Location: Orleans County LA

Spanish New Orleans

In that city you may go and stand to-day on the spot still as antique and quaint as the Creole mind and heart which cherish it, where gathered in 1765 the motley throng of townsmen and planters whose bold repudiation of their barter to the King of Spain we have just reviewed; where in 1768 Lafrénière harangued them, and they, few in number and straitened in purse but not in daring, rallied in arms against Spain’s indolent show of authority and drove it into the Gulf. They were the first people in America to make open war distinctly for the expulsion of European rule. But it was not by this episode-it was not in the wearing of the white cockade-‘ that the Creoles were to become an independent republic under British protection, or an American State. We have seen them in the following year overawed by the heavy hand of Spain, and bowing to her yoke. We have seen them ten years later, under her banner and led by the chivalrous Galvez, at Manchac, at Baton Rouge, at Mobile, and at Pensacola, strike victoriously and “wiser than they knew” for the discomfiture of British power in America and the promotion of American independence and unity. But neither was this to bring them into the union of free States. For when the United States became a nation the Spanish ensign...

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. M. S. Fayman

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Mrs. M. S. Fayman Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: St. Nazaire Parish LA Date of Birth: 1850 Reference: Personal interview with Mrs. Fayman, at her home, Cherry Heights near Baltimore, Md. “I was born in St. Nazaire Parish in Louisiana, about 60 miles south of Baton Rouge, in 1850. My father and mother were Creoles, both of them were people of wealth and prestige in their day and considered very influential. My father’s name was Henri de Sales and mother’s maiden name, Marguerite Sanchez De Haryne. I had two brothers Henri and Jackson named after General Jackson, both of whom died quite young, leaving me the only living child. Both mother and father were born and reared in Louisiana. We lived in a large and spacious house surrounded by flowers and situated on a farm containing about 750 acres, on which we raised pelicans for sale in the market at New Orleans. “When I was about 5 years old I was sent to a private School in Baton Rouge, conducted by French sisters, where I stayed until I was kidnapped in 1860. At that time I did not know how to speak English; French was the language spoken in my household and by the people in the parish. “Baton Rouge, situated on the Mississippi, was a river port and stopping place for all large...

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Slave Narrative of Reverend Williams

Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Rev. Williams Location: Lebanon, Ohio Place of Birth: Greenbriar County, West Virginia Date of Birth: 1859 Age: 76 Occupation: Methodist minister Miriam Logan Lebanon, Ohio July 8th Warren County, District 2 Story of REVEREND WILLIAMS, Aged 76, Colored Methodist Minister, Born Greenbriar County, West Virginia (Born 1859) “I was born on the estate of Miss Frances Cree, my mother’s mistress. She had set my grandmother Delilah free with her sixteen children, so my mother was free when I was born, but my father was not. “My father was butler to General Davis, nephew of Jefferson Davis. General Davis was wounded in the Civil War and came home to die. My father, Allen Williams was not free until the Emancipation.” “Grandmother Delilah belonged to Dr. Cree. Upon his death and the division of his estate, his maiden daughter came into possession of my grandmother, you understand. Miss Frances nor her brother Mr. Cam. ever married. Miss Frances was very religious, a Methodist, and she believed Grandmother Delilah should be free, and that we colored children should have schooling.” “Yes ma’m, we colored people had a church down there in West Virginia, and grandmother Delilah had a family Bible of her own. She had fourteen boys and two girls. My mother had sixteen children, two boys, fourteen girls. Of them-mother’s children, you understand, there were seven...

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Biographical Sketch of Aldrich, Thomas Bailey

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, son of Elias T. and Sara (Bailey) Aldrich, was born in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, N. H., November 11, 1836. He received his early education at the common schools in New Orleans, La., and at the Temple grammar school in Portsmouth. He commenced a course of study preparatory to entering college, but having the misfortune, in his fifteenth year, to lose his father, he abandoned that purpose, and entered the counting-room of an uncle, a merchant in New York. Her he remained for three years, and it was during that period that he began to contribute verses to the New York journals. A collection of his poems was published in 1855, the volume taking its name from the initial poem, “The Bells.” Mr. Aldrich’s most successful poem, “Babie Bell,” which was published in 1856, was copied and repeated all over the country. His next position was that of proofreader, and then reader for a publishing house. He became a frequent contributor to the New York “Evening Mirror,” “Putnam’s Magazine,” “The Knickerbocker,” and the weekly newspapers, for one of which he wrote “Daisy’s Necklace and What Came of It,” a prose poem which was afterwards issued in a volume, and attained a wide popularity. In 1856 Mr. Aldrich joined the staff of the “Home Journal,” continuing in this position for three years. He was also connected with the...

