Location: Oskaloosa Iowa

Linsley, Vesta Phillippe – Obituary

Visitation: Open after 2:00 PM with family present between the hours of 6:00 and 8:00 PM February 29, 2008 at Fremont Funeral Chapel Funeral Service: 10:00 AM March 01, 2008 at Fremont Funeral Chapel Interment: Cedar Township Cemetery, Fremont, Iowa Vesta Linsley, 97 formerly of the Fremont-Hedrick area passed away February 25, 2008 at Crystal Heights Care Center in Oskaloosa, Iowa. Vesta was born January 30, 1911 the daughter of Asa G. Phillippe and Carrie Amelia Lawson Phillippe. She graduated from Fremont High School in 1928 and attended William Penn College in Oskaloosa where she received her teaching certificate. She was united in marriage to Amos Claire Linsley May 22, 1941 near Cedar where they farmed until the government took over their farm to be used for an air base during WWII, at which time they moved to a farm near Hedrick. Following her husband’s death, Vesta moved to Fremont. Vesta was a member of the Fremont United Methodist Church, United Methodist Women and former member of the 60+ Club and the Order of the Eastern Star. She is survived by three nieces Sandra (LaVerne)Stewart of Oskaloosa, Lois (Lowell) McCracken and Elnora Norris both of Fremont. She was preceded in death by her husband, Clair in 1972, a brother, Lee Phillippe, six sisters, Thelma Smith, Floy Perkins, Hazel Norris, Faye Simmons, Merle Hoffman, and Marie Linsley. Two nephews, Lee...

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Biography of Sol. E. Waggoner

Sol. E. Waggoner, president of the Masonic Home of St. Louis, has long been a recognized leader in the Masonic fraternity of Missouri and has contributed much to the growth and success of the order in the state. A native of Ohio he was born March 8, 1851, and is justly proud to trace his descent from General Waggoner of Revolutionary war fame who was a resident of Virginia. His father, William Waggoner, lived for some time in Ohio and in 1858 established his home in Macon, Missouri. He was one of only eight in the entire county who supported Abraham Lincoln for the presidency in 1860 and the political antagonism which he thus engendered rendered it so uncomfortable for him that he removed to Iowa in 1861, where he later engaged in the contracting business. He married Malinda Small, a native of Pennsylvania, and she, too, came of Revolutionary war ancestry. Her death occurred in 1874, while William Waggoner long survived his wife and had reached the venerable age of ninety-two years when he passed away in 1902. Reared in Oskaloosa, Iowa, Sol. E. Waggoner there attended the public schools and after leaving the high school became a student in Oskaloosa College, from which he was graduated in due course of time. He was early identified with the Western Union Telegraph Company as circuit manager on the old...

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Biographical Sketch of John S. Edwards

The subject of this article is one of Malheur’s foremost men in the realm of stock raising and agricultural pursuits, which are the wealth of our County, and he has labored in the section since an early day, having the distinction of being one of the first pioneers and real builders of the County. John S. was born near Oskaloosa. Iowa, on November 25, 1849, being the son of Thomas D. and Barbara E. (Rinehart) Edwards. In 1854 the parents came with ox teams in a large train to Lane County, Oregon, passing through the territory of what is now Malheur and Barney Counties. Some stock was stolen on the road, but no other trouble befell them. In Lane County the father entered government land and settled down to farming. Until the spring of 1871 the subject of this sketch lived with his parents and then came to where Vale now stands, there being but one cabin there then. Two years later he came to the vicinity of his present home and engaged in stock business. Mr. Edwards now has about nine hundred acres of land, four hundred of which is fine bottom land and the remainder grazing land. He has the ranch well improved, occupies a fine two-story residence, has good barns and outbuildings, a fine orchard, and also owns a large band of horses and some cattle....

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Biography of Hon. Hiram D. Morgan

HON. HIRAM D. MORGAN. – This gentleman, whose portrait appears in this history, and who is so well known up and down the Sound, has had a varied pioneer life since 1853. He is a native of Ohio, having been born at Mount Ayre in 1822. During his boyhood, his parents moved to Marion and other portions of the state; and in the course of his development he learned the carpenter’s trade, which has ever been a great reliance to him. In 1846 he came out to Oskaloosa, Iowa, and in 1853 became one of the Davis party to cross the plains to Oregon. At Salmon Falls he left the train and came on to Fort Boise, and with all his possessions on his shoulders walked down to The Dalles, and at the Cascades was employed by Bush & Baker in building a large bateau and ferry-boat. In October he left for Olympia, and in 1854 built there a schooner, the Emlie Parker, on a speculation, which he sold to advantage. When the war broke out in 1855 he was engaged by Michael T. Simmons, Indian agent, to act as his secretary. Mr. Morgan was soon selected by the Indians to act as agent. He built seven houses under contract on the Squakson agency, and twelve house for the Indians on the Puyallup agency, and in 1861 was appointed...

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Biography of Anna Mallows, Anna

Miss Anna Mallows. To paraphrase an old proverb, To woman’s work there is neither end or limit of capacity for human service and usefulness. Women have succssded as home makers, as teachers, in all the learned professions, in executive business, and one of the bright Kansas women, Miss Anna Mallows, is a very successful newspaper woman, proprietor, and publisher of the White Cloud Globe. The White Cloud Globe is now the only paper published in that city. It was founded in 1892 by John J. Faulkner, and throughout its twenty-five years it had never exhibited more enterprise as a real newspaper than under the present management. The offices of the plant are on Main Street, and its circulation extends all over Doniphan and surrounding counties, and many copies go to diverse parts of the United States and even to China. Politically it is a republican journal. Miss Mallows was born at White Cloud. Her father, Samuel Mallows, was born near Wilton, Norfolk County, England, in 1843, and was thirteen years of age when he came to this country with his parents. The family were among the pioneers in the rural district near Iowa Point, Kansas, and Samuel Mallows grew up on the homestead claim his father had pre-empted not far from Iowa Point in Doniphan County. His active years were passed as a farmer and he subsequently removed to...

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Biography of John M. Haines

The wise system of industrial economics which has been brought to bear in the development of Boise has challenged uniform admiration, for while there has been a great advancement in all material lines, there has been an entire absence of that inflation of values and that erratic “booming” which have in the past proved the eventual death knell to many of the localities of the west, where “mushroom” towns have one day smiled forth with “all modern improvements” and practically on the next day have been shorn of their glories and of their possibilities of stable prosperity, so to remain until the existing order of things shall have been radically changed. In Boise progress has been made continuous and in safe lines, and this is due in no small degree to Mr. Haines and those with whom he is associated in the real-estate business under the firm name of W. E. Pierce & Company. To real-estate men, probably more than to any one else, is due the healthful development of the town, and Boise is certainly indebted to this firm for much of its substantial growth and improvement. It is there fore meet that its members be represented in the history of the capital city, and therefore with pleasure we take up the task of preparing the life record of J. M. Haines. This gentleman was born in Jasper...

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Biography of L. C. Eastman

The quality of a man’s manhood has everything to do with not only the degree but with the quality of his success. In point of magnitude a man’s success may be great, but it may be of a character pitifully weak, if not dangerous to the public weal. The sold, substantial, honest and admirable success which brings a man not only money but the respect of his fellow men is the kind of success that has crowned the endeavors of the man whose name appears as the title of this article. L. C. Eastman, postmaster at Soda Springs, Idaho, and pioneer and leading druggist of that city, was born at Oskaloosa, Iowa, August 22, 1855, a son of Hon. Enoch and Caroline (Greenough) Eastman. The founder of this family of Eastman in America was Jeremiah Eastman, an English gentleman who had a fine place near some of the landed property of the king of England. Frequently, it is related, he was annoyed by the sheep belonging to His Majesty breaking into his grounds and injuring them. Remonstrance was vain. One day the animals invaded Mr. Eastman’s garden and destroyed it, and in driving them out, not any too gently perhaps, the wronged subject shot one of them, greatly to the displeasure of those who were presumed to have them in charge and to His Majesty’s personal displeasure also, it...

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Biography of Jackson B. Crane

Jackson B. Crane. Although the founder of the Crane family in Kansas, Jackson B. Crane was neither born nor died in this state, he spent forty-five years here, the best part of his life, and his name deserves preservation in the country’s enduring annals. His was one of the first pioneer cabins built in 1854 within a radius of eleven miles west of Leavenworth, then the frontier. He was one of that hardy band that not only dared the privations of the wilderness but had the resolute will that accepted a life that, at that time, positively demanded eternal vigilance because of savage strife. Through his almost fifty years here he worked effectively for the best interests of this section in every way, and courageously advocated reforms when only truly brave men did so. Jackson B. Crane was born in Ohio, owing his baptismal name, perhaps, to the fact that his birthday occurred on or very near the day that General Jackson captured New Orleans, January 8, 1815. In manhood he left his native state for Iowa, accompanied by his aged father, who died at Muscatine and was buried there. Mr. Jackson Crane remained at Oskaloosa, Iowa, until 1854, in the meanwhile becoming a trusted and valued citizen of Mahaska County, which he served two terms as sheriff. He had always been a democrat, a Jacksonian democrat, but the...

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Lee, Jay Right – Obituary

Jay Right Lee was born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, Feb. 2, 1853, and had he lived until February 2, would have been 75 years of age. He was next to the youngest child in a family of five and the last to survive, his oldest brother, W. M. Lee who spent most of his life in this vicinity, having passed away two years ago. Jay R. Lee crossed the plains with the family in the early sixties settling in Walla Walla, where he grew to manhood. He married Nancy Ann Pointer, Sept. 19, 1880, at Dayton, Wash. To this union were born 12 children of whom 10 are living. Mr. Lee is survived by his wife, Mrs. J. R. Lee, and the 10 children, namely, Mrs. P. J. Neal, Port Orchard; Mrs. Thomas, Walla Walla; Mrs. Jake Shinkoskey, Stockton, Cal.; Mrs. Win Delano, Hooper; Mrs. Harold Thomas, Bremerton, Wash.; Mrs. Bert Vinson, Portland; Mrs. F. M. Day, Folsom, Cal.; J. M. Lee, Colfax; Clarence Lee, Plummer, Ida.; J. R. Lee Jr., Stockton and Willie Lee of Ellensburg, a son by a former marriage. Mr. Lee was one of those sturdy pioneers whose strength and courage transformed the rough wild hills of Whitman county into one of the most fertile and productive regions of our land. When he settled at Lee’s siding in the 80s, there was a mass of rolling...

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Fellers, William Edward – Obituary

William Edward “Ed” Fellers, 89, Tompkins Memorial Health Center, died Tuesday, Sept. 28, 1999, at Trinity Regional Hospital, Fort Dodge. Services will be 10:30 a.m. Friday at the Gunderson Funeral Chapel, Fort Dodge, with the Rev. Ronald E. Krause officiated. Burial will be in North Lawn Cemetery, Fort Dodge. Visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. today at the Gunderson Funeral Home, Fort Dodge. Survivors are his wife Hulda Fellers; son Ronald Fellers, Dallas, Texas; daughter Betty Jane Barry, Boulder Junction, Wis.; four grandchildren; and one great grandchild. He was preceded in death by his parents, Harlan and Cara Phillippe Fellers, daughter Karen Kay Fellers, sister Helen Goodspeed, and brother Theron Fellers. William Edward “Ed” Fellers was born July 13, 1910, in Oskaloosa. In 1920, he moved with his family to Fort Dodge. He graduated from Fort Dodge High School in 1928 and began working for The Messenger as a printer after high school. He married Hulda O. Bertram in 1942 in Iowa City. The couple lived in Fort Dodge. He retired from The Messenger in 1971. He became a resident of Tompkins Memorial Health Center in May 1999. He was a member of St. Paul Lutheran Church and was a member of the Typographical Union. Memorials may be left to the St. Paul Lutheran Church Building Fund or to the Mission House. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Fellers, Theron P. – Obituary

Theron P. Fellers, 78, 1857 8th Ave. N., died Wednesday [March 20, 1991] at Trinity Regional Hospital. Services will be at 2 p.m. Saturday at First United Methodist Church, Fort Dodge. There will be no visitation. Burial will be at a later date at North Lawn Cemetery. Bruce’s Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Survivors include his wife, Katherine; sons, Phil and Stephan, both of Fort Dodge; daughter, Connie Schnurr, Fort Dodge; brother, W. Edward Fellers, Fort Dodge; 14 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren; sister, Helen Goodspeed, Gainesville, Fla. Theron P. Fellers was born July 3, 1912 at Oskaloosa and received his education in Fort Dodge. He married Katherine Cummings in 1936 at Des Moines. In 1942 he entered the U.S. Army, serving during World War II. After discharge from the service, he went to work at Fort Dodge Creamery where he worked until he retired in 1974. After retirement, he worked part time at Decker Trucking in Fort Dodge. He was a member of Eastern Star, White Shrine, and all other Masonic organizations of Fort Dodge. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biography of Owen M. Thomas

Owen M. Thomas. The Citizens State Bank of Bronson, of which Owen M. Thomas is vice president, is an institution which had grown rapidly and prospered since it was established less than ten years ago, and its success is largely due to the character of the men entrusted with its executive management. Mr. Thomas had been actively identified with banking for ten years, both in Oklahoma and in Kansas. Though a young man, his career had apparently been one of rapid accomplishment, and he had achieved as much in ten years as many men do in their entire active life. Mr. Thomas was born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, February 4, 1883, and spent much of his early youth in [p.2118] Oklahoma. His grandfather, Owen W. Thomas, was a native of Wales, afterwards became a farmer and property owner at Toulon, Illinois, where he died. Owen W. Thomas, Jr., father of the Bronson banker, was born at Toulon in Stark County, Illinois, in 1851. He grew up in his native county, and spent his brief active career as a farmer. He died at Oskaloosa, Iowa, in March, 1883, a few weeks after the birth of his son, Owen M. The maiden name of his wife was Dora Eisiminger, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1856. By her first husband she had just one child, Owen Mitchell Thomas. She afterwards married E....

