Location: Orange County VT

Biographical Sketch of Moses H. Cady

Moses H. Cady came to Stowe from Randolph, Vt., in 1830, and commenced a mercantile business under the firm name of T. B. Downer & Co. This firm did a successful business for about two years, after which Mr. Cady continued the same alone two years, then formed a co-partnership with Elisha Cady, continuing this connection about three years. He then took Thomas Emerson, of Windsor, Vt., into partnership. Mr. Emerson was a banker, and supposed to. be wealthy , but after about three years some of his speculations proved disastrous and he retired from the firm. This disaster also injured Mr. Cady, but he recovered, and continued the business alone about four years, then sold out to Thomas Downer, son of his first partner. About two years after he repurchased the store and did a general mercantile business about two years, then sold the entire business to Bennett & Robinson. This closed his mercantile career. Soon after he became interested in the manufacture of carriages, which he carried on quite extensively, till 1874, when he retired from business, and is now seventy-eight years of...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles F. Hale

Charles F. Hale, with his father, Lewis, came to Stowe from Tunbridge, Vt., in 1841, and located in the southwestern part of the town, where he remained about twenty years, then removed to the Waterbury turnpike, about two miles southwest from Stowe village. After two or three other changes Mr. Hale located where he now resides, half a mile north of the village. Lewis, his father, died in 1878, aged ninety...

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Biography of Mann, Stillman

Mann, Stillman proprietor of the Russell House. Mr. Mann erected the stone part of his hotel in the summer of 1877; it is 25×48 feet, and three stories high. There is also a wooden addition, 26×68 feet. The hotel cost $7,000. Capacity is about seventy-five guests. He first came to Russell in April 1871, with the Northwestern Colony from Eastern Wisconsin; at that time there was only a section house in the place. He, in company with H. W. Tusten, built a small shanty, and both families lived in that until other arrangements could be made. Mrs. Mann first began to bake bread and sell it to settlers, and finally, after they got more room, they began to lodge people, and that is the way the Russell House first started. The Northwestern Colony were citizens of Ripon, Oshkosh and Fond du Lac, Wis. The biographies of the most active men in this colony will appear in the history of Russell County. Dr. C. W. Bond came with the colony, but remained only a short time and returned to Wisconsin. The only meat the settlers had for over two years was buffalo, deer, antelope and elk, which roamed over the plains in vast herds, and could be shot down in any direction. Mr. Mann was born in Orange County, Vt., in 1825, where he lived until he was twenty-one years...

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Biography of Harrison Hackett

Harrison Hackett, one of the early settlers of Ida County, Iowa, was born in Orange County, Vermont, May 6, 1832. He was the son of Emery and Amanda (Hines) Hackett, both natives of Vermont, with the ancestors coming to this country from England generations ago. Harrison’s brothers and sisters were: Homer, Hellen, Henry, Angeline, Louisa, Edna, Arabell, John, Harriett, Clifton, Charley, and Augusta. Four of the brothers were in the Civil War. Harrison enlisted in June 1864 in Company G, Third Minnesota Infantry, and was mustered out in the fall of 1865 at Fort Snelling, Minnesota. When Harrison was 14 years old, he entered the employ of the Vermont Central Railroad Co., first in the shops at Northfield, Vt., afterward fired on an engine, and later had charge of one. After 6 years with the railroad company, he purchased some wild woodland in Minnesota, and developed a farm. He married in October 1852 to Almina Hatch, daughter of Henry and Nancy (Rollins) Hatch, of Vermont. They had 2 children: Alma and Augusta. He wife died February 1888. In 1876, he came to Ida County and purchased 320 acres of wild prairie land in Section 34, Silver Creek Township. He piled his furniture out on the prairie until he had his house erected. He built a frame house and began cultivating his land, making a specialty of corn. He fed...

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