Location: Norwich Connecticut

Pequot Tribe

Pequot Indians (contr. of Paquatauog, ‘destroyers.’- Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe of Connecticut. Before their conquest by the English in 1637 they were the most dreaded of the southern New England tribes. They were originally but one people with the Mohegan, and it is possible that the term Pequot was unknown until applied by the eastern coast Indians to this body of Mohegan invaders, who came down from the interior shortly before the arrival of the English. The division into two distinct tribes seems to have been accomplished by the secession of Uncas, who, in consequence of a dispute with Sassacus, afterward known as the great chief of the Pequot, withdrew into the interior with a small body of followers. This body retained the name of Mohegan, and through the diplomatic management of Uncas acquired such prominence that on the close of the Pequot War their claim to the greater part of the territory formerly subject to Sassacus was recognized by the colonial government. The real territory of the Pequot was a narrow strip of coast in New London County, extending from Niantic River to the Rhode Island boundary, comprising the present towns of New London, Groton, and Stonington. They also extended a few miles into Rhode Island to Wecapaug River until driven out by the Narraganset about 1635. This country had been previously in possession of the Niantic, whom...

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Biographical Sketch of Ezra Durand

Ezra Durand was born in Seneca Falls, New York, on March 8, 1833, and is the youngest of a family of thirteen sons and daughters of David and Betsey (Crowell), Durand. His father was a farmer and his early boyhood was passed on a farm. His opportunities for gaining an education were limited to a few winters at the district school. At an early age he left home and went to Worcester, Massachusetts, where he obtained employment in a musical instrument factory. This was followed by similar work in a factory at Norwich, Connecticut. He seemed to have a natural taste for the business, making rapid progress in a thorough knowledge of every branch. At the end of a few years he secured a situation with a Boston firm and traveled all through the New England States, tuning pianos and doing such other work in connection with musical instruments as the nature of their business required. In later years he was traveling salesman for the well known organ manufactory of Estey & Co., of Battleboro, Vermont. In 1881, Mr. Durand came to the Pacific Coast, and for a few months was located in San Francisco, California, but in. 1882, came to Portland. He soon after embarked in the piano and organ business and from the very start his venture proved to be highly successful. In 1883, he incorporated the...

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Biographical Sketch of L. E. Baldwin

John Baldwin, one of the first thirty-five settlers of Norwich in 1659, Was the ancestor of that branch of the family to which the subject of this notice belongs. John Baldwin, 2nd, grandson of. John, settled in New Concord, then a part of Norwich, but incorporated into the town of Bozrah in 1775, his son Eliphalet succeeding him in the occupancy of the homestead where the father of the subject of this notice was born in 1787. Upon attaining his majority, having qualified himself for his business, Eliphalet, Jr., removed to Norwich, and was extensively engaged in the manufacture of carriages up to the time of his death, November, 1819. The subject of this sketch was born in Norwich April 13th, 1810, attended the common schools from four to ten years of age, from ten to sixteen attending the common county district schools from three to four months each year. His father’s death occurring when the lad was nine years old, and his mother’s four years later, threw him upon his own resources. At the age of sixteen years he commenced to learn the trade of carpenter and joiner in all its branches. After serving ¬†an apprenticeship of five years, in May, 1831, he commenced business in Willimantic as a contractor and builder, for more than forty years being more .or less extensively engaged in building contracts, embracing large...

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