Select Page

Location: Orange County VT

Biography of Frank A. Jordan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Frank A. Jordan, a veteran of the Civil War, who is carrying on a thriving business as a stone cutter in Plainfield, N.H., was born in this town, April 19, 1840, son of Anthony W. and Mercy (Root) Jordan. It is known that some of his ancestors served in the Revolutionary War. His grandfather was James Jordan, who died May 10, 1860, aged eighty-two years. He was a native of Plainfield and a son of the first member of the family to settle here. James Jordan was a contractor for the construction of roads and bridges, and also carried on a farm. He married Waitte Kenyon, of Plainfield, born in January, 1782, and reared seven sons, namely-Anthony W.; William Riley, first, Raymond K.; Wardner; Lester; Kenyon; and Jarvis -none of whom are living. The majority of them were farmers; and all became heads of families except Kenyon, who died at the age of twenty years. William Riley Jordan, first, married a Miss Esther Spaulding, of Plainfield; and six of his eight children survive. Wardner, who was overseer of the poor farm for seventeen years, married Lucy Whittaker, of Grantham, N.H.; and of his four children two are living. Lester married Luzina Stone, and had a family of eight children, none of whom are living. Jarvis was...

Read More

Biography of Loren Coburn

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Although a resident of Pescadero, the active years of Mr. Coburn’s life have been spent in the mining regions of California and the growing cities of Oakland and San Francisco. Loren Coburn was born in Berlin, Orange County, Vermont, January 11, 1826, with New England blood, a promise of future success. When ten years of age, his home was changed to Massachusetts, where he remained until he started for California in 1851. He shipped from New York on the steamer Falcon, bound for Cuba. After passing over the Isthmus of Panama he took passage on the ship Panama, arriving in San Francisco on June 1, 1851. From there he went to the northern mines, by way of Sacramento, Greenwood valleys, and remained four months at the placers, on the middle fork of the American River. On returning to San Francisco, laden with the fruits of his successful mining experience, he was induced to enter a business life. He engaged in the livery business in Oakland where he remained four years, after which he disposed of his stable and bought another in San Francisco, continuing in active business for twelve years. While still in the city, Mr. Coburn purchased the Punto del Ano Nuevo Rancho, a Spanish Grant of four leagues. After the sale of his San...

Read More

Biography of Captain Harry C. Fay

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Captain Harry C. Fay, editor-in-chief of the National Eagle, a bright and thoroughly up-to-date newspaper published in Claremont, was born in Richmond, Vt., November 30, 1830, son of Captain Nathan and Polly (Colby) Fay. Stephen Fay, his great-great-grandfather, was an early settler in Bennington, Vt., and was the father of eight children. His son John kept the Catamount Tavern, which during his day became a meeting-place for many great statesmen, who formed a legislative body, and held there meetings known as “Councils of Safety.” He, John, fell in the battle of Bennington. His son, Nathan Fay, served as a Colonel Warner’s command. Nathan, who was a cloth-dresser by trade, removed from Bennington to Richmond, Vt., about the year 1781, and established there a cloth-dressing house, which he carried on successfully for a number of years, leaving a flourishing business at the time of his death, which occurred at the age of seventy-seven. He married a daughter of Colonel Safford, a member of an old and prominent family of Bennington. Captain Nathan Fay, father of the subject of this sketch, continued the business of clothdressing after the death of his father; but, it subsequently becoming less profitable, he turned his attention in part to farming, and at the time of his death was the owner of one...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Edward Horatio Foster

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dr. Edward Horatio Foster, formerly a well-known medical practitioner of Concord, was born October 13, 1839, in Canterbury, N.H., son of David M. and Sarah (Bradley) Foster. He is a direct descendant of Reginald Foster, who settled in Ipswich, Mass., in 1635. His grandfather, Asa Foster, served in the French and Indian War, and under General Pepperell was at the capture of Louisburg. During the Revolutionary War Asa was one of General Arnold’s body-guard at the time of the General’s desertion. When he died in Canterbury in 1862, he was ninety-six years old. His son, David M. Foster, a native of Canterbury, followed the occupation of school teacher in his earlier days, and was greatly interested in politics. David’s wife, Sarah, was born in Brunswick, Me. Edward H. Foster attended public and private schools in his native town, and then entered Pittsfield, Mass. He graduated from Bowdoin College, Maine, in 1866. Dr. Foster first located in Bradford, Vt., remaining one year. For three years thereafter he was located in Marblehead, Mass. In July, 1872, after spending a year on the Pacific Coast, he came to Concord, where he practised for the remainder of his life. In politics Dr. Foster voted independently. He was President of Pass Creek Ranch Company, of Wyoming, and also of the Eureka...

Read More

Biography of Hon. Ira Colby

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Hon. Ira Colby, one of the leading lawyers of the State of New Hampshire, was born in Claremont, N.H., January 11, 1831, son of Ira and Polly (Foster) Colby, both of purely English descent. Their families in the various branches number many persons of distinction. On the maternal side he is descended from Reginald Foster, who came from Exeter, Devonshire, England, and settled in Ipswich, Essex County, Mass., in 1638. It has been stated in an account of the descendants of Joseph Stickney, which appeared in the New Hampshire Granite Monthly of July, 1892, that the family of this Reginald is honorably mentioned in “The Lay of the Last Minstrel” and “Marmion.” When Mrs. Colby was eleven years of age, her father removed with his family from Essex, Mass., to Henniker, N.H., to prevent his sons from becoming seafaring men. She there met Mr. Colby, a native of the place. They were married April 17, 1827, and immediately removed to Claremont, where they ever afterward lived. Mr. Colby was one of the most successful and enterprising farmers of his town, and was honored with many positions of trust. He served as a Selectman in the years 1858 and 1859 and as a Representative of the town in the legislature of New Hampshire in 1872 and 1873....

Read More

Biography of Hon. Wilder W. Parker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now HON. W.W. PARKER – There is no name in the city at the mouth of the Columbia better known in the business and social circles than that of Parker; and of those bearing it Wilder W. Parker wields an influence perhaps the most extended. A pioneer not only in name but also in fact, he ha brought to bear upon public affairs a mind keen, quick and powerful, and has been able to give the people the benefit of opinions carefully elaborated and lucidly stated, and held by himself with conscientious firmness. In intellect and character he is the ideal New Englander, and has found his life interest in the great political and moral development of the nation. He was born at Orange, Vermont, October 19, 1824, but removed as a child to Washington in the same state; and that town became his own until he attained his majority. Being ambitious and fond of study, he sought an education in advance of that afforded at the common schools; and for this purpose selected Newberry Seminary, an institution under the control of the Methodist denomination and deemed at the time the best equipped in Vermont. Assisting himself by teaching school in the winters, he graduated from the academic department of that seminary, and completed his course at...

Read More

Biography of John Henry Albin

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Henry Albin, one of the best known lawyers of Concord and an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, was born in Randolph, Vt., October 17, 1843, son of John and Emily (White) Albin. His ancestors on the father’s side resided in Randolph for one hundred and fifty years, and his mother’s family is one of the oldest in Merrimack County. He came here with his parents when he was twelve years old. Having completed his elementary education in the public schools of this city, he entered Dartmouth College in the fall of 1860, and graduated from that institution in the summer of 1864. Afterward he studied law with the Hon. Ira A. Eastman, ex-Judge of the New Hampshire Supreme Court, and was admitted to the bar in the spring of 1868. Beginning in the autumn of that year, he was associated with Judge Eastman until the latter’s retirement from practice in 1873. Mr. Albin then formed with the Hon. Mason W. Tappan a partnership that lasted until Mr. Tappan’s death. He subsequently became a partner with Nathaniel Martin. In 1895 Dewitt C. Howe was admitted to the firm. On September 5, 1872, Mr. Albin wedded Georgia A. Modica, of Henniker, N.H. Of his three children two are living; namely, Henry Allison and Edith Gertrude. In...

Read More

Biography of Patrick H. Coney

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In many ways the State of Kansas during the last half century had had no more interesting, patriotic, versatile figure than Patrick H. Coney of Topeka. He came to Kansas after making a brilliant record as a soldier in the Civil war. He had been extremely successful as a business man, and his interests as a business man have extended over a wide and diversified field. No man in the country had exhibited a more intense loyalty and devotion to the welfare of the veterans of the great struggle between the North and the South. Mr. Coney is a lawyer, had practiced in Topeka over thirty years, is also a vigorous writer, had been a publisher in his time, and had always made his private success subsidiary to the public welfare. He was born in Newbury, Vermont, March 10, 1848, a son of Luke and Honor Berry Coney. The genealogy of this family is traceable back to Laogare, ancestor of the Southern Hy Nials, a son of Nial of the Nine Hostages, Kings of Ireland in A. D. 379. His father, Luke Coney, was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, and emigrated to the United States in 1839. After living a time in Boston he moved to Vermont, where he married, and in 1850 went to Wayne...

Read More

Biography of Levi Livermore Tucker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Levi Livermore Tucker, late superintendent and president of the Kansas Wesleyan Business College of Salina, devoted practically his entire life to the training of young men and women for business. Fully forty years were given to that profession, and few men accomplished a more satisfying aggregate of results in this field than Professor Tucker. He was of New England birth and ancestry. The farm in Orange County, Vermont, where he was born December 10, 1853, was also the birthplace of his father, Levi Livermore Tucker, Sr., and the house that thus served as a birthplace to these two generations was also the birthplace of Professor Tucker’s oldest living child. Mr. Tucker’s mother was Betty Putnam Carleton, also a native of Vermont. His early education Mr. Tucker acquired in the Vermont Conference Seminary at Newbury, where he was graduated with the class of 1874 at the age of twenty-one. He afterwards took a two years’ course in the Troy Rosiness College of Troy, New York, and for one year taught in the Troy Conference Business College at Courtney, Vermont. Following that came three years spent as principal of the Schofield Business College of Providence, Rhode Island. For fourteen years Mr. Tucker was principal of the New Jersey Business College at Newark, then for one year had charge...

