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Location: Norwich Connecticut

Ancestors of the Rufus W. Bassett Family of Fall River, Massachusetts

The family bearing this name in Fall River, to which belonged the late Hon. Rufus W. Bassett, long prominent in business and public affairs, for years a member of the board of police and much of the time its chairman, is a branch of the earlier Taunton family, it of the still earlier Rochester branch of the distinguished Bassetts of the Cape Cod towns of the Old Colony.

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Descendants of Isaac Benjamin of New Bedford, MA

The New Bedford Benjamin family here considered – some of the descendants of Isaac Benjamin, one of whose sons, the late Isaac W. Benjamin, was for years officially identified with the New Bedford Cordage Company and a public servant of the city of New Bedford of rare fidelity and usefulness – is a branch of the Livermore, Maine, family of the name and it of the still earlier family of Watertown, Mass., where arrived John Benjamin Sept. 16, 1632, in the ship “Lion.”

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Descendants of David E. Harding of Mansfield, MA

DAVID E. HARDING, deceased, who for more than a half century was a leading business man and manufacturer of Mansfield, Mass., was born there May 6, 1826. He was a descendant of an old Cape Ann family, the founder of the family in America being Edward Haraden, who came from Ipswich, England, to Gloucester. The name is found variously spelled, appearing as Haraden, Hardon and Harding, etc.

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Biography of Zebina Coit

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The death of Zebina Coit at Norwich, September 28, 1886, aged eighty-one years, removed another of the ancient landmarks of the town. Mr. Coit was a son of Captain Samuel Coit, who emigrated to Norwich from the town of the same name in Connecticut over one hundred years ago, and who married Mary Burton, sister of Pierce Burton, Esq., and Henry Burton, at Norwich in 1788. The ancient seat of the Coit family, a family historic in the annals of Connecticut, was in and around New London. Captain Coit, at that time a youth of nineteen, was present as a soldier at the burning of that town by the British under the traitor Benedict Arnold, and the bloody massacre of the garrison of Fort Griswold on Groton Heights, on the opposite bank of the river, at the same time. He died at Norwich in 1851 in his eighty-ninth year. Zebina Coit, born in 1805, lived all his days on the paternal homestead, situated on the height of land in the northwest part of the town near the town lines of Strafford and Sharon. Here Captain Coit kept for many years a well known hostelry, in the old times of stage coaches and travel over the turnpike road laid through town from Chelsea court house, and thence...

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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc,...

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Genealogy of Nicholas Baker of Scituate Massachusetts

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now K155 NICHOLAS BAKER: b. in England, 1610; d. in Scituate, Mass., 1678; St. John’s College, Cambridge, Eng., 1632; M.A. 1635; ordained as a minister in Scituate, and served the Puritan Church there until death; may have married his first wife in Eng.; m. (2), 1663. Samuel: 1628-1714; m. Fear Robinson; m. (2), Abigail (Lathrop) Huntington; lived in Hull, Barnstable, Norwich, Conn., Windham and Windsor, Conn. John: 1672-1763; m. Anna Annable; purchased lands in Windham County, Conn., 1643. Samuel: 1706-1791; m. Prudence Jenkins. Samuel: 1740-1812; m. Lydia Smith; m. (2), Chloe Silsby; m. (3), Sarah Farnham; established a separatist church called the “Brunswick Church”. Erastus: b. 1764. Ephraim: b. 1766; m. Phebe Edgerton Abbott; m. (2), Mary Kelsey; moved from Windham Co., to Salisbury, and then to Catskill, N. Y. Henry: moved to North Carolina before the Civil War. Charles: 1790-1853; m. Eleanor Abeel; a capt. in the War of 1812; in 1838, located in Columbus Twp., St. Clair Co., Mich. Moses Cantine: 1823-1894; m. Clarisa Thurston, moved to Oceana Co., Mich. Ch.:  Ashley Cantine: b. 1849; m. Beatrice Woodward.  Henry Woodward (b. 1887; m. Elsie Phipps), Floyd Miller (b. 1897). Frank E.: b. 1851; m. Emma Hall; d. 1907; had Clyde Harvey (b. 1882). Garrett A.: m.; in 1883 lived near Marshville, Mich. Ch.: Everett; Albert; William; Moses...

