Location: Otsego County NY

Five Nations Burial Customs

Writing of the Iroquois or Five Nations, during the early years of the eighteenth century, at a time when they dominated the greater part of the present State of New York, it was said: “Their funeral Rites seem to be formed upon a Notion of some Kind of Existence after Death. They make a large round Hole, in which the Body can be placed upright, or upon its Haunches, which after the Body is placed in it, is covered with Timber, to support the Earth which they lay over, and thereby keep the Body free from being pressed; they then raise the Earth in a round Hill over it. They always dress the Corps in all its Finery, and put Wampum and other Things into the Grave with it; and the Relations suffer not Grass or any Weed to grow on the Grave, and frequently visit it with Lamentations.” The circular mound of earth over the grave was likewise mentioned a century earlier, having been seen at the Oneida village which stood east of the present Munnsville, Madison County, New York. “Before we reached the castle we saw three graves, just like our graves in length and height,; usually their graves are round. These graves were surrounded with palisades that they had split from trees, and they were closed up so nicely that it was a wonder to see....

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Harding

For many years Benjamin Harding was a leading free-soil man and a resident of Doniphan County, Kansas. A native of Otsego County, New York, born in November, 1815, at the age of twenty-five he became a resident of Livingston County, Missouri, and in 1842 entered the Indian trade at the Great Nemaha Agency. He moved to St. Joseph in 1849, but re-entered the Indian trade at Wathena, Kansas, in 1852. In 1854, while serving there as a judge of election he incurred the enmity of the pro-slavery people, and twice reported at Leavenworth to answer charges brought against him, which were finally dismissed. He was a delegate to the Big Springs convention of 1855; served in the Territorial Council in 1857, 1858 and 1859; was a member of the Railroad convention of 1860, and held the office of register of deeds of Doniphan County in 1862-66, after which he passed a somewhat retired life. He died at his home in Wathena, January 15,...

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Biography of Alfred Clark Pierce

At the age of eighty-one, bearing the impress of a life of remarkable experience, a pioneer builder of Kansas, for many years identified with its public and business life, this venerable citizen is now living in comfortable retirement at Junction City. A small party of free state men arrived in Kansas in 1856. It comprised eight or ten men. One of them was Preston B. Plumb, whose name is a household word in Kansas. Alfred Clark Pierce was also in that little party. At Iowa City, Iowa, he had first met Mr. Plumb, and they were ever afterwards intimate friends. Besides coming to Kansas as pioneer settlers and for the purpose of lending their individual aid to the free state movement, this party convoyed a very significant train of supplies, including 250 Sharpe rifles, a supply of ammunition, and a small brass cannon. Those who are acquainted with the seenes anacted on Kansas soil in subsequent months need not be told to what purpose these military supplies were devoted. At Manhattan the party divided. Mr. Pierce went to what was then the far western Kansas, and located a claim on which the City of Salina had since been built. However, in November, 1856, he abandoned the claim and went to Ogden. There he was employed in cutting logs and later took up surveying. Mr. Pierce permanently settled at Junction...

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Biography of Henry Pearsall

Henry Pearsall came from Long Island about 1787 and settled in the north-east part of Afton, one-half mile west of what was known as the Middle Bridge, which went off in a freshet a number of years ago and was not rebuilt. Having built a small house in the woods, he brought in his family, consisting of his wife, Anna Simmons, and one or two children. The house thus erected answered the double purpose of a dwelling and shop, for he followed his trade till his death. About 1809 he removed to the north line of the town of Bainbridge, about three miles north of Bainbridge village, and took up 88 acres, on which he resided till his death, about 1840. His children were: Amos, who married Clarissa, daughter of John Nichols, an early settler in the north part of Bainbridge, and settled in the locality of his father in Bainbridge, where he died February 18, 1864, aged 72, and his wife July 4, 1878, aged 83; Ann, who married Alson Searles, a resident of Bainbridge, and is now living at Unadilla, her husband having died June 26, 1871; Smith, who married Polly, sister of Alson Searles, and settled near his father, where he died in 1874; Samuel, who married Sally, daughter of Henry Thompson, of Bainbridge, and settled and died in the same locality; Abigail, who married Ansel...

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Biographical Sketch of William Johnston

William Johnston, a Revolutionary soldier, came in from Hartwick, Otsego county, in 1807, and settled a half mile south of Bettsburgh, on the farm now occupied by Devillo Dutton. He took up 50 acres in Broome county, on the line of Afton, and bought about one and one-half acres in Afton, the title to which proved defective. He subsequently purchased it of Asa Stowel. He afterwards removed to the town of Sanford, in Broome county, where he died February 10, 1843, aged 91, and Deborah, his wife, April 14, 1843, aged 81. He had six children, only one of whom is now living, Levi, in Afton, aged...