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Biography of Jonathan Wilkins

Jonathan Wilkins, one of the earliest inhabitants of Athens, was a man of very considerable learning, and for some time taught a pioneer school. Of his son, Timothy Wilkins, the following reminiscence is furnished by Dr. C. F. Perkins; it is hardly less strange than the history immortalized by Tennyson in 11 Enoch Arden.” Mr. Wilkins was skillful and enterprising in business, but, through no fault of his own, became embarrassed, was hard pressed by creditors, and pursued by writs. In those days, when a man could be imprisoned for a debt of ten dollars, to fail in business was an awful thing. Wilkins was not dishonest, but had a heart to pay if he could. He battled bravely with his misfortunes for a considerable period, but with poor success. One day in the year 1829, full of despair, he came from his home west of town, across the Hockhocking, and having transacted some business with the county clerk, went out, and was supposed to have returned home. The next morning it became known that he was not at his house. Inquiry and search being made, the boat in which he usually crossed the river was seen floating bottom upward, and his hat was also found swimming down the stream. Mr. Wilkins was a popular man in the community; news of his loss soon spread, the people gathered from...

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Biography of Francis Lester Hawkes

The old saying, that North Carolina is a good place to start from, is the key-note to the greatness of her people, as well as a term of reproach as accepted by them. All great men must seek the large centers of civilization in order to give to the world their message, but the great principles of their lives come from the land of their birth. A State is to be measured by the number of its good and great men, and not by material or physical predominance. Even intellectual gifts and culture cannot make a people great, but may become the instruments of their ruin. There are men in every period who shape the life and mold the thought of their time, and among these were some who made higher achievements in particular lines of work, “but in all the elements which form a positive character, in that kind of power which sways the minds of other men, and which molds public opinion, few men of his age deserve to rank higher than Francis Lister Hawks.” Dr. Hawks was born in New Bern, North Carolina, June 10, 1798. He was the second son of Francis and Julia Hawks. His father was of English and his mother of Irish descent. His grandfather, John Hawks, came to America with Governor Tryon, so well known in the early history of our...

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Biographical Sketch of H. Clay Lewis

Mr. H. Clay Lewis, one of the enterprising young farmers of Lake County, is the son, of Robert A. and Mary (Donaldson) Lewis and was born in Lake County, January 5, 1860. Mr. Lewis was raised on a farm, and when a boy had few school advantages. When seventeen years of age he went to New Orleans and entered Dolbear’s Commercial College, but the death of his father prevented him from completing his course, as he then returned to Lake County and assumed charge of his father’s farm. On December 25, 1884, he married Miss Maggie H. Harper, daughter of William Harper. Mrs. Lewis was born February 27, 1861. They have one son, Robert W. They do not belong, to any church. Mr. Lewis is a Mason and in politics a democrat. Although so young a man, by his own industry and fine business ability he has been able to buy a fine farm of 337 acres, in the best part of Lake County. He is a shipping agent at Upper Slews Landing. Mr. Lewis is a wide awake farmer, and a good citizen and an honest...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert A. Lewis

Robert A. Lewis (deceased) was a prominent farmer of Lake County, and was born in 1833, in Fulton County, Kentucky; his father was Major R. N. Lewis. Our subject had good educational advantages. In 1855 he married Mary Donaldson, who was born January 24, 1834 in New Madrid County, Missouri at Donaldson’s Point. She is the daughter of Andrew J. and Kate (Baird) Donaldson. Her father was born at Athens, Alabama, but was raised at Nashville, Tennessee, her mother at Chattanooga. Soon after they married they went to Missouri and remained until 1844 when they came to Lake County. Mr. Donaldson was a democrat and a farmer and died in 1845; his wife was a Methodist and died in 1866. To Mr. and Mrs. Lewis were born nine children, four boys and five girls, only three living: Henry C., Charles A. and Zaida. Mrs. Lewis was a Methodist. In 1861 he volunteered with the Madrid Bend Guards as second lieutenant and was soon promoted to first lieutenant, holding that position until the close of the war. After the war he gave his time to farming. In 1877 he moved his family to New Orleans, and then to Florida and in a short time they returned to Lake County. In 1880 Mr. Lewis lost his life in a painful accident. While turning down the wick in his lamp it exploded...