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Biography of Eliphaz Perkins

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Eliphaz Perkins, son of John Perkins, a leading citizen of Norwich, Connecticut, was born at that place, August 25, 1753. Deprived of his father at an early age, he was nevertheless enabled, through the exertions of his mother, to obtain a liberal education. Soon after leaving college, Mr. Perkins married Lydia Fitch, daughter of Dr. Jabez Fitch, of Canterbury, Connecticut, and engaged for a time in the mercantile business in that town. Subsequently he engaged in the same business in New Haven; having, however, an inclination to professional pursuits, he finally entered on the study of medicine with his father-in-law, and this was his vocation during the rest of his life. The times being hard, and his family increasing, Dr. Perkins decided to remove to a new country, and, in the spring of 1789, leaving his family in Connecticut, he started for Marietta. On his arrival here he found a number of persons from Clarksburg, Virginia, engaged in laying out a road between that place and Marietta. At their urgent solicitation he returned with them to Clarksburg, where he practiced medicine for nearly two years. The Indian war began about this time, and Dr. Perkins witnessed some terrible scenes of border warfare. In one instance the savages killed and scalped a family near where the Doctor...

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Biographical Sketch of David Pollard

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now David Pollard came in from Norwich, Conn., in 1790, and settled on the east side of the river, one mile below Afton, on the place now occupied by William Landers. He made a small clearing and built a log cabin and then sent for his family, consisting of his wife Polly, and six children. He died here December 30, 1830, aged 85, and his wife June 9, 1821, aged 69. His children were Polly, who married Richard Church, Lucy, who married William Olden, Cynthia, who married Heman Kelsey, Thomas, who moved to Seneca Falls some fifty years ago and died there, David, who married Polly Landers and lived and died on the homestead, Joseph, who married Polly Pool, and settled about a mile west of Afton, on the north end of the farm now owned by his son Luman C. Pollard, and after becoming too feeble to work it sold it to his son Jeremiah, (who is now living in California, to which State he removed in 1849,) and removed to the village, on the east side of the river, where he died March 13, 1859. Only two grandchildren are living in the county, Luman C. and Lysander Pollard, both in...

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Biographical Sketch of James D. Sullivan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now James D. Sullivan is proprietor of the Art Store at 122-124 West Eighth Street and 728-730 Jackson Street in Topeka. During his residence in Topeka he has developed a large business, and this is due to his thorough training in the profession and his own sense of artistic values which have enabled him to render a valuable service to his large patronage. James D. Sullivan was born in Norwich, Connecticut, January 11, 1861, a son of James and Mary (Bridgeman) Sullivan. He received a public school education, and also took a business course in a business college at Chicago. His best training for his profession came at Chicago, where he was long in the employ of the W. Scott Thurber Art Gallery as a foreman, these galleries having a wide reputation over the Central West not only as dealers in some of the most notable art works of the world, but also as creative artists and decorators. He spent about nineteen years in the Thurber galleries and for three years was with the firm of Bowen & Lee in the same line. In November, 1897, Mr. Sullivan came to Topeka and has directed his business as an art dealer and restorer of painting, and has always made artistic framing a specialty. One painting which Mr. Sullivan...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry Eldridge Bourne

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Bourne, Henry Eldridge; college professor; born, E. Hamburg, N. Y., April 13, 1862; son of James R. and Isabella G. Staples Bourne; A. B., Yale University, 1883, B. D. 1887 (Hooker fellow, 1887-1888); (L. H. D., Marietta College, Ohio, 1910); married; associate editor The Congregationalist, Boston, 1888-1889; teacher history and psychology, Norwich (Conn.), Free Academy, 1889-1892; prof. history, since 1892; registrar, 1893-1901; College for Women, Western Reserve University. Author: The Teaching of History and Civics, 1902; Medieval and Modern History, 1905. Editor: Lecky’s French Revolution, 1904. Contributor to...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Henry Geer

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Geer, Thomas Henry; general insurance; born, Ledyard, Conn., Sept. 3, 1840; son of Nathaniela Bellows and Julia Davis Geer; educated, common schools, Ledyard, Conn.; 1854, Irving Institute, Tarrytown, N. Y.; 1857, State Normal School, Westfield, Mass.; graduate, 1861-1862, Norwich Academy, Norwich, Conn.; married, Poquetanuck, Conn., June 30, 1868, Fanny Halsey Brewster; one daughter, Mary Brewster Geer; Republican in polities; 1859, teacher Grammar School, West Gloucester, Mass.; 1860, principal of High School, Rockport, Mass., 1862-1865, teacher Burlington College, Burlington, N. J., 1866 to date, general insurance business, Cleveland; pres. The Thomas H. Geer Co.; sec’y The Triton Steamship Co.; sec ‘y and pres. Cleveland Life Underwriter’s Ass’n; sec’y Life Underwriter’s Ass’n of Ohio; treas., vice pres. and pres. Cleveland Board of Underwriters; Pres. National Ass’n of Local Fire Insurance Agents; director The Cleveland Humane Society; vestryman Trinity Cathedral; member Athletic...

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Biographical Sketch of John Rowlee Fausey

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JOHN ROWLEE FAUSEY – To the general advancement of the interests of the public schools of Massachusetts, and particularly of Springfield and West Springfield, Mr. Fausey has devoted the larger part of his career as a teacher and superintendent, and with results that are recorded as having enlarged the bounds and increased the value of the educational institutions in those communities where he has taught and held official position. John Rowlee Fausey, son of James Seldon and Caroline Helen (Blauvelt) Fausey, was born March 19, 1870, in Elmira, New York, where he attended the public school, and he afterwards graduated at Genessee Wesleyan Seminary at Lima, New York, in the class of 1893, In 1893-1895 and 1896-1897, he was a student at Syracuse University, where he later received his degree of Bachelor of Arts. Mr. Fausey at once entered upon his career as an educator, and during 1898-1899 he was both teacher and principal at Galeton, Pennsylvania; at Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1899-1902; and at Norwich, Connecticut, in 1902-1905. Mr. Fausey went to Springfield as principal of the Howard Street School of that city in 1906, and he continued in that position until 1912, when he went to West Springfield as superintendent, so continuing to 1918. From 1918 to 1923, he served as superintendent at Winchester, Massachusetts....

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Biographical Sketch of James T. Brown

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JAMES T. BROWN, manager of the Hotel Worthy, Springfield, Massachusetts, was born in Luzeme, New York, February 24, 1885. His father was William E. Brown, and his mother Jennie I. (Taylor) Brown. The father was engaged in the mill business at Norwich, and also conducted a tannery. The family removed from the New York village where the early years of Mr. Brown were passed, to Norwich, Connecticut, when he was twelve years old. There the boy attended the public schools. He completed his studies to become a hotel employe, and his chosen occupation he has followed steadily through life. After many successful ventures he became manager of the Hotel Worthy, Springfield, in 1922, and has continued in that capacity ever since. He is also manager and director of the Worthy Inn, at Manchester, Vermont, a place he has filled since 1919. In October, 1924, Mr. Brown became the lessee of the Hotel Draper, at Northampton, Massachusetts, adding that noted resort to his other properties. Mr. Brown is a member of the Oxford Country Club; and of the Masonic Club. His fraternal affiliations are with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Masonic fraternity, in which he has received the thirty-second degree, Scottish Rite. He is a member of Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of...

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Pequot Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Pequot Indians (contr. of Paquatauog, ‘destroyers.’- Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe of Connecticut. Before their conquest by the English in 1637 they were the most dreaded of the southern New England tribes. They were originally but one people with the Mohegan, and it is possible that the term Pequot was unknown until applied by the eastern coast Indians to this body of Mohegan invaders, who came down from the interior shortly before the arrival of the English. The division into two distinct tribes seems to have been accomplished by the secession of Uncas, who, in consequence of a dispute with Sassacus, afterward known as the great chief of the Pequot, withdrew into the interior with a small body of followers. This body retained the name of Mohegan, and through the diplomatic management of Uncas acquired such prominence that on the close of the Pequot War their claim to the greater part of the territory formerly subject to Sassacus was recognized by the colonial government. The real territory of the Pequot was a narrow strip of coast in New London County, extending from Niantic River to the Rhode Island boundary, comprising the present towns of New London, Groton, and Stonington. They also extended a few miles into Rhode Island to Wecapaug River until driven out by the Narraganset...

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