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Biography of Hector Ross

In the town of Sherburne, and near the village of the same name, Chenango county, is a locality known as the “Quarter,” taking its name from the fact that it comprises one-quarter of the town. Here is located a thriving little manufacturing and trading settlement. By far the greater part of the life and prosperity of this place are due to the business capacity and the energy of the man whose portrait appears above. Hector Ross was born in Greenock, Scotland, in 1811. His father’s name was John Ross, who was a molder. living in Greenock. His mother’s maiden name was Isabel Melville. She was also a native of Scotland, and came to this country in the year 1844. With her came also two brothers of Hector Ross–William and George, and one sister, Bell, all residents of Binghamton. When Hector Ross first came to this country, in 1837, he landed in Canada, where he was employed for a brief time in a foundry. Leaving the Dominion, he crossed to Charlotte, and from there went to Rochester, walking the distance, as he was entirely out of funds. Finding no employment in Rochester, he started on foot eastward, but found nothing to do until he reached Brownell’s mills, in Oneida Co., where he worked one day, during the absence of one of the hands, who was known as a hand mule...

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Biography of Rt. Rev. Daniel Sylvester Tuttle

Rt. Rev. Daniel Sylvester Tuttle, who since 1903 has been presiding bishop of Missouri, was born in Windham, New York, January 26, 1837, a son of Daniel Bliss and Abigail Clarke (Stimpson) Tuttle. The father was born in Wallingford, Connecticut, and was a son of Charles Tuttle, a Revolutionary war soldier of the Connecticut line. Abigail C. Tuttle came of Holland ancestry. Bishop Tuttle prepared for college in Delaware Academy of New York and was graduated from Columbia College of New York city with the class of 1857. In early manhood he took up the profession of teaching and was thus identified with Columbia College Grammar School for a year, while later he served for a year as a private tutor in New York city. Preparing for the ministry, he was graduated from the General Theological Seminary of New York city with the class of 1862 and in the same year was ordained a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal church, while in 1863 he was ordained to the priesthood. In 1862 he became pastor of Zion church at Morris, New York, where he labored until 1867. From Columbia University he has received the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts and Doctor of Sacred Theology. In 1867 he transferred his labors from the Atlantic coast to the far west, being consecrated bishop of Montana, Idaho and Utah on...

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Biography of George B. Hill

George B. Hill, of the extensive mercantile firm of Hill & Ballentine, of Bellevue, Idaho, is one of Idaho’s prominent businessmen and states-men. He came, through New England ancestry, of honorable English and German descent, and was born at Cherry Valley, New York, August 28, 1843. He is of fighting stock, too, his great-grandfather Hill having fought for independence in the Revolution, his grandfather Hill having risked his life for his country in the war of 18 1 2- 14, and his father and himself having done battle for the Union in the civil war of 1861-65, the latter yielding up his life on the field in defense of the starry flag, while his maternal grand-father Busch fought in the war of 1812-14. Charles Hill, father of George B. Hill, was a native of Barrington, Massachusetts. He became a lawyer of ability and while yet a young man re-moved to Cherry Valley, New York, where he married Margaret Busch, of German descent and a daughter of an old and honored resident of that town. He was a member of the One Hundred and Twenty-first New York Volunteer Infantry and was killed while upon a reconnaissance in 1864. His good wife, a devout member of the Christian church, survived until 1884, and died in her seventy-ninth year. George B. Hill was the youngest but one of the eight children of...

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph Sherman Van De Boe

Van De Boe, Joseph Sherman; real estate; born, Jan. 20, 1859, Cooperstown, N. Y.; son of John Leeland Van De Boe; common school education; married in December, 1881, Miss Mary A. Wood, of Lebanon; issue, one son, Hugh Robert, born Oct. 14, 1885; Mrs. Van De Boe died in December, 1909, while visiting her son, in Hong Kong, China; business career, began to work when 12 years of age; worked on a farm; mgr. Drug Co. in Andover, N. Y.; realizing the need of further education, worked in country store in Ulysses, Pa., and attended Academy there; then went to Eastman Business College, in Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; worked in store in country, and later taught school; studied more, and graduated from Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Mass.; lived in Sanford, Fla., for four years; bookkeeper and gen. mgr. of dry goods and grocery store; went into business for himself, continuing until 1887, when store was destroyed by fire; went to Chicago, and did a brokerage business; then with Boston real estate firm; began on small salary, but in ten months made gen. mgr., with salary of $100 per week and expenses; in 1893, located in Buffalo, N. Y.; in 1895, formed partnership with W. M. Hagar; came to Cleveland, and started present business; pres. of the company; has laid out thirteen subdivisions in Cleveland; has a branch office in Columbus, O.;...

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Biographical Sketch of Arthur Silas Wright

Wright, Arthur Silas; educator; born, Decatur, N. Y., March 7, 1858; son of Hanson and Fannie M. (Mason) Wright; A. B., Union College, 1882, A. M., 1886; Princeton Theological Seminary, 1884-1885; University of Leipzig, 1885-1887; married, Julia B. Barbyte, of Schenectady, N. Y., April 2, 1890; junior prof. modern languages, Union College, 1887-1892; prof. modern languages, Case School of Applied Science, since 1893; member Modern Language Association of America; Modern Language Association of Ohio. Editor: In St. Jurgen (Theodor Storm), 1901; Entwicklungslehre (v. Wagner), 1903; Elektronentheorie (Kayser),...