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Biography of Thomas J. Delaney

THOMAS J. DELANEY. To become distinguished at the bar requires not only capacity, but also sound judgment and persevering industry. These qualifications are combined in no gentleman at the Greene County bar to a greater extent than in Thomas J. Delaney. A careful and accurate adviser, and an earnest and conscientious advocate, his success at the bar has been achieved by the improvement of opportunities, by untiring diligence, and by close study and a correct judgment of men and motives. Like so many of the eminent men of the present day his early career was not a very auspicious one and gave no hints of the honor that was to come to him in later years. He was born in the city of New Orleans May 10, 1859. A son of James Delaney, who lost his life while serving for the South in the great civil strife of 1861, being fatally wounded at the siege of Corinth. He was a native of Ireland, but became a citizen of America in 1850, first making his home in the city of Brooklyn, and in 1859 removing to New Orleans, in which city his widow still resides. To their union a family of five children were given, the following of whom are living: Mary (Kearney), of Springfield, Missouri; Jennie (Beven), of McComb, Miss., and Thomas J. The education of Thomas J. was...

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Biography of Mark Carley

Mark Carley was one of the founders of the city of Champaign: His name appears again and again in connection with the early annals of that city and of Champaign County, and always he appears as a man of force, of almost unlimited enterprise and of a public spirit that was in keeping with his many successes in private life. He knew much of the world by experience and had come to Champaign County soon after returning from an excursion to California during the great gold excitement on the Pacific Coast. His own life was to a large degree the expression of those forces’ accumulated and inherited by him from a notable American ancestry. The Carleys were staunch and patriotic New Englanders. Mark Carley was born at Hancock in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, August 24, 1799. He was a son of Elijah and Agnes (Graham) Carley and a grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Washburn) Carley. He was thus related to the Washburns whose names appear frequently in New England history, and from the same family came the Washburns who were conspicuous in the early days of Illinois. The Carleys were of Scotch-Irish ancestry. They settled in America long before the Revolution, and one of the cherished possessions of the descendants is a discharge paper signed by George Washington and granting release from the Continental Army to Jonathan Carley, an...

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Biography of John F. Sheehan

JOHN F. SHEEHAN. – The gentleman whose name heads this brief memoir, an excellent portrait of whom appears in this history, has been a leading business man and resident of Port Townsend, Washington for almost thirty years. Mr. Sheehan is a native of the Sunny south, and was born in Baltimore Maryland, in 1840. When but an infant he suffered the irreparable loss of his father by death. His widowed mother then, with her two sons, our subject being but eighteen months old, paid a visit to Ireland, and at the end of one year returned to Baltimore. John F. was then taken by an uncle to New Orleans, where he received his education and resided until fifteen years of age. He then started out to do for himself, still being but a mere boy. He started for the Pacific coast, coming via the Nicaragua route, and arrived in San Francisco in the summer of 1856. The first two years in the Golden state were spent in the mines and at different occupations until the breaking out of the ever-memorable Frazer River excitement, when Mr. Sheehan joined the gold-seekers and came north, only to find on arriving at the mines that “All is not gold that glitters,” and also to find that the great excitement which had lured thousands was a humbug. On leaving the mines Mr. Sheehan came...

