Location: Oswego New York

Narrative of Robert Eastburn – Indian Captivities

A Faithful Narrative of the Many Dangers and Sufferings, as well as wonderful and surprising deliverances, of Robert Eastburn, during his late captivity among the Indians. Written by Himself. Published at the earnest request of many persons, for the benefit of the Public. With a recommendatory Preface by the Rev. Gilbert Tennent. Psalms 24, 6, 7, and 193, 2, 4. Philadelphia: Printed. Boston: Reprinted and sold by Green & Russell, opposite the Probate Office in Queen street, 1753. Preface Candid Reader: The author (and subject) of the ensuing narrative (who is a deacon of our church, and has been so for many years) is of such an established good character, that he needs no recommendation of others where he is known; a proof of which was the general joy of the inhabitants of this city, occasioned by his return from a miserable captivity; together with the readiness of divers persons to contribute to the relief of himself and necessitous family, without any request of his, or the least motion of that tendency. But seeing the following sheets are like to spread into many places where he is not known, permit me to say that, upon long acquaintance, I have found him to be a person of candor, integrity, and sincere piety, whose testimony may with safety be depended upon; which give his narrative the greater weight, and may induce...

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Fort Ontario, Oswego, New York

It was in 1722 that Oswego, New York, was made the site of an armed camp and, at that, it was more through the stubborn determination of Governor Burnet of the colony that the thing should be done than through any willingness of the staid burghers of the State Assembly to cooperate with their executive in schemes leading to future good. As a matter of fact, Governor Burnet is said to have paid the bill for establishing his little fort out of his own pocket, though he may have made this sum up in some other direction authorities do not tell us this kind of thing! Yet this little post was to become one of the most decisive factors in determining the result of the conflict between France and England for the New World, the flags of three Christian nations were to fly over it at different periods, and warriors white, red, French, English and colonial were to struggle for its possession. So much grows out of so little! One of the earliest mentions of Oswego in the history of the colonies is that in 1687 the Onondaga Indians presented a petition to the mayor and common council of Albany, that busy little trading post, requesting them to establish a trading post and fort at this point. The mayor and common council evidently thought that this was too wild...

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Biography of Dr. Alden H. Steele

DR. ALDEN H. STEELE. – “Olympia will always be a place for pleasant homes,” says one of her citizens well qualified to render an opinion, – the gentleman whose name appears above. The wide streets, magnificent shade-trees and comfortable residences of the capital of Washington Territory, together with her delightful climate, an extensive view of water and mountains, fully justify the remark; and no place could have a more pleasant recommendation. The Doctor has also examined the facilities of the place for a naval station, and finds that the location is most desirable from the following particulars: Safe anchorage and good harbor; ease of defense; abundance of coal, iron and ship timber; opportunity for a fresh-water dock and basin at small cost at Priest’s Point; ease of communication; and advantage of tide. Doctor Steele, whose presence as a resident contributes much towards the pleasantness of Olympia, is a native of New York State, having been born in 1823 at Oswego, where his father had long been a successful merchant. At the age of twenty our subject graduated from the medical department of the University of New York, and also from the office of Doctor James R. Woods, the distinguished professor of surgery. The first practice of the young physician was at Oswego, new York; but in 1849, in company with the mounted riflemen under Lieutenant-Colonel Loring, he crossed the...

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George Nelson Todd of Oswego NY

George Nelson Todd7, (Caleb6, Caleb5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born April 3, 1810, died April 1, 1887, married Aug. 25, 1842, Mary E., daughter of Edward Elliott, of Clinton, N. Y., who was born Oct. 3, 1814, died Sept. 24, 1874. They lived in Oswego, N. Y. He was a clergyman. Children: *1298. Edward Elliott, b. July 14, 1844. *1299. Adelaide Stoyell, b. Sept. 18, 1847. 1300. Herman Adelbert, b. June 5, 1850; he lived at Susquehanna Depot,...

