Location: Oxford County ME

Fryeburg Horse Railroad

This company was chartered in March 1887, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining a horse railroad in the village and to run to the Chautauqua grounds. It was at once organized and $5075 capital stock issued, which was taken by thirty stockholders. The road was installed and equipped that season, opened July 25, but did not run regularly until the following year. This road has remained under the general management of Seth W . Fife, and has been in operation each year since it begun. A total of 12,000 persons are sometimes carried annually during the running season, from June to October. Three miles of road are laid. This is the only horse railroad in the state. Four years ago this road was sold to the White Mountain Paper Co. who sold to the Pater Publishing Co. three years later. A charter granted by the last legislature provides for the extension of this road to Stow and Lovell, and it is probable that one or both of these places will soon be reached by a new line of road to be operated by horses or electricity. The plan for a road to Lovell was contemplated by the original promoters, but was not executed before disposing of the...

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The Maine Indians

Before the encroachment of pale faced settlers, the entire valley of the Saco and its tributaries was peopled by the numerous Sokokis Indians. These were considered the parent tribe of the Abenaki Nation, which at one time peopled the whole of Maine. One of the most eloquent and statesmanlike of their chiefs once said in council, “We received our lands from the Great Father of Life; we hold only from Him.” Their title was unquestionable and unmolested, they roamed the valley from their village at the Lower Falls (Saco) to the settlement on the great bend, on the intervales of Fryeburg. These were in many respects a noble race of red men, evincing unmistakable evidence of having descended from a higher state, and still retained a fine sense of honor and personal dignity. The Sokokis tribe 1Saco Valley Settlements and Families. was once so numerous that they could call nine hundred warriors to arms, but war and pestilence reduced their number to a, mere handful.1 The residence of the sagamores was on Indian Island, above the lower falls. Among the names of the chiefs who dwelt hereabout were those of Capt. Sunday, the two Heagons, and Squando who succeeded Fluellen. For some years these Indians lived with the white settlers in peace and quietness, some of them acquiring a fair knowledge of the English language by their intercourse. When...

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The Pequawket Expedition

On April 16, the company bade farewell to their friends and kindred in Dunstable, Mass., the home of many of the party, and proceeded to Contoocook, and to the west shore of Ossipee Lake. Here they halted and erected a fort which should serve as a rallying point and base of supplies. By this time two men had become disabled. One had returned home accompanied by a friend, Benj. Kidder was left at the fort, with the surgeon and a guard of eight. The remaining thirty-four men took up the trail to Pequawket with good courage. On Tuesday, two days before the battle, the party were suspicious that they had been discovered by the enemy, and on Friday night the guard heard them creeping through the underbrush about their encampment. At an early hour Saturday morning, May 8th, while they were yet at their devotions, the report of a gun was heard, and soon an Indian was seen standing upon a point of land extending into Saco (now Lovewell’s) pond. They supposed this was a decoy, to draw them into ambush. A conference was immediately held to determine what course to pursue. The men were anxious for an engagement, but Capt. Lovewell seems to have assented against his wishes. They prepared for action. Assuming that the foe was still in front he ordered the men to lay down their...

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Bridges, Canal, Post Offices of Fryeburg, Maine

Dea. Richard Eastman operated a ferry for many years near the point where the toll bridge was erected in 1870; this bridge is 76 feet long, being the shortest of the seven bridges which span the Saco and Canal. The first bridge built was at Swan’s Falls about 1780. The oldest now in use is Weston’s bridge, 250 feet long, built in 1844, according to Wm. Gordon. Canal bridge 272 feet long, was built in 1846; Walker’s bridge 164 feet, in 1848; Charles river bridge (a tributary) 87 feet, in 1856; Island bridge, 110 feet, in 1862; Hemlock bridge 116, in 1867; the Toll bridge (now free), in 1870; and the new iron bridge at the Harbor 80 feet, built in 1894. All except the latter are covered. The canal was begun in 1812, when a narrow channel was cut. The freshet of 1820 greatly widened the channel, reduced the length of the Saco in town from 36 miles to 24 miles, and draining an extensive area of valuable arable land. Fryeburg post office was established Jan. 1, 1798, with Moses Ames, postmaster. The post office at the Center was established Feb. 19, 1833, Henry G. Farrington, P. M. West Fryeburg post office was established in July 1887, Mrs. E. P. Hutchins,...

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West Oxford Agricultural Association

The WEST OXFORD AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION AND FAIR was organized and established in 1851. For over half a century this has been an important factor in the life and social and commercial developement of a wide...

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Fryeburg Water Works

In 1882, the Fryeburg Water Co. was organized by local citizens under the direction of Dr. D. Lamson Lowell, for the purpose of installing a system for supplying pure water from Green Hill mountain in Conway. There a series of boiling springs was dammed back, forming a reservoir covering about an acre less than three miles from the village. A system of 10, 8, and 6 inch pipe conducts the water to the village, 156 feet below, the pipe passing under the Saco 300 feet below Weston’s bridge. A natural force of 65 pounds is produced giving ample fire protection and a clear, pure water supply for family use. H. B. Cotton is president of the company; A. R. Jenness, Sec., Treas., and...

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Act of Incorporation – Organization of Fryeburg, Maine

In the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy six. An Act for erecting a Tract of Land Coold Fryeburg of two thousand one hundred and seventy two Rods square Lying in the County of York, which was granted as a Township to Joseph Frye, Esq., Anno Domoni seventeen hundred sixty-two and Confirmed Anno Domoni seventeen hundred sixty-three into a town by the name of Fryeburg. Whereas the Inhabitance of that tract of Land Consisting of Proprietors & non Proprietors Promiscuously settled thereon Having lately been united in ordaining a Minister of the Gospel among them, are Desirous of a unity in the Expense of his Support of Building a Meeting House and other Public Charges of the place, but Cannot Lay a Tax upon themselves for those Purposes till said Tract of Land is incorporated into a Town. Therefore be it enacted by the Council and House of Representatives in General Court Assembled and by the Authority of the same that the aforesaid Tract of Land originally Bounded as Followeth viz: at the South Corner to a Spruce Tree marked thence running (?) North forty-five Degrees west, (by the needal) two thousand one hundred and seventy-two Rods to a Beach Tree marked thence North forty-five Degrees East, two thousand one hundred and seventy-two Rods to a Maple Tree marked thence south forty-five Degrees East, two...

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, William

Allen, William, son of William Allen, was born at Brunswick, Cumberland County, Maine, March 31, 1822. He is a grandson of the Rev. Thomas Allen, the “fighting parson” of the noted Berkshire militia, who performed such conspicuous service under General Stark of Revolutionary fame. His father was a clergyman of Pittsfield, a scholar of eminence, and at one time president of Bowdoin College. After obtaining his preliminary education at the public schools, Mr. Allen fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, and at the North Yarmouth Academy, in Maine, and entered Bowdoin College in 1834. After a few months spent at Bowdoin he went to Amherst, where he graduated in 1842. He began the study of law at the Yale law school, continuing it later at Northampton, where he was admitted to the bar in 1845, and where he has since resided. In 1880 Mr. Allen was made associate justice of the superior court, which high office he now holds, abundantly justifying the judicious selection of Governor Long, to whom he was indebted for the...

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Biography of F. H. Penley

Fortunate is the community which had citizens with the substantial conservatism of practical business men and yet are forward looking in matters of new development and improvement. In the matter of towns and communities there is perhaps more truth in Ingalls’ statement that opportunity knocks but once at the door, than in its application to individuals. Recently the oil district of Southern Kansas was extended into Butler County. By the good sense and public spirit of several local citizens, prominent among whom is F. H. Penley, president of the First National Bank of Augusta, this sudden development of great natural wealth and resources was utilized to the distinct advantage of what had been merely a country village, and Augusta is now on a fair way to become one of the thriving centers of population and industry in the state. Mr. Penley represents a pioneer family in Butler County and he had been personally identified with the business and civic life of this section of Kansas for forty years. He came to Kansas when a boy. He was born in the State of Maine at Bethel in Oxford County in 1856. His parents, Charles Freeland and Abbie (Locke) Penley, were also natives of Maine. They came to Kansas in 1870, locating about two miles north of Augusta. Charles F. Penley took up a homestead claim and was engaged in farming...

