Location: Ontario County NY

Baxter Family of Norwich Vermont

The Baxters of this town came here from Norwich, Connecticut, a town which their ancestors with others from Norwich, England, assisted in founding about the year 1632. Elihu Baxter, with his young wife, Tryphena Taylor, to whom he was married October 24, 1777, arrived in Norwich the same year, and here fifteen children (six daughters and nine sons) were born to them, twelve of whom lived to grow up and have families of their own. Mr. Baxter settled on the farm that subsequently became the home of Hon. Paul Brigham. He later removed to the farm where Orson Sargent lives, and there built himself a frame house, a part of which is now in use by the present owner of the property. Of his children: William Baxter, the eldest, born August 3, 1778, studied law with Hon. Daniel A. Buck of Norwich, and removed to Bennington, Vt., where he soon became the leading lawyer in that part of the state, and received many honors from his town and county. He married Lydia Ashley of Norwich, August 17, 1779, and died at Bennington October 1, 1826, aged forty nine years. Hiram Baxter settled in Bennington a little after 1800. Elihu Baxter, Jr., the third child, born in 1781, died at Portland, Me., in 1863, where he had been in the practice of medicine for many years. Chester Baxter, born in...

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Biography of Rev. Isaac G. Hubbard

Rev. Isaac G. Hubbard, at one time the rector of Trinity Church, Claremont, was born here, April 13, 1818, son of Isaac and Ruth (Cobb) Hubbard. His grandfather, George Hubbard, who was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War, came to Claremont in 1778 from Tolland, Conn. Judge J. H. Hubbard, of Windsor, a son of George, was one of the ablest lawyers in New England. He was a powerful man, and as a pleader at the bar he had few equals. Isaac Hubbard, another son, who settled in Claremont, became a successful farmer and stock-raiser. He was an influential man, served in different town offices, did much legal work, was Justice of the Peace, was considered a practical lawyer, and was prominent in the Episcopal church. He died in January, 1861, leaving a fine estate of some four hundred acres. By his first wife, a daughter of Ezra Jones, there was one child, a daughter, who married Charles F. Long, and had four children: Caroline, who died young; Charles H.; Isaac G.; and Charlotte B. The three last named are still living. His second wife, in maidenhood Ruth Cobb, daughter of Samuel Cobb, of Springfield, Vt., had four children. Amos, the eldest, now deceased, who was in the nursery business in Detroit, Mich., married Catharine, daughter of Samuel Fiske. She was half-sister of Philip Fiske, the donor of the...

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Genealogy of Joseph Baker of Marshfield Massachusetts

Z173. NICHOLAS BAKER: probable father of Z174 SAMUEL BAKER: made Freeman in 1657; m. Eleanor Winslow. Z175 KENELIN BAKER: b. 1657; m. Sarah Bradford. Z176. KENELIN BAKER: b. 1695; m. Patience Dolen. Z177 WILLIAM BAKER: b. Oct. 16, 1734; m. Hannah Lincoln. Z178 WILLIAM BAKER: b. Sept. 10, 1759; m. Abigail Low. Z179 JOSEPH BAKER: b. Marshfield, Mass., Sept. 24, 1794; m. Olive Cushing. Z180 JOSEPH BAKER: b. Marshfield, Mass., Feb. 27, 1827; m. Martha Jane Perrin. Sarah James: b. Thompson, Conn. a181 JAMES BAKER: b. Nov. 28, 1824; m. Lydia Ann Mentzer, b. Jan. 8, 1826; had John, James, Emma, Susie and Abraham. Abraham: b. July 21, 1860; m. Sophia Jane Graham (b. 1864) on Dec. 23, 1885. William: b. 1887; m. Elizabeth Fry. Beuford. James. Ralph: b. 1889. Arthur: b. 1890. b182. JACOB HULL BAKER: b. Jan. 10, 1838, in Allegany Co., Md.; m. Julia Harriett Dudley of Virginia. She was born Feb. 20, 1858, in Glade Hill. Was a breeder of thoroughbred horses; d. 1903. Thomas Dudley: b. Nov. 6, 1898, at Lyons, Mont. Graduate of the Montana State School of Mines in 1923. Mining engineer for the Anaconda Copper Mining Co. of Butte. Mary H.: b. Jan. 18, 1900, at Lyons, Mont.% 9Graduate of the University of Washington, and teacher of Art at the Montana State Normal School. c183 O. O. BAKER: descendant of a...

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Biography of Gustavus Charles Wilkins

Forty-two years ago Gustavus Charles Wilkens, a native of the fair land of Poland, left the dominion of the Czar to seek his fortune in America, and being favorably impressed with the possibilities open to him in this country he lost no time in renouncing his allegiance to the Russian government. Mr. Wilkens belongs to a race of liberty-loving people who have long cherished an ardent desire to regain their national independence, but the iron hand of imperial Russia still holds them in subjection. His father, Ludwig Wilkens, born in 1801, was in the service of the Russian government, having been at the mint for some time, and subsequently had full charge of large pulp and paper mills in Warsaw, Sacifa and Bozizno. In addition to his business ability he possessed a varied knowledge of the world and its affairs in general, having circumnavigated the globe, but his career of progress was cut short by his untimely death, which occurred when he was forty-seven years old. Ludwig Wilkens was married in 1842 to Caroline Teichman, who was born in Modzerowo, Poland, March 4, 1820, and is still living. Her father was the owner of three large freight boats plying on the Vistula river, which were destroyed by the Russian government forces during the Polish rebellion of 1830. Caroline (Teichman) Welkins’ mother was before marriage, Minnie Anglehart, born in Vloclawek,...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert F. Thompson

Robert F. Thompson, son of Lieutenant Lester P. Thompson and Sarah Jane (Foster) Thompson, was born in Canandaigua, New York, July 31, 1870. He received his preliminary school training in Phelps, followed by a course of study in Canandaigua Academy, from which he was graduated. He studied for his chosen profession in the law department of Michigan University, from which he received his degree of Bachelor of Laws, and then took a post-graduate course, receiving the Master’s degree in 1893. He was admitted to the bar, December, 1894, in Ontario county, New York, and at once entered upon practice at Canandaigua. In 1899 he was elected district attorney, and in this responsible position gained reputation as a trial lawyer and advocate of unusual ability. He engaged in law practice in partnership with Frank A. Christian, January 1, 1900, and retired from that office December 31, 1905. In 1908 he was unanimously nominated by his party for the office of county judge, was elected, and is now (1910) filling that place. That he was esteemed fit for the position is evidenced by the fact that no opposition was arrayed against him and no other candidate was nominated to contest the place with him, a most unusual circumstance. In addition to his professional labors judge Thompson devotes much attention to community affairs, and is actively interested in some of the most...

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Second Treaty of June 30, 1802

At a treaty held under the authority of the United States, at Buffalo Creek in the county of Ontario, and state of New York, between the Sachems, Chiefs and Warriors of the Seneca Nation of Indians, on behalf of said nation, and Oliver Phelps, Esq. of the county of Ontario, Isaac Bronson, Esq. of the city of New York, and Horatio Jones, of the said county of Ontario, in the presence of John Tayler, Esq. Commissioner appointed by the President of the United States for holding said treaty. Know all men by these presents, that the said Sachems, Chiefs and Warriors, for and in consideration of the sum of twelve hundred dollars, lawful money of the United States, unto them in hand paid by the said Oliver Phelps, Isaac Bronson and Horatio Jones, at or immediately before the sealing and delivery hereof, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, HAVE and by these presents DO grant, remise, release and forever quit claim and confirm unto the said Oliver Phelps, Isaac Bronson and Horatio Jones, and to their heirs and assigns, ALL that tract of land commonly called and known by the name of Little Beard’s Reservation, situate, lying and being in the said county of Ontario, bounded on the East by the Genesee river and Little Beard’s Creek, on the south and west by other lands of the said parties...

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Biographical Sketch of James M. Stanley

James M. Stanley was born in Canandaigua, New York, January 17, 1814; died April 10, 1872. He moved to Michigan in 1835 and became a portrait painter in Detroit; two years later removed to Chicago. About this time he visited the “Indian Country” in the vicinity of Fort Snelling, and there made many sketches. Returned to the eastern cities, where he spent several years, but in 1842 again went west and began his wanderings over the prairies far beyond the Mississippi, reaching Texas and New Mexico. His Buffalo Hunt on the Southwestern Prairies was made in 1845. From 1851 to 1863 Stanley lived in Washington, D. C., during which time he endeavored to have the Government purchase the many paintings which he had made of Indians and of scenes in the Indian country, but unfortunately he was not successful. His pictures were hanging in the Smithsonian Building, and on January 24, 1865, when a large part of the building was ruined by fire, only five of his pictures escaped destruction, they being in a different part of the structure. The five are now in the National Museum, including the large canvas shown in plate...

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Biographical Sketch of Frederick Augustine Sterling

Sterling, Frederick Augustine; merchant; born, Chapinville, Conn., May 26, 1831; son of Frederick Augustine and Caroline Mary (Dutcher) Sterling; educated, public and private schools, Geneva, N. Y.; married, Meadville, Pa., May 13, 1856, Emma Betts; issue, one son, living in Erie, Pa.; merchant in Cleveland since 1850; connected with T. S. Beckwith & Co., Beckwith, Sterling & Co., Sterling & Co., The Sterling & Welch Co., pres. the Sterling & Welch Co., director Union National Bank; director Citizens Savings & Trust Co.; vice pres. Cleveland Burial Case Co.; pres. Board of Trustees, Second Presbyterian Church; member Union and Country Clubs. Favorite pastime:...

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Biography of Clarence Case Goddard, M. D.

Clarence Case Goddard, M. D. While Doctor Goddard now gives all his time and attention to the Evergreen Place Hospital at Leavenworth, a high class sanitarium for nervous and mental troubles, liquor and drug habits, he had occupied such a disguished position in Kansas medical circles for so many years that hardly any name in the profession is more widely known and more highly honored. In 1911 he was elected president of the Kansas State Medical Society. He served four terms as president of the County Medical Society, had been the president of the District Society, had been a delegate from Kansas to the American Medical Association, and he had also contributed a number of articles, based upon his individual experience as a specialist in nervous and mental diseases, to the medical journals of the country. Doctor Goddard is a member of the Burlington Railway Surgeons Association, was for many years a surgeon for that company, and held the chair of Nervous and Mental Diseases in the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Kansas City, Kansas, now the department of the State University, for four years when he resigned. He had also been a professor in the Post-Graduate Medical School and Clinic of Kansas City, Missouri. Doctor Goddard had been a resident of Kansas more than fifty-seven years. He came with his parents to Leavenworth in 1860, and that...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Moreau Harger

Charles Moreau Harger, Kansas editor and old time resident of the state, is known to thousands of people outside Kansas through his writings in magazines and through his active participation in several movements recognized as of national scope. He was born in Phelps, New York, in 1863, came west to Dickinson County in 1879 with his parents, and had resided in Abilene since that date. He was educated in a classical school. For several years he was a farmer and rancher, then teacher, being principal of the Hope City schools in 1887-88. He then became a reporter on the Abilene Daily Reflector and had been its editor for twenty-five years. Outside of newspaper work he had found time to contribute many articles on western financial and social topics and some fiction to the Century, Harper’s Magazine, Scribner’s, North American Review, Atlantic, Outlook, Saturday Evening Post, Independent and other magazies. He had edited several books. Honorary literary degrees have been conferred on him by Bethany College and Baker University. He was director and lecturer of the Department of Journalism of the University of Kansas 1905-10 and president of the National Association of Teachers of Journalism in 1909; was president of the Kansas Citizens’ League for the Promotion of a Sound Banking System, 1912-14; is a director of the Abilene National Bank; was member of the State Board of Corrections 1913-16...

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Aikey, Virgil – Obituary

Sumpter, Oregon Virgil Aikey, 66, of Sumpter, died Oct. 16, 2004, at the Boise Veterans Hospital. There will be a wake in honor of his life at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Elkhorn Restaurant in Sumpter. Virgil was born on Aug. 7, 1938, at Canandaigua, N.Y. He moved to Southern California in 1960. He served in the U.S. Army in the 101st Airborne. He was the youngest journeyman in the heating and sheet metal business in the 1960s in Southern California. After that he became a swimming pool contractor for Bee Sunny Pools in Chatsworth, Calif. In 1988, he moved to Bend, and then to Sumpter in 1993. He spent the winters at Yuma, Ariz. In 1986, he married Jo, his best friend. Survivors include his wife; sons, Virgil and Robert; daughter, Becky; stepson, Keith; stepdaughters, Tammy and Mary Jo; four grandchildren; seven stepgrandchildren; and last, but not least, his very special friend, Lil Bit. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association through Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St., Baker City, OR 97814. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, October 22, 2004 Transcribed by: Belva...