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Biography of Fred B. Caldwell

Fred B. Caldwell. The cultivation of broad acres of land, the growing of crops, the raising of cattle and hogs, proved a stronger influence with Fred B. Caldwell than the profession of law, in which he was trained and which he followed for several years in Iowa before coming to Kansas. While Mr. Caldwell had occupied his ranch near Howard in Elk County only a few years, there is no mistaking the fact that he is one of the well-known stockmen and diversified farmers of the state. His Poland China hogs in particular have gained him at least a national reputation. Stockmen all over the state are acquainted with the record of his animals at the State Fair held at Topeka in September, 1916. There Mr. Caldwell won the grand championship prize on boars of any age. He also had the distinction of having produced the first hog to weigh more than 1,000 pounds at eighteen months of age. There are no finer specimens of this old and standard breed of Poland China to be found anywhere in the world than on the Caldwell ranch in Elk County. Mr. Caldwell is vice president of the Kansas Poland China Association. While he concentrates his efforts upon Poland China hogs, he is also a diversified farmer, and his ranch of 1,047 acres, situated 2½ miles southeast of Howard on the Elk...

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Yeager, Welthy Serelda Kimberly – Obituary

Joseph, Oregon Mrs. Yeager Passes After Long Illness Mrs. Welthy Yeager passed away at the home of daughter, Mrs. Jennie Action of Joseph Sunday morning following a long illness. Welthy Serelda Kimberly was born January 11, 1860 in Oskaloosa, Iowa and died March 3rd, 1940, aged 80 years, 1 month, 28 days. She came to Walla Walla by ox team with her parents in 1865. May 10, 1875 she was united in marriage to George M. Birdsell. To this union six children were born all of whom survive. They are Mrs. Hattie Wolfer, Lostine; Mrs. Jennie Action, Joseph; Mrs. Mabel Jackson, Portland; Mrs. Esther Wagner, Seattle, Wa; Mrs. Rosetta Birchfield, Medford; and Mrs. Georgia Kight, Clayton, Wa. Mr. Birdsell passed away in 1888. She was married to Corneilus J. Yeager in 1890 and came to Wallowa County the following year, settling on a homestead seven miles from Flora. To this union four children were born two of whom survive. They are Mrs. Lillie Harry, Oregon City and Mrs. Ruth Tomplins of Monmouth. Mrs. Florence Meyers and James Yeager are deceased. Mr. Yeager died in 1913 and Mrs. Yeager came to Joseph where she had since resided. She also leaves besides her children 18 grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren. Mrs. Yeager was a fine example of pioneer motherhood, living her life in far places with meager equipment, cheerfully without complaint....

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Phillippee, Howard Lee – Obituary

Howard Lee Phillippe, 77, of 1102 S. 11th St. died Saturday night [March 31, 1984] at the Mahaska Manor Nursing Home. He was born Sept. 18, 1906 at Fremont, the son of Asa and Carrie Lawson Phillippe. He was married to Carmen Wood at Newton on June 5, 1933. He retired in September of 1973 after working for 33 years for the Iowa Department of Transportation. He served as the Mahaska County foreman for the commission since 1959 and had been a maintenance man prior to that. He was a member of the First Christian Church, a past Woshipful Master of Council Masonic Lodge No. 644, a past Worthy Patron of Vega Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a member of the Harrold White Shrine of Jerusalem, the Pella Dutchmasters Antique Auto Club, and the Mahaska County Historical Society. He is survived by his wife Carmen of Oskaloosa; his daughter, Mrs. LaVerne (Sandra Lee) Stewart of Oskaloosa; two grandsons, and five sisters; Mrs. Vesta Linsley and Mrs. Marie Linsley, both of Hedrick, Mrs. Floy Perkins of Oskaloosa; Mrs. Merle Hoffman of Fremont, and Mrs. Faye Simmons of Nebraska. Oskaloosa Herald, April 2, 1984 Contributed by: Shelli...

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