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Biographical Sketch of William S. Lougee

Lougee, William S.; asst. building inspector; born, Buckfield, Me., Jan. 29, 1867; educated in Boston, Mass.; studied architecture with Tristram Griffin, Boston, Mass., eight years; in 1890, came to Cleveland; associated with John Eisenmann 1890-1900; asst. architect Board of Education until 1905; when appointed to present...

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Pequawket Tribe

Pequawket Indians (a name of disputed etymology, the most probable rendering, according to Gerard, being ‘at the hole in the ground,’ from pekwakik). A tribe of the Abnaki confederacy, formerly living on the headwaters of Saco River and about Lovell’s Pond, in Carroll County, New Hampshire, and Oxford County, Maine. Their principal village, called Pequawket, was about the present Fryeburg, Maine. The tribe is famous for a battle fought in 1725 near the village, between about 50 English under Capt. Lovewell and 80 Indians, the entire force of the tribe, under their chief, Pangus. Both leaders were killed, together with 36 of the English and a large part of the Indian force. By this loss the Pequawket were so weakened that, together with the Arosaguntacook, they soon after withdrew to the sources of Connecticut River. After being there for a short while, the Arosaguntacook removed to St Francis in Canada, while the Pequawket remained on the Connecticut, where they were still living under their chief at the time of the Revolution. Some of them seem to have found their way back to their old home some time after the Lovewell fight. Pequawket Synonmy Pâgwâki. Kendall, Trav., III, 173, 1809 (correct form). Paquakig. Gyles (1726) in Me. Hist. Soc. Coll., III, 358, 1853. Peckwalket. Sullivan in N. H. Hist. Soc. Coll., I, 27, 1824. Peg8akki. French letter (1721) in Mass. Hist....

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Town History of Fryeburg, Maine

Nestled close to the New Hampshire border is the small community of Fryeburg, Maine. Our newest online free manuscript provides you a look into the history of this community. Included with this manuscript is information on the Sokokis Indians, and a brief military history of Fryeburg.

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Biography of Hon. L. F. Grover

HON. L.F. GROVER. – Governor La Fayette Grover was born in Bethel, Maine, November 29, 1823, of ancestry on both sides distinguished in the early and late history of Massachusetts. He is a brother of Major Abernethy Grover, a man of distinction in the politics of Maine and in the war of the Rebellion; of Professor Talleyrand Grover, an eminent classist; and of General Cuvier Grover, a skillful commander in the war of the Rebellion. He was educated at the Classical Academy of Bethel, and at Bowdoin College, Maine. He studied law in Philadelphia under the instruction of the late Asa I. Fish, and was admitted to the bar there in March, 1850. Late in the autumn of that year, he took passage on a merchant vessel bound round Cape Horn to San Francisco, where he arrived in July, 1851, and in the next month reached Portland by the old steamer Columbia. He at once proceeded to Salem, where he established himself as a layer. The first regular term of the United States district court was held at Salem in the following month; and on the invitation of Chief Justice Nelson, who presided over the court, Mr. Grover became the clerk, stipulating that he would accept the position temporarily, and until a suitable successor could be appointed. He held the office six months, obtaining an excellent acquaintance with local...

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1907 Fryeburg Maine Census

The population of the towns of Fryeburg, Lovell, Sweden Stow and Chatham has been arranged in families, where that arrangement has been possible. In these families, in addition to the resident living members, the names of the nonresident members are included. It should be borne in mind that this plan does not include the names of all former residents of this town, as the names of the non-residents appear only when one or both of the parents are still living in the town. After the name of each non-resident will be found the present address, when such address has...

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