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Biography of Hiram C. Whitley

Hiram C. Whitley. The State of Kansas is filled with interesting men, many of them known to the world at large. The city of Emporia had several. One is a prominent business man, who for upwards of forty years had given his time and energies to the upbuilding of that locality. This is Hiram C. Whitley who was at one time chief of the secret service division of the United States Treasury. The story of his life, particularly the early years, reads like a book, and in fact his experiences have been described in a book which was published about twenty years ago and which throws an interesting light on life and times in the far South during the Civil war period and also that era known as the reconstruction period for ten years following the great Civil war. Mr. Whitley wrote this book under the title “In It” and it is somewhat in the nature of an autobiography, told simply and modestly, but illuminating that historic epoch in our nation’s history with which it deals. The author says: “The incidents related in this book are founded principally on facts, as they came to me during an experience of twelve years in the Secret Service of the United States Government.” Hiram C. Whitley is a native of the Pine Tree State, but his experiences have covered a larger part...

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Biography of Peter Taschetta

Peter Taschetta. One of the early permanent settlers of Leavenworth was Peter Taschetta, a native of Switzerland, born in Canton, January 6, 1822. He was of Italian ancestry, but long before his birth his people, living on the border between Italy and Switzerland, had property in the former country and his parents became Swiss subjects by purchase. The father was interested in stained glass manufacturing and, as a contractor, traveled extensively, particularly in France, overseeing the placing of stained glass in cathedrals and other structures, some of these being rare examples of artistic coloring. He employed a large number of men to do the work and, as his son Peter grew to years of responsibility, he became timekeeper and also financial agent for his father. In such capacity he visited different countries, necessarily learning their language and before he came to America not only spoke four languages fluently, but also wrote them. Peter Taschetta continued this life of constant travel in Europe until he was twenty-seven years old, it possibly having its influence in leading him to consider visiting America, a far-distant land in those days of slow-sailing vessels. In 1849 he landed at New Orleans, Louisiana, and from there journeyed up the Mississippi to St. Louis. In that city he engaged in mercantile pursuits for a time, but had not yet had the spirit of wanderlust been extinguished,...

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Mulvehill, J. T. Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. J. T. Mulvehill, a former resident of Union, died in the Baker Hospital Sunday, December 1, 1918. The funeral took place Monday, December 2, from the Catholic Church in Baker. Josephine La Notte Mulvehill was born in New Orleans, May 28, 1862, and died in Baker, Oregon, December 1, 1918. She was taken suddenly ill Friday night November 29-her ailment was pronounced acute diabetes. She was rushed to St. Elizabeth’s hospital at Baker, early Saturday morning, where every possible aid was given her, but she passed away Sunday forenoon at 11 o’clock, surrounded by all her family. The Mulvehills have been residents of Oregon 21 years, residing in Union all of the time, except the last three years, when they moved to a ranch near Haines. Mrs. Mulvehill is survived by her husband, J. T. Mulvehill; two sons, Andreas and Leo, of Haines; two daughters, Mrs. Alva Peters and Mrs. Herman White, of North Powder. She was a loving and affectionate wife and mother, a kind friend and neighbor, beloved by all who knew her. The funeral services where held at Baker, Monday December 2, at 4 p. m. at St. Francis Cathedral, Rev. Father August E. Loeser officiating. The remains were shipped the same night to Portland for cremation and were accompanied by all of the immediate family. Mrs. Mulvehill was a member of Preston W. R....

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Biography of John Dovell

JOHN DOVELL. – Mr. Dovell is one of those men who have belabored fortune, and have knocked about the world until it is sufficient to turn one’s hair gray simply to listen to their adventures. A native of the Azores, of Portuguese parentage and born in 1836, he came to Portland, Maine, at the age of fourteen, and learned shipbuilding. He left in four years and plied his trade in New Orleans, shipping thence to Liverpool, and coming as ship’s carpenter from that foreign port to San Francisco. He soon came up the coast to Portland, Oregon, and worked upon the steam ferry Independence, building near the “South End Sawmill” by Powell, Coffin, “Preacher” Kelly, and Hankins, the captain, to run opposition to Stevens’ ferry. Starting for the Frazer river mines in 1859, he met a number of friends at Victoria, and, together with seventeen of them, put across the Georgian Gulf in rowboats, making a dangerous passage. They then followed up the river by the Skilloot route to Horse Beef bar, the company then separating and going to prospecting. Dovell made no strike. Some twenty of the company on the way back went down to the Littoot Lake, and in the absence of a boat to go down to Langley were compelled to take one by force from one Robertson, for which high-handed act they were arrested upon...

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