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Joseph Todd of New York

Joseph Todd7, (Daniel6, Daniel5, Daniel4, Daniel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Aug. 27, 1827, in East Rodman, N. Y., died July 3, 1864, while aboard a transport ship on the James River, of Typhoid Fever contracted in service in the civil war and was buried at Fortress Monroe, Va. He married at Oswego, N. Y., Sept. 24, 1851, Giffy Lewis, who is now (1913) living with her grand-daughter, Mrs. Hardy Esterdalph, of Whitehall, Mich. Children: 1540. Byron Montrose, d. Aug., 1854. *1541. Stella Janette. *1542. Nettie...

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Mary Elizabeth Todd Brand of Utica NY

BRAND, Mary Elizabeth Todd8, (Zerah7, Jehiel6, Stephen5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born June 17, 1838, in Milford, Otsego County, N. Y., died June 30, 1871, in Utica, N. Y., married Oct. 8, 1867, in Oswego, N. Y., James H. Brand, who was born March 24, 1831. Child: I. Byron S., b. June 26, 1871, d. Aug. 24,...

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Biographical Sketch of Rev. Father Crowe

Rev. Father Crowe, Pastor of the Catholic Church, Mattoon; was born in Oswego, N. Y., Sept. 19, 1851; his early life was passed in the public schools of his native city; here he completed a full course of instruction, passing regularly through the high school and normal department; at about the age of 18 years, he engaged in the profession of teaching, and was a member of the Faculty in the College at Tutopolis, and, at a later date, in that at Ruma, Ill.; having for some time directed his thoughts in the channel of the legal profession, and, at a later date, to that of the medical profession, finally, in 1873, he entered the Grand Seminary, at Montreal, Canada, where for four years he pursued a course in theology; he was ordained to the ministry Dec. 22, 1877; he then took charge of a church at Flora, Ill., for a short time, and, in March, 1878, came to Mattoon, his present residence; by virtue of his position, he is President of the schools connected with the Church, conducted by the Ursuline Sisters, from...

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Biography of Fred Eugene Pettit

Fred Eugene Pettit is a veteran business man and merchant of Marion County, and until he retired a few years ago conducted one of the largest stores at Peabody. Mr. Pettit was reared and educated and gained his first mercantile experience in the State of Illinois. He was born at Wyoming in Stark County, Illinois, January 8, 1861, a son of Peter and Mary Anne (Bailey) Pettit. Peter Pettit was born in New York State and located in Illinois in 1851, when the country was new and undeveloped. After a few years he lost his health and suffered invalidism throughout the latter part of his life. He died at the comparatively early age of forty-six years. Mary Anne (Bailey) Pettit was born in Devonshire, England, in 1830. When she was six years of age she came with her father to America. The Baileys first located at Oswego, New York, moved from there to Wisconsin for three years, and then returned to New York State and located near Syracuse. It was at Syracuse that Mary Bailey married Peter Pettit in 1851. After their marriage they moved to Wyoming, Illinois, and she continued to make her home in that state for many years, but finally came to Peabody, Kansas, where she died in September, 1911. Peter Pettit and wife had four children: Edgar A., deceased; Maggie May, Mrs. J. D. Smith,...

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Biography of Colonel Stanhope E. Blunt

The history of the United States Government Arsenal located upon Rock Island is exhaustively narrated from its inception in another portion of this work. Consequently it is not the intention of the writer of this sketch to touch upon any phase of that history except the period covered by the regime of the present Commandant of Rock Island Arsenal, Colonel Stanhope E. Blunt, a man whose executive ability has been demonstrated of a high order. Stanhope E. Blunt was born in Boston, Massachusetts, September 28, 1850. His father was Colonel Charles E. Blunt, Corps of Engineers, United States – Army, who graduated from the Military Academy at West Point in 1846. His mother before her marriage was Miss Penelope Bethune English. Both his father and mother were born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Colonel Blunt’s forebears were among the earliest colonists in America. His paternal ancestors , rank among the original settlers of Massachusetts, who, as history records, arrived there from England about 1634. As a boy Colonel Blunt attended the public schools of his native city, Boston, and later the high school at Oswego, New York, from which he graduated in 1868, and thus he was well qualified for entrance to West Point. Upon the completion of the prescribed course of four years at the military academy, he graduated from that institution in 1872 with the rank of second...

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