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Biographical Sketch of Frederick A. Manchester

Manchester, Frederick A.; real estate; born Otsego county, N. Y., Nov. 28, 1863; son of Dewitt C. and Julia Bates Manchester; from 1870-1877, public schools, Mentor, Lake County O.; married, Concord, O., May 5, 1887, Evalena A. Sherman; issue, Marguerite A. and Sherman A., who was Intercollegiate Ohio State champion in tennis in 1913; farmer until 1901, specialty of fruit growing; came to Cleveland in 1901, and went into the real estate business with The Frisbee Co.; supt. of Sales Dept., nine years; in 1909, accepted position of sales mgr. for The Scott-Hall-Clark Co., now The Clark-Manchester Co.; pres. The Clark-Manchester Realty Co. Recreation: Reading, general News and Good...

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Wright, Bertha Rose Georgia – Obituary

Mrs. Bertha Wright, wife of A. M. Wright, died at her home on the north side early last Monday morning [September 30, 1901] of typhoid fever. She had been sick for a couple of weeks but as her friends had all long hoped for her early recovery, her death came as a great shock. The high esteem in which Mrs. Wright was held was evidenced by the many sincere expressions of sympathy and the presence of so many at the services on Tuesday afternoon at the home. Besides the grief-stricken husband, she leaves six children, who are thus deprived of the love and care of an affectionate and devoted mother. To them all, in their great bereavement, the entire community is extending deep sympathy. Bertha was the daughter of Orrin Georgia and Susan Murray. She was born November 1867 in Otsego Co., NY. She married Alfred Malcolm Wright on June 21, 1886 in Otsego Co., NY. Interment at IOOF Cemetery. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Benjamin Todd of Cherry Valley NY

Benjamin Todd5, (Benjamin4, Benjamin3, Michael2, Christopher1) born 1756, died May 6, 1833, in Cherry Valley, N. Y., married March 1, 1778, Hannah Reynolds. Children: *386. John, b. Feb. 16, 1779. 387. Sophia, b. May 10, 1781. 388. Louise, b. Nov. 29, 1783. 389. Hannah, b. April 23, 1786. 390. Dorcas, b. July 17, 1788. 391. James, b. April 29, 1791. *392. Elnathan, b. Aug. 23, 1793. 393. Massa, b. Aug. 23, 1793. 394. Melinda, b. Sept. 10, 1799. 395. Sally, b. May 19,...

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Jehiel Todd of Toddville NY

Jehiel Todd6, (Stephen5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Nov. 3, 1761, died Jan. 28, 1843, in Toddville, N. Y., married in 1781, Hannah, daughter of Glover and Lydia (Allen) Street, who was born Oct. 1, 1758, died July 21, 1836. He was born and lived for some time in Wallingford, Conn. Glover Street, was son of Samuel and Keziah (Munson) Street; Samuel was son of Lieut. Samuel and Hannah (Glover) Street; Lieut. Samuel was a son of Rev. Samuel and Anna (Miles) Street; Rev. Samuel Street was son of Rev. Nicholas and(???)(Poole) Street. Keziah Munson was a daughter of Caleb and Elizabeth (Harmon) Munson; Caleb was a son of Ensign Samuel and Mary (Bradley) Munson; Ensign Samuel was a son of Capt. Thomas and Joanna Munson. Hannah Glover was a daughter of John Glover, who was a son of Henry Glover. Anna Miles was a daughter of Dea. Richard and Catherine (Constable) Miles. Mary Bradley was a daughter of William Bradley and Alice Pritchard daughter of Roger. Jehiel Todd lived several years succeeding the year 1800 in Northampton, Mass., and there are many deeds recorded transfering property in that town and vicinity, among which was one that conveyed to him a one third part of a grist and saw mill there. Later he went to Toddsville, N. Y., where he owned and operated a flouring mill and paper mill....

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Chauncey Todd of Otsego County NY

Chauncey Todd6, (Jonah5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born March 24, 1784, in Cheshire, Conn., died July 26, 1855, in New Berlin, N. Y., married Sept. 13, 1812, Susan Hotchkiss, of Bethany, Conn., who was born July 18, 1792, died April 20, 1854. There must have been some Horace Greeley in those days telling young men to “Go West”, for he set forth for the unbroken wilderness of Central New York in 1805. He returned later to Connecticut to look for some young woman also anxious to “Go West”, and found her in the person of Susan Hotchkiss to whom he was married on Sept. 13, 1812. It is the tradition that the wedding trip was made on horseback to the new home in the forest in the town of Butternuts, Otsego County, N. Y. In this pioneer home they lived for many years and there was born the patriarchal family of eleven, all of whom grew to man and woman-hood, nine of them marrying and having families. He was a true pioneer, for after spending many years on the Butternuts farm, he moved to the vicinity of New Berlin, Chenango County, and there carved out another home. Late in life he again became restless and was with difficulty dissuaded from again breaking up and emigrating to the wilds of Michigan. The following sketch was written by his son, Rev....

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