Location: Onondaga County NY

Onondaga Tribe

Onondaga Indians, Onondaga Nation, Onondaga First Nation, Onondaga People (Onoñtǎ’´ge‘,’on, or on top of, the hill or mountain’). An important tribe of the Iroquois confederation, formerly living on the mountain, lake, and creek bearing their name, in the present Onondaga County, New York, and extending northward to Lake Ontario and southward perhaps to the waters of the Susquehanna. In the Iroquois councils they are known as Hodiseñnageta, ‘they (are) the name bearers.’ Their principal village, also the capital of the confederation, was called Onondaga, later Onondaga Castle; it was situated from before 1654 to 1681 on Indian hill, in the present town of Pompey, and in 1677 contained 140 cabins. It was removed to Butternut Creek, where the fort was burned in 1696. In 1720 it was again removed to Onondaga Creek, and their present reserve is in that valley, a few miles south of the lake 1Beauchamp, inf’n, 1907 . Onondaga Tribe History Champlain related that in 1622 the Montagnais, the Etchemin, and the Hurons had been engaged for a long time in seeking to bring about peace between themselves and the Iroquois, but that up to that time there was always some serious obstacle to the consummation of an agreement on account of the fixed distrust which each side had of the faith of the other. Many times did they ask Champlain himself to aid them in...

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Biography of Charles McHugh

Among those prominent in business, social and club life in the City of Rock Island, is Charles McHugh, a man who through persistent industry and commercial acumen has wrought for himself a successful career. His parents were Thomas Edwin and Ellen (House) McHugh. His mother was born in Syracuse, New York; his father was a native of Inniskillin, Ireland, but removed to this country, where the subject of this sketch was born September 3, 1863, at Syracuse, New York. Four years later his parents came west and located at Tiskilwa, in this State, where his mother is still living. Here their son received a common school education. Mr. McHugh remained in Tiskilwa until 1881, when he came to Rock Island. Seeking employment, he obtained a position as bell-boy at the Harper House, the hotel of which he is today manager and associate proprietor, but which was then owned and managed by the late Benjamin Harper. As a bell-boy Mr. McHugh received the princely salary of ten dollars a month, but with a firm determination to deserve and to attain a higher position he paid diligent attention to his duties. This determination upon his part was rewarded by a promotion to a position as clerk in the hotel, which position he held until 1894 when he, together with J. E. Montrose, purchased the management of the hotel from the Harper...

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Biography of Daniel Johnson

DANIEL JOHNSON. – Among the pioneers of Oregon, no one bore a better reputation than the subject of this sketch, whose doors were always open to the homeless stranger, and whose memory will be fondly cherished by the many who have been sheltered and fed by him. Daniel Johnson was born in 1812 in Berkshire county, Massachusetts, and at ten years of age removed with his parents to Onondaga county, New York, remaining with them some thirteen years, and doing any kind of work he could get to do. However, during the latter part of this time, he labored at stone-masonry. Right here we cannot forbear citing the reader to one piece of labor performed by him. In 1883 H. Johnson, son of Daniel, while traveling through that section of New York, paid a visit to an old fashioned cobble-stone house built by his father in the year 1835, and which is really as firm and solid as when it was first completed, the couple for whom it was built still occupying it. In the year 1837, Mr. Johnson, leaving friends and home, struck out for the “old West.” Arriving in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, he labored at masonry, plastering, as foreman in a large pork-packing establishment, and breaking prairie lands, until 1844, within which time he had accumulated property to the value of about seven hundred dollars. During the...

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Biography of James Johnson

JAMES JOHNSON. – James Johnson, a pioneer of 1844, son of James Johnson of Berkshire county, Massachusetts, was born on his father’s farm in 1814, and as a child moved with his parents to a new home in Onondaga county, New York, living there until he attained his manhood. In 1836 he gave rein to the desire for change and adventure and freedom, which ultimately made of him one of the early pioneers of Oregon, going in that year with his brother Daniel to Tippecanoe county, Indiana, and engaging in work as carpenter near Lafayette. In the winters, when there was little building on hand, he gave attention to pork-packing, becoming an expert and commanding a good salary. In 1839 he began a substantial domestic life, marrying Miss Juliet, daughter of Eli Perkins of Tippecanoe county. During these and the following years, however, he was hearing much about the great new West, the land of Oregon; and his natural craving to form and enjoy a career unhampered by the restrictions of life in the older communities made him anxious to come to the Pacific coast. In 1844 he was able to accomplish his purpose. In April, in company with his brother Daniel, and with John and Eli Perkins and Ruel Olds, he procured his outfit and proceeded to the rendezvous near Independence. There they found a considerable company assembled,...

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Biographical Sketch of John Richmond

(I) John Richmond, the immigrant, said to have been bore in Wiltshire, at Ashton, Keynes, where the old Richmond manor house is still standing, was baptized there in 1597. He came to America about 1635, and was one of the purchasers of Taunton, Massachusetts, in 1637. George Richmond, possibly a cousin, was engaged in business in Saco, Maine, in 1635 and John may have been there also before coming to Taunton. John is mentioned in court records March 7, 1636, showing that at that time he was engaged in trade, and it is thought he may have returned to England. He returned to Taunton, however, and died there, March 20, 1664, aged seventy years. His name is often on the court records in 1636-37. He was of Newport for a time, and one of the commissioners from that town in 1656. He took the oath of fidelity in Taunton before 1640. The part of the town where he owned land is still called Richmondtown. His will is dated December 14, 1663, and was proved October 29, 1669. Children: John, born about 1627; Edward, mentioned elsewhere; Sarah, 1638; Mary,...

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Biographical Sketch of Collins F. Tillotson

Collins F. Tillotson was a farmer of Maple Township, Ida County, Iowa. He purchased wild prairie land in February, 1874, when he came to Ida County and resided on 417 acres in Section 18. He was born in Onondaga County, New York, December 7, 1846. His father was Sanford P. Tillotson born in Connecticut and was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. His mother was, before her marriage, Miss Nancy Jane Ward. His grandfather, David Tillotson, was a native of Connecticut and served in the war of 1812. Collins was reared in New York and received his education in the common schools and at Monroe Collegiate Institute, Elbridge, New York. He attended Faley Seminary at Fulton, New York. He had a nice frame dwelling on his land, along with a barn, crib building, and hog house with a lean-to. He had cattle sheds, stock scales, windmill, and piping leading to the different yards. At the age of 24 years, Mr. Tillotson married in Onondaga County, New York to Miss Mary J. Clark. Mary was the daughter of Newton and Phoebe (Sprague) Clark. They had six children: Jessie, Fred, Charley, Francis, Mertie, and...

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Biographical Sketch of E. B. Baird

He was born in Onondaga County, New York, November 6, 1837, and was raised on a farm. In 1872, he came to Iowa and bought land in Maple Township, Ida County, Iowa. Mr. Baird was married at age of 30 to Harriet Conover, daughter of Isaac Talmage, in Scholarie County, New York. Their child was Edmund C. Baird. Mr. Baird married Matilda Preston in 1877. She was the daughter of John Preston, who was born and educated in Scotland. They had three children: Andrew E., Preston, and Mabel Laura. E. C. Baird was vice president and director of the Maple Valley Savings Bank and served as a member of the Maple Township School Board. His father was Andrew W. Baird and he was born in Scholarie County, New York. His mother was Harriet Bramhall Baird and she died when he was 4 years old. Then his father married her sister, Jane Bramhall, and they had one child,...

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