and was made to sleep on the floor with only a ragged quilt to lie on and one thin one over him. Often he was whipped because his mistress said the washing was not clean, when it was. On one occasion when he was beaten his master took a piece of sole leather about 1 foot long and 2 inches wide, cut it full of holes and dipped it in water that was brined. He then took the leather and lashed the poor slave’s back. Joe...

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Slave Narrative of Reverend Williams

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Rev. Williams Location: Lebanon, Ohio Place of Birth: Greenbriar County, West Virginia Date of Birth: 1859 Age: 76 Occupation: Methodist minister Miriam Logan Lebanon, Ohio July 8th Warren County, District 2 Story of REVEREND WILLIAMS, Aged 76, Colored Methodist Minister, Born Greenbriar County, West Virginia (Born 1859) “I was born on the estate of Miss Frances Cree, my mother’s mistress. She had set my grandmother Delilah free with her sixteen children, so my mother was free when I was born, but my father was not. “My father was butler to General Davis, nephew of Jefferson Davis. General Davis was wounded in the Civil War and came home to die. My father, Allen Williams was not free until the Emancipation.” “Grandmother Delilah belonged to Dr. Cree. Upon his death and the division of his estate, his maiden daughter came into possession of my grandmother, you understand. Miss Frances nor her brother Mr. Cam. ever married. Miss Frances was very religious, a Methodist, and she believed Grandmother Delilah should be free, and that we colored children should have schooling.” “Yes ma’m, we colored people had a church down there in West Virginia, and grandmother Delilah had a family Bible of her own. She had fourteen boys and two girls. My mother had sixteen...

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Biography of William M. Brown, M. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The medical fraternity is ably represented by Dr. William M. Brown, who is the leading physician of Cuprum, whither he removed in June of the present year, 1899, from Salubria, where he had continuously and successfully engaged in practice from June 1892. He was born in Preble County, Ohio, on the 18th of November, 1860. His ancestors were early settlers of South Carolina, and his grandfather, James Brown, was born in Due West, that state. James Scott Brown, the Doctor’s father, was a native of Preble County, Ohio, and having arrived at man’s estate he married Miss Julia Robertson, of Brighton, Iowa, who was born at Spring Hill, Indiana. He spent his entire life, however, near the old homestead where his birth occurred, and was an industrious, prosperous and honorable farmer. He and his wife were valued members of the United Presbyterian Church and exemplified in their daily lives their religious belief. Dr. Brown, the eldest in their family of nine children, eight of whom are yet living, was liberally educated and thus fitted for the responsible duties of life. Having attended the public schools of the Buckeye state, he further continued his studies in the university at Oxford, Ohio, and in Mommouth College, at Monmouth, Illinois. He was graduated in the Miami Medical College of...

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Biography of Bertha Louise Ahrens

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Bertha Louise Ahrens (B. Feb. 26, 1857), missionary teacher among the Choctaw Freedmen of Indian Territory since 1885, and principal teacher at Oak Hill Academy, 1905-1911, is a native of Berlin, Prussia. Her parents, Otto and Augusta Ahrens, in 1865, when she was 8, and a brother Otto 5, came to America and located on a farm near Sigourney, Iowa, after one year at Bellville, Illinois; and four, at Harper, Iowa. The schools and Churches first attended used the German language. Her first studies in English were in the graded schools at Sigourney and here at seventeen, she became a member of the Presbyterian Church under the pastorate of Rev. S. G. Hair. He loaned her some missionary literature to read and it awakened a desire on her part to become a missionary. This desire was expressed to the Women’s Missionary society of the Church and she was encouraged to attend the Western Female Seminary, now college, at Oxford, Ohio. After a course of study at this institution she enjoyed a year’s training in the Bible school connected with Moody’s Chicago Avenue Church, Chicago. During the next year, after hearing in her home town an appeal in behalf of a Negro school in the south, she was led to offer her services to the Presbyterian Board...

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Biography of Harlan P. Ustick, A. M., M. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The medical profession in Boise is ably represented by Dr. Harlan Page Ustick, a prominent homeopathic physician, who was born in Fayette county, Ohio, on the 26th of November, 1848. His paternal grandfather was a Baptist minister, who, leaving his home in France, crossed the Atlantic to New York City, where he passed the residue of his days. His son, William Arnold Ustick, the father of the Doctor, was born in Orange County. New York, in the year 1800, and when seventeen years of age removed to Ohio, where he resided until he laid down the burdens of life, in his ninetieth year. He married Miss Mary Stewart, a native of Maryland, and a descendant of the royal house of Stuart, of England. Mr. Ustick resided upon a farm and was accounted one of the industrious and practical agriculturists of his community. In later years he also engaged in buying and selling wool on an extensive scale, and won success in his undertakings. For many years he was an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and his life was actuated by noble principles and characterized by kindly deeds. Uncompromisingly opposed to oppression of every form, his home became a station on the famous Underground Railroad in antebellum days, and he aided many a poor Negro on his...

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Biographical Sketch of John Moreland Henderson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Henderson, John Moreland; lawyer; born, Newville, O., April 14, 1840; son of James T. and Ann Moreland Henderson; graduate Miami University, 1862; married, College Hill, O., June 20, 1872; seven children; member law firm of Henderson, Quail &...

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Roxa Ann Todd Boies of Homer NY

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now BOIES, Roxa Ann Todd6, (Amos5, Charles4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born March 12, 1795, married April 21, 1813, Chester Boies, of Blanford, Mass., who was born Oct. 2, 1789, died Aug. 5, 1856; he was a farmer and lived at Homer, N. Y., then Oxford, Medina and Lyme, Ohio. Children: I. William Phelps, b. Aug. 8, 1815. II. Ann Maria, b. Nov. 1, 1816, d. Oct. 5, 1826. III. Caroline Eliza, b. June 6, 1818, d. Oct. 19, 1848, m. Ten Eyck Wells, who was a physician at one time at Litchfield, Conn. They had one son born in 1844, d. in 1845. IV. Samuel, b. Feb. 2, 1820. V. Joseph Strong, b. Feb. 8, 1824. VI. Mary Campbell, b. March 23, 1826, m. Benjamin L. Bullard, of Wadsworth, Ohio. VII. Chester Leroy, b. May 5, 1828. VIII. Amos Todd, b. June 5, 1832. IX. Charlotte Maria, b. Dec. 25, 1834, d. Feb. 17, 1863, m. Charles Ozias Scott, who was a physician at Barnesville, Ohio. X. Harriet Lucretia, b. Nov. 17, 1836, m. Oct. 4, 1865, Elbridge Gerry, son of Cyrus and Lydia Hart; he was a physician at Medina, Ohio. No...

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