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Maher, Kimberly Ann Maynard Mrs. – Obituary

Kimberly Ann Maher, 42, of Wheatland, Wyo., a former Baker City resident, died Jan. 1, 2004, at the Wyoming Medical Center. Her memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday at St. Anthony’s Catholic Church. The Rev. Michael Carr will officiate. Kimberly was born on May 24, 1961, at Canandagua, N.Y., to Kenneth and Nancy Lawless Maynard. She was raised and attended school at Lander, Wyo. She moved to Casper, Wyo., on Oct. 7, 1992. She married Douglas Doc Burton Maher at Natural Bridge. She worked as a licensed social worker for the Platte County Sheriff’s Department. She also was employed by the Hemry Home at Casper, and at New Directions Northwest in Baker City. She enjoyed crafts, camping, cooking, traveling, whale watching on the coast and spending time with friends, family and her granddaughter. Survivors include her husband of Wheatland; her children, Joshua Derek of Casper, John Douglas of Spokane, Wash., Angel Dawn of Evansville, Wyo., Timothy David of Casper and Crystal Dawn of California; two sisters, Kathy and Kara, both of Casper; and two brothers, Kenneth of Rock Springs, Wyo., and Kevin of Lander, Wyo. Memorial contributions may be made to the Hemry Home Scholarship Fund, 5223 S. Beech St., Casper, WY 82601. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, January 9, 2004 Transcribed by: Belva...

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Biographical Sketch of R. J. A. Mack

R. J. A. Mack, of Redlands, is a native of Syracuse, New York, born June 24, 1842. He received his education in the schools of Syracuse and Fulton, New York, and commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Townsend, of Syracuse; he also attended and graduated at the college at Geneva. He began practice at Syracuse, afterward continuing at Rochester, and later at Lyons, New York. Thence he removed to Chicago, where he attended Bennett Medical College (Eclectic), graduating in 1876. He practiced in Chicago until 1886, when he removed to California, and on the 9th of November of that year settled in Redlands; being one of the Chicago colonies that located here. He conducted the Prospect House a year and a half, practicing also at the time. He then built his present handsome residence, on a tract of one and a half acres which he purchased. He has 40,000 orange seedbed stock, 2,000 of last year’s buds and 6,000 of this year’s buds, on his home place. He also has ten acres of land in the Crafton District, part of which is already planted to oranges, and the remainder will be in 1890. Dr. Mack was married November 26, 1876, to Annetta Bishop, a native of New York City. They have three children living, viz.: John A., Jr.; Roy A. and Raymond. One is deceased, Grace, aged seven...

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Biographical Sketch of William B. Parmele

WILLIAM B. PARMELE, of North Adams, prominent in the progress of Western Massachusetts, in connection with the production and distribution of lumber, is bearing an eminently practical part in present day affairs, and as a forward looking executive his work is counting definitely for the general welfare. Mr. Parmele is an able and efficient executive, and his usefulness is well appraised by his success. He is a son of G. N. and M. E. (Speaker) Parmele, both natives and long residents of the State of New York. William B. Parmele was born in East Bloomfield, New York, September 12, 1859. His education was begun in the local schools and completed at Canandaigua Academy, also of this State. Coming to North Adams as a young man, Mr. Parmele associated himself with the S. B. Dibble Lumber Company, and throughout his entire career he has continued with this concern. This is a long and worthy record of consistent purpose and tireless endeavor, and his work has counted largely for the progress and extension of the company’s interests. Beginning in a subordinate capacity and familiarizing himself with the details of the business, Mr. Parmele rose steadily in the organization until he now serves as treasurer of the concern. He is not widely affiliated with affairs, outside the business world, but is a member of the Berkshire Club and attends the First Congregational...

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Biographical Sketch of Captain Samuel Hayes

(III) Captain Samuel (2), son of Samuel (1) and Elizabeth (Willcockson) Hayes, was born in Simsbury, March 26, 1730, died in Granby, December 25, 1801. In the Simsbury records he is designated captain. In 1753 he erected a substantial dwelling-house at Bushy Hill, two miles west of Salmon Brook, which he and his descendants occupied for nearly a century. He was a selectman of Simsbury, 1774, and of Granby at its organization, 1786; represented Simsbury in the general assembly, 1778; served as deacon of the church at Salmon Brook from 1786 to ’80. He possessed superior physical strength, excelled in all athletic sports and was one of the most prominent and highly respected citizens of his day. In 1750 he married Rosanna, eldest daughter of Judah and Hannah (Buttolph) Holcombe, of Simsbury, and a descendant in the fifth generation of Thomas Buttolph, who landed in Boston from the “Abigail, ” 1635. Rosanna was born in Simsbury, June 24, 1732, and died in Granby, November 8, 1814. Children : 1. Rosanna, born March 6, 1751 ; died in 1770; married Benjamin Hayes, her cousin. 2. Seth, born June 2, 1753. 3. Theodosia, April 16, 1757; died at Delaware, Ohio, 1834; married, at Granby, General Chauncey Pettibone, son of Colonel Ozias’ Pettibone. 4. Samuel, born May 20, 1759. 5. Temperance, December 14, 1761 ; died in Connecticut, 1787; married Luther Foote....

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