Location: Omaha Reservation

Omaha Tribe History in Nebraska

The Omaha, so far as known, formerly dwelt in villages composed of dwellings made of sod and timber. The illustration gives the outward appearance of these dwellings, which are built by setting carefully selected and prepared posts closely together in a circle and binding them firmly with willows, then backing them with dried grass and covering the entire structure with closely packed sods. The roof is made in the same manner, having an additional support of an inner circle of posts, with crotches to hold the cross logs which act as beams to the dome-shaped roof. A circular opening...

Read More

Winnebago Tribe

Winnebago Indians, Winnebago Nation (winǐpig, ‘filthy water’ [Chippewa]; winǐpyägohagi, ‘people of the filthy water’ [Sauk and Fox]. W. J.) A tribe of the Siouan linguistic family. Winnebago Tribe History The Winnebago have been known to the whites since 1634, when the Frenchman Nicollet found them in Wisconsin, on Green bay, at which time they probably extended to Lake Winnebago. At this period they were found wedged in by Central Algonquian tribes, particularly by the Sauk and Foxes and the Menominee. To the west they were in intimate contact with a kindred tribe, the Iowa, who in turn were neighbors of the Oto and Missouri. These four tribes, the Winnebago, Iowa, Oto, and Missouri, speak dialects naturally intelligible to one another, and show many cultural similarities. On the other hand, the Winnebago show many cultural similarities with their Central Algonquian neighbors, particularly in all that pertains to material culture and art, and this double influence, that from their Siouan neighbors and that from their Algonquian neighbors, must be borne in mind in any attempt to understand properly the Winnebago culture. It is stated in the Jesuit Relation for 1671 1Jesuit Relation 1671, 42, 1858 that the Winnebago had always dwelt in the Green Bay region. Allouez spent the winter of 1669-70 at Green Bay, preaching to the Potawatomi, Menominee, Sauk, Foxes, and Winnebago, whom he, found commingled there. The map of...

Read More

Map of Omaha Indian Reservation, Nebraska

Showing portion thereof appraised for sale, and portion retained and allotted the Omaha Indians in severalty for the years 1905-1906. The map of the Omaha Indian Reservation in Thurston Nebraska was split into 9 pages in the original manuscript and is presented as they had it split. The numbers listed on the maps below are only a rough idea.  Find the name of the person you are searching for and then look on the map to find the location. All land is is Thurston County, Nebraska. Map 1 31 45 47 48 104 122 144-150  197 418 485 497 545 547 572-594  622 701 733 766 Map 2 1-143 and 163, 220, 221, 249, 306, 608, 681, 809, 815, 918 Map 3 139 618-808 and 1420-1536 Map 4 160-432 and 1639-1691 Map 5 433-616 and 1693-1785 Map 6 812-925 and 1537-1637 Map 7 927-977 and 1365-1418 Map 8 978-999 and 1009-1099 and 1200-1360 Map 9 1104-1195 Anderson, O. C. 1406 Ashley, J. R. 123, 130, 132, 133 Atkin, Louise Paul 1430 Ballou, Kate 1455 Barber, F. B. 674, 1451, 1454 Barber, J. L. 386, 1267 Barnaby, Josaphine 1618 Baxter, Amos 939, 1348 Baxter, Bertie 936, 987 Baxter, Chas. 1349 Baxter, Chris 1343 Baxter, David 937 Baxter Fannie P. 1273 Baxter, Harry 934, 1078 Baxter, Harry 934, 1078 Baxter, John 134, 944 Baxter, Lenora S. 1300 Baxter, Louisa White 563 Baxter,...

Read More


Linguistically the Winnebago Indians are closely related to the ŧΩiwe’re on the one side and to the Mandan on the other. They were first mentioned in the Jesuit Relation of 1636, though the earliest known use of the name Winnebago occurs in the Relation of 1640; Nicollet found them on Green bay in 1639. According to Shea, the Winnebago were almost annihilated by the Illinois (Algonquian) tribe in early days, and the historical group was made up of the survivors of the early battles. Chauvignerie placed the Winnebago on Lake Superior in 1736, and Jefferys referred to them and the Sac as living near the head of Green bay in 1761; Carver mentions a Winnebago village on a small island near the eastern end of Winnebago lake in 1778. Pike enumerated seven Winnebago villages existing in 1811; and in 1822 the population of the tribe was estimated at 5,800 (including 900 warriors) in the country about Winnebago lake and extending thence southwestward to the Mississippi. By treaties in 1825 and 1832 they ceded their lands south of Wisconsin and Fox rivers for a reservation on the Mississippi above the Oneota; one of their villages in 1832 was at Prairie la Grosse. They suffered several visitations of smallpox; the third, which occurred in 1836, carried off more than a quarter of the tribe. A part of the people long remained...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest