Location: Omaha Nebraska

General History of the Western Indian Tribes 1851-1870 – Indian Wars

Up to 1851, the immense uninhabited plains east of the Rocky Mountains were admitted to be Indian Territory, and numerous tribes roamed from Texas and Mexico to the Northern boundary of the United States. Then came the discovery of gold in California, drawing a tide of emigration across this wide reservation, and it became necessary, by treaty with the Indians, to secure a broad highway to the Pacific shore. By these treaties the Indians were restricted to certain limits, but with the privilege of ranging, for hunting purposes, over the belt thus re-reserved as a route of travel. The...

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Biographical Sketch of Harry H. Putnam

After months of travel in the United States looking for a business opening, Harry H. Putnam, contractor and builder of Redwood City, chose California as the state offering the most to the newcomer. He then spent two years deciding beyond a doubt that the peninsula offered him more opportunities than any other place in the state and that for one in his line, Redwood City was the logical place to locate. Since coming to Redwood City, Mr. Putnam has developed a large contracting and building business. He has erected 10 homes in the Redwood Highlands district alone and his contracts for houses and other structures are strung along from Redwood City to San Jose. A number of the attractive places in Stanford Park are being built by Mr. Putnam. Mr. Putnam came west after considerable experience in building and contracting lines. He was in business in Omaha for several years, where he built a number of homes. Harry H. Putnam is a native of Nebraska and was born on May 28, 1885. After graduating from the Omaha High School, he took a course at the University of Nebraska. He was married at Omaha on September 10, 1904. Mr. Putnam is a member of the Masons and the Woodmen of the World, and also a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Frat. He resides with his family at 712 Brewster...

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Biographical Sketch of Ernest L. Norberg

Architect Ernest L. Norberg and his associate, Architect Thomas M. Edwards, with offices in the Phelan Building, San Francisco, have through their branch office in the Bank Building at Burlingame established a thriving clientele in this community. Judging from the number of public and private buildings already constructed from their designs and under their supervision, the future prominence of this firm is assured. Mr. Norberg’s early architectural training was obtained at Hopkins Art Institute, and later under the American Society of Beaux Arts. He was afterward associated with the most prominent architects of San Francisco, including Willis Polk, whom he assisted in designing such magnificent structures as the new Lobart Building and the Templeton Crocker residence in Hillsborough. Mr. Norberg is well known in Club circles, being a member of the San Mateo Elks, Peninsula Club, California Auto Association, the San Francisco Architects Club and was recently highly honored by being elected a Chapter Member of the American Institute of Architects. lie has always taken active interest in public affairs and is at present a member of the Burlingame Park Commission. Mr. Norberg is a native of Omaha, Nebraska, but has resided in San Mateo County for the past nine...

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Biographical Sketch of Amos Hinsdale Plumb

Amos Hinsdale Plumb is one of the children of the late Senator Preston B. Plumb and Caroline (Southwick) Plumb. He was born at Emporia, January 31, 1869, He was educated in the public schools of Emporia and the Kansas State University at Lawrence. Mr. Plumb’s chief business activities have been in real estate and mining. He organized and is president of the Mutual Building and Loan Association of Emporia, and during 1915-17 was president of the building and loan section of the Kansas Bankers’ Association. He was married at Omaha, Nebraska, January 1, 1897, to Elva Lawrence Gibson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Gibson of Omaha. They have one daughter, Roxanna...

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Biographical Sketch of David Gladstone Page

David Gladstone Page, son of Thomas Page, whose career as one of the leading millers of Kansas has been sketched on preceding pages, is a native of Topeka, and for the past fifteen years has been closely identifled with the Page milling interests of that city. He was born January 7, 1881, at the family home at 831 North Quincy Street in Topeka. His early training was acquired in the public schools, and in 1899 he graduated from the Topeka High School. After two years as a farmer he entered his father’s office in 1900, and for a number of years has held the position of secretary of the Thomas Page Milling Company and is the wheat buyer and sales manager for the firm. In 1912 David G. Page married Miss Mary Sherrard Kerr of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Her father, Dr. David Ramsay Kerr, is a widely known educator. In May, 1916, he was elected president of Bellevue College at Omaha, Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. Page are the parents of two sons: Thomas Page and David Ramsay...

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Biography of Bernard P. Bogy

Along various lines of activity Bernard P. Bogy has taken part in those interests which have featured in the business development and the political and civic interests of St. Louis. He is a representative of one of the oldest families of the city. Bernard Pratte, one of his great-grandfathers in the paternal line, was the first mayor of the incorporated City of St. Louis, filling the office in 1844. His grandfather, Louis V. Bogy, was United States senator from Missouri, serving as a member of the upper house of the national legislature for six years. He, too, was born in Missouri and spent his entire life in this state. He gave his political allegiance at all times to the democratic party and passed away September 20, 1877. Among the ancestors of Bernard P. Bogy was Pierre Laclede, the founder of St. Louis. His father, Joseph Bogy, a native of this city, was for many years engaged in the banking and insurance business and was also identified with railroad interests, becoming chairman of the executive board of the Wabash Railroad. He died June 20, 1907. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Eliza Kimball, was born in Galena, Illinois, and through the maternal line Bernard P. Bogy is descended from General Thomas J. Hunt, who served in the Revolutionary war and was a close companion of Washington. He lies...

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Biography of Elisha Wesley McComas, Hon.

While the years of his greatest activity and achievement, the period which made him a national figure, were spent in other localities, a special interest attaches to the career of Elisha W. McComas in Kansas, not only because he lived in that state for many years, but members of his family still reside there. He was born in Cabell County in Old Virginia, the second in a family of six sons. His father was a prominent man in Old Virginia, served several terms in Congress, filled a position on the local bench, and other places of honor. The early life of Governor McComas was spent in that portion of Virginia which subsequently became the war-born State of West Virginia. He was educated chiefly in Ohio and was admitted to the bar in the Commonwealth of Virginia in 1841. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico he was commissioned a captain in the Eleventh Virginia Infantry and served throughout the war. He was at one time wounded and taken prisoner and received his honorable discharge July 20, 1848. After the Mexican war he took up the practice of law, and as a brilliant young Southerner naturally drifted into politics. He was elected to the Virginia Legislature, and in 1855 had the distinction of being chosen lieutenant governor of Virginia on the ticket with Governor Henry A. Wise. He resigned...

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Biography of William W. Driggs, Jr.

William W. Driggs, Jr.,is a capable young newspaper man and is now editor of the Bern Gazette in Nemaha county. The Gazette is one of the live papers of that county, and was established in 1898 by M. E. Ford. The editor of the paper was born in Hannibal, Missouri, December 25, 1891. His father is William W. Driggs, Sr., and together they make the firm Driggs & Driggs, publishers of the Bern Gazette. The senior Driggs was born March 25, 1856, in Pennsylvania. At the age of fifteen he learned telegraphy and began working soon afterward as a railroad telegrapher in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Michigan, Wisconsin and Missouri, and served as general passenger and ticket agent for the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railway when that line was in the bands of a receiver. He subsequently lived at Omaha, Nebraska, and for several years was secretary of the building and loan association there. Coming to Kansas in 1895, he entered the service of the Rock Island Railroad Company and was its agent at Berwick, later at McFarland, and for seven years at Phillipsburg, Kansas. In 1905 he removed to Bern and in March of that year engaged in the hotel business. After two years he resumed employment with the Rock Island Road, on which Bern is a station, and then in 1908 bonght the Bern Gazette. He had been...

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Biography of Hon. Joseph A. Kuhn

HON. JOSEPH A. KUHN. – Judge Kuhn has long filled a position of such prominence in Washington that the details of his life will be of public interest. His career illustrates once more the fact that the brawn and brain of the East needs but to touch the earth to spring up in double vigor at the West. He is the fourth in a family of six sons, resident in Pennsylvania; and the year of his birth was 1841. His mother belonged to an old American family of large reputation; and his father enjoyed the rank of colonel, and was for two terms judge of his county. At the age of eighteen our subject left home for Calvert College, Maryland, but before finishing his course determined to begin life for himself at the West. He reached Omaha, Nebraska, in June, 1860, and accepted the arduous and adventurous business of freighting, or driving “prairie schooners” to various points in the Rocky Mountains, – Denver, Salt Lake, Bannack and Virginia City. He followed this occupation six years with the exception of a time spent in the army during the Rebellion. He rose in his frontier avocation, becoming master of the Red Line train to Salt Lake; but, finally taking a mule-train, he came through to Stockton, California, and in the autumn of 1866 sailed up to the Sound. He stopped off...

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Biography of Fred S. Watt

Fred S. Watt, cashier of the Lovewell State Bank, is a man of exceptlonal ability and widely known in Jewell County, and besides his banking duties is also pastor of the United Brethren Church at Lovewell. Mr. Watt was born in Webster County, Nebraska, July 30, 1879. He is of English ancestry but the family located in Pennsylvania in colonial times. His grandfather, John Watt, was born in Indiana in 1810 and in 1871 became one of the piommer settlers in Webster County, Nebraska, where he homesteaded 160 acres near Guide Rock. He was a practical farmer, and spent his last years in comfortable retirement at Gulde Rock, where he died in 1891. He married Elizabeth Adams, who was born in Ohio in 1815 and died at Guide Rock, Nebraska, in 1899. Five of their children are still living: James, a retired farmer at Guide Rock; Fred, who follows the trade of butcher at Guide Rock; L. L., a retired hotel man at Guide Rock; Frank Watt; and Addle, who is living at Guide Rock, widow of Charles Ely, who was a farmer. Frank Watt, father of Fred S., was born in Vermilion County, Illinois, in 1857, and was fourteen years of age when his parents removed to the frontier of Nebraska. He grew up there, and on reaching his majority homesteaded eighty acres of land and had developed...

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Biography of Almon S. Senter

An eventful career was that of Colonel Almon S. Senter, who for some years figured conspicuously in connection with the mercantile and official interests of Lincoln County. At the time of his death, March 6, 1899, he was serving as district-court clerk and ex-officio auditor and recorder of Lincoln County, and he was also an enterprising and prominent merchant of Shoshone. A native of the old Granite state, he was born February 18, 1845, and is a representative of one of the old and honored families of New Hampshire, of English descent. His ancestors were early settlers of Londonderry, that state, and one of his great-granduncles served in the Colonial army during the Revolutionary war. The grandfather and father of our subject, both of whom bore the name of Thomas Senter, were natives of New Hampshire, the latter born in Petersboro. He wedded Miss Mary C. Giddings, a native of Temple, New Hampshire, and also a descendant of one of the prominent colonial families. Mr. Senter was an industrious farmer, who followed agricultural pursuits throughout his entire life. Both he and his wife were Methodists in religious belief, and the father lived to be sixty-four years of age, while the mother departed this life in her forty-seventh year, leaving a family of eleven children, the eldest but seventeen years of age, the youngest only three months old. Colonel Senter...

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Biography of Hon. James G. Watts

Among the practitioners of the bar of Silver City, Idaho, is James G. Watts, who is also a distinguished member of the state senate. Pennsylvania is the state of his nativity, his birth having occurred in the town of Wellsboro, July 23, 1858. His father, Daniel Watts, was a native of England, and on crossing the Atlantic to America took up his residence in New York, whence he afterward removed to the Keystone state. There he was married to Miss Harriet Goodrich, a native of Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and a representative of an old Puritan family. During the civil war the father entered the service of his country as a member of the Union army, and participated in the celebrated march to the sea. He died in a New York hospital of disease contracted in the service, leaving a widow and five children. The mother of these children died in 1890, when she had attained the age of sixty years. James G. Watts acquired his literary education in the Mansfield (Ohio) Normal School, where he was graduated in the class of 1880. For a number of years he successfully engaged in teaching school, and then began preparation for the legal profession as a student in the law office of Hon. T. W. McNealy, of Pittsburg, Illinois. Later he attended the Union College of Law, of Chicago, and was admitted...

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Biography of William M. Brown, M. D.

The medical fraternity is ably represented by Dr. William M. Brown, who is the leading physician of Cuprum, whither he removed in June of the present year, 1899, from Salubria, where he had continuously and successfully engaged in practice from June 1892. He was born in Preble County, Ohio, on the 18th of November, 1860. His ancestors were early settlers of South Carolina, and his grandfather, James Brown, was born in Due West, that state. James Scott Brown, the Doctor’s father, was a native of Preble County, Ohio, and having arrived at man’s estate he married Miss Julia Robertson, of Brighton, Iowa, who was born at Spring Hill, Indiana. He spent his entire life, however, near the old homestead where his birth occurred, and was an industrious, prosperous and honorable farmer. He and his wife were valued members of the United Presbyterian Church and exemplified in their daily lives their religious belief. Dr. Brown, the eldest in their family of nine children, eight of whom are yet living, was liberally educated and thus fitted for the responsible duties of life. Having attended the public schools of the Buckeye state, he further continued his studies in the university at Oxford, Ohio, and in Mommouth College, at Monmouth, Illinois. He was graduated in the Miami Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio, in the class of 1888, having therein completed a course in...

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Biography of Charles R. Kelsey

Among the more recent accessions to the town of Mountain Home is Charles R. Kelsey, a gentleman of large business experience, who, as a wholesale dealer in groceries and hardware and general merchandise, has already proved himself a potent factor in the business circles of his adopted county. Mr. Kelsey is a native of New York State, born in Delaware County, at Cannonsville. November 2, 1837, and in his veins flows the blood of French and German ancestors, who were among the early settlers of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His father, Michael B. Kelsey, was born in that city and counted among his relatives the distinguished family of Buchanans which furnished to the nation one of its presidents. Michael B. Kelsey was a prominent and successful farmer and stock dealer. He married Miss Phebe Galusha, who was also a representative of a distinguished eastern family. Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist church, and in county affairs he was active and influential, holding a number of official positions, including those of county commissioner and county sheriff. His wife died at the age of forty-five years and his death occurred when he had reached the advanced age of seventy-four. Their three children are all living at this writing. Charles R. Kelsey acquired his education in Poughkeepsie, New York. At an early age he was taught to depend upon his...

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Biography of Louis Elg

The man who first used gas for illumination at Idaho Falls, who put in the first telephone and who set up the first soda fountain in the town, is Louis Elg, druggist. Front and Maine streets. In other respects Mr. Elg has been a pioneer as well. His life has been a busy and eventful one and its important details are well worth the writing and the reading. He was born in Sweden, June 8, 1853, and is descended from a long line of Swedish ancestors. His father, also named Louis Elg, was an ironworker and was frozen to death, at the age of forty-eight, in 1867. His son Louis was then fourteen years old, and on him devolved much of the task of providing for the widow and her seven other children. He worked in a nail factory and in due course of time learned the blacksmith’s trade. In 1874, when he was twenty-one years old, he came to America. His mother is still living in her native land, being eighty years old. When Mr. Elg came to the United States he found himself seriously handicapped in his efforts to get on by reason of his total ignorance of the prevailing language of the country, but that was only one of the difficulties which he overcame as time passed. He stopped for a while in Chicago, and then...

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