Read More

Biography of William G. Peach

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now WILLIAM G. PEACH. – There is no doubt but there should be special mention in this volume of the abiding chronicles of Union county, of the capable and venerable citizen, whose name appears at the head of this article, and it is with pleasure that we accord to him space for the epitome of an interesting and eventful career, since his abilities are worthy of such, and since his success has been achieved by meritorious effort, and since his character is upright, stanch, and worthy to be exemplified. Mr. Peach was born in the Green Mountain State, at Newbury, Orange county, on October 15, 1833, and there were spent the first nineteen years of his life. The school facilities were limited, and so our subject had the opportunity to attend school but three months in his life, which lack, however, he has amply made up for in personal research and extensive observation. At the budding age of nineteen, in company with two cousins, he embarked at New York for San Francisco, going via the isthmus route. The cost of a steerage ticket was one hundred and sixty dollars, while they paid ten cents per pound for transportation of their baggage across the isthmus. September 7 was the date they sailed from New York, and October 5...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of John Danforth Nutting

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Nutting, John Danforth; clergyman; born at Randolph, Vt., March 8, 1854; son of Rufus and Sarah H. Nutting; A. B., Wheaton (III.) College, 1878, A. M., 1881; graduate, Oberlin Theological Seminary, 1885; married, Nannie Keith Miller, of Oberlin (class 1883), June 23, 1885 (died, 1886); 2d, Lillis R. Morley, of Mentor, O., (Ohio, 1887), Jan. 1, 1890; ordained ministry in. Congregational Church, 1885; pastor, Wauseon, O., 1885-1888; Newport, Ky., 1888-1890; St. Louis, 1890-1892; Salt Lake City, 1892-1898; sec’y Utah Gospel Mission for special work in behalf of the Mormon people and against the Mormon system, since 1898; writer and lecturer on Mormonism and kindred...

Read More

Biography of Edwin Tucker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Edwin Tucker. Of pioneer Kansans and of men who made the state what it is today Greenwood County contributed no character of wider influence and of finer personality than the late Edwin Tucker. He was one of the very first pioneer settlers in the county, one of the builders of Eureka, achieved a splendid success in business affairs as a land owner and cattleman, participated in the public life of his home county and state at large, and many of the interests which he established and maintained are now being continued through his worthy son. The late Edwin Tucker was born at West Newbury, Vermont, in 1837. He died on the old farm adjoining Eureka on the south in 1911. The Tuckers came out of England, three brothers of them, and were settlers in Vermont before the Revolutionary war. Edwin Tucker’s father was David Tucker, who was born in Vermont in 1794. He moved West and became identified with the lumber industry in Wisconsin. He suffered injuries in the lumber camp which made him almost an invalid during his later years. In 1857 he came to Kansas, but lived practically retired until his death in 1869. He died on the old farm at Eureka. Reared and educated in Vermont, though finishing his schooling in Wisconsin, Edwin...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Daniel Messer

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Daniel Messer, proprietor Essex House, Mattoon; was born in Piermont, Grafton Co.. N. H., A. D. 1829; his father was a farmer, and his early life was that of a farmer’s son; in addition to his common-school education, he attended for some time a seminary of a high grade, in Bradford, Vt.; at his majority be left home, and began life for himself; his first employment was that of overseeing a force of workmen on the Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad; he subsequently contracted on the Buffalo, Corning & New York Railroad; in 1853, he came West, and contracted on the St. Louis, Alton & Terre Haute Railroad, and on the completion of the road, was appointed Roadmaster from Terre Haute to Yana, which position he held from 1855 to 1860 or 1861; on leaving the road, he next operated the Messer House, in Charleston, till 1867; from 1867 to 1869, he owned and operated a planing-mill, at Charleston; in 1869, he leased the Essex House, at, Mattoon, and has operated it for the past ten years; with a house first-class in all its appointments, and himself possessed of all those necessary qualifications that go to make a successful landlord, he has met with deserved success, and is to-day regarded one of the financially solid men...

Read More

Biography of Matthew Hale

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now MATTHEW HALE A MAN of fine legal attainments and of high personal character, who has been a steady resident of Albany for the past twenty-two years is the Hon. Matthew Hale, On the 20th of June, 1829, in the little town of Chelsea, in the state of Vermont, this well-known jurist first saw the light of day. His ancestry is in every respect a notable one – including admirable combinations of intellectual, moral and religious principles. His father, Harry Hale, was a descendant of one Thomas Hale, an English yeoman, who immigrated to this country in 1638, and settled in Newbury, Mass. Harry Hale was a leading citizen in his day, and a man of great excellence of character. He was born in 1780, and when about twenty years of age formed a partnership with his brother Nathan, and became a country merchant, first at Windsor and afterward at West Windsor, Vt. He removed to Chelsea, Vt., where he still carried on a country store under the firm-name of Hale & Dickinson. A few years before the birth of his son Matthew, he retired from trade and devoted himself to the management of a grist mill and to farming. He was a captain of the militia, held various town offices; and in 1828, ’32, and ’36,...

Read More

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest