Location: Northampton Massachusetts

Biography of Albert Henry Warren Stimson

ALBERT HENRY WARREN STIMSON – After a rich experience in the business world, Albert Henry Warren Stimson, of Northampton Massachusetts, since 1909 has followed farming and become not only one of the prosperous farmers of the vicinity but a man active in community affairs and highly regarded by all his fellow citizens. He is the descendant of a very old New England family, which traces back to early Colonial days. (I) The surname Stimson is in its origin identical with Stephenson, Stevenson and Stimpson, and in its various forms is common in England and Scotland and of very ancient usage. The first members of the family of whom there is record in America are James and Naomi Stimson who werd to be found in Reading, Massachusetts, in 1638. (II) Dr. James Stimson, son of James and Naomi Stimson, was a resident of Reading. He married, in 1661, Mary Liffingwell, and they were the parents of twelve children. James Stimson was a physician. (III) Dr. James Stimson, son of Dr. James and Mary (Liffingwell) Stimson, and like his father a physician,, was born in 1669. There is proof that he moved from Lynn, Massachusetts, to Tolland County, Connecticut, prior to 1716, and on June 21, 1720, he received a grant of county land from the General Assembly. He was the first resident physician of that vicinity. He married (first) Sarah...

Read More

Biography of Frank Andrew Brandle

FRANK ANDREW BRANDLE – Northampton is favored in its pharmaceutical interests with Mr. Brandle’s long association in the drug store business here, both during the period while he was in others’ employ, and particularly since he established his own pharmacy in 1901, the thorough reliability and excellence of his methods receiving general acknowledgement. Mr. Brandle’s training and study have been continuous since he entered upon his chosen business career; and as a result his pharmacy is second to no other in this part of the State. He is the son of Jacob Brandle who was born in 1836, in Germany, and died December 2, 1879, in Northampton, son of George and Rosa Brandle. Coming to the United States in his boyhood, he was employed in New York City for a short time, later residing several years in Providence, Rhode Island. He learned the tailor’s trade at which he worked several years, and he engaged in business at Northampton, where he died at forty-three years of age. He was a member of the German Society of Harigari. Jacob Brandle married, in Providence, Rhode Island, Caroline Held, who was born in Chicago, Illinois, and died June 16, 1919, in Northampton, daughter of Joseph and Rose (Mack) Held. She married (second) Charles Sanderson. The children of Jacob and Caroline (Held) Brandle: Flora I.; Frank A., of whom further; Rose E., who married...

Read More

Biography of Horace Everett Boynton, D.C., Ph. C.

HORACE EVERETT BOYNTON, D. C., Ph. C. – In the younger group of professional men in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, Dr. Horace Everett Boynton is taking a leading position and his activities are reflecting credit not only upon himself but upon the school of healing of which he is a representative. A native of the State of Massachusetts, but for some years a resident of New Hampshire, Mr. Boynton is a member of a family long prominent in New England. He is a son of John Boynton, and a grandson of Joshua Boynton, the family tracing back through many generations of American ancestry to the Boynton family distinguished on the northwest coast of England. John Boynton, father of Horace E. Boynton, married Louise C. Ham, who died in the year 1923; she was a daughter of Reuben Ham, also a prominent citizen of Massachusetts. John and Louise C. (Ham) Boynton were the parents of six children: John Edward; Ernest Wheeler; Frank Agustus; Mable Louise; Horace Everett, of further mention; and Laura Grace. Horace Everett Boynton was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, December 27, 1886. Following his elementary studies, he attended high school at Plymouth, New Hampshire, and as a young man mastered telegraphy. Mr. Boynton’s first experience was in the employ of the White Mountain Telegraph & Telephone Company and he became one of their expert operators. Breaking health compelled him...

Read More

Biography of Reese James Richards

Mr. Richards’ long experience in the jewelry business has culminated in one of the most popular and well-equipped jewelry establishments at Northampton, and in this part of the State; and to bring about its gradual and substantial development he has added the results of investigation and training that have been lifelong. His interest in the broadening of civic affairs has always been a most active feature of his Northampton citizenship; and he has held office that has been productive of progressive results to the community. Mr. Richards is the son of William T. Richards, who who was born in England and died in Fairhaven, Vermont, in 1923, fifty-seven years of age. Coming to the United States about 1875, he went to Arizona, and on account of the then prevailing conditions of travel, his journey to that territory occupied three months. After engaging in gold mining there for seven years, he returned East and located at Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, where he gave his attention to coal mining, and as a contractor in mining he drove rock tunnels, and he was also a mining superintendent. Removing to Fairhaven, Vermont, in 1902, he was active in the farming line to the time of his death. He had served as a member of the Wilkes-Barre School Committee six years, and he was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows there. He married...

Read More

Biography of Henry Edgar Maynard

HENRY EDGAR MAYNARD – The Maynards of this country can point with pride to a name of great antiquity. The name Manard or Maynard, appears in the Rolls of Battle Abbey, as among the Normans who came to England with William the Conqueror. John Maynard was appointed Governor of Breast Castle, in Brittany, July 28, 1352, by Edward, Prince of Wales. Sir Henry Maynard, the sixth in descent from John Maynard, mentioned above, was sheriff of Essex County, and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth. His son William, was created “Lord of Wicklow” in Ireland, May 30, 1520, by King James I. Lord William was made Baron of the Realm in 1620, by King Charles I. Whether any of these were ancestors of the Maynards in America is not known, but it shows the Maynard family as one of great prominence and antiquity in England. John Maynard, immigrant ancestor of the Maynards in this country, was born in England about 1610. He was a farmer for most of his life, but had the trade of a malster. He was a proprietor first of Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 29, 1644. He removed to Sudbury, and was one of the proprietors of that town. He was a selectman there in 1646. The name was spelled in the records Maynard, Mynard, and Minor. He was one of the forty-seven petitioners who divided the Sudbury...

Read More

Biography of Arthur Berkmere Richards

ARTHUR BERKMERE RICHARDS, inheritor of a vast meat trade, and in later years a dairy farmer at Amherst, Massachusetts, was born in Cummington, Connecticut, May 23, 1864. The name he bears is one of the names of Welsh origin widely known and prominent in the United States, which originated in making a surname from the possessive form of the father’s name. It signifies Richard’s son. At least seventeen different coats-of-arms belong to the different branches of the family. A manor at Caernwyck, Marioneth County, Wales, was inherited by Sir Richard Richards, president of the House of Lords, and Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer. His ancestors possessed the estate in 1550. They claim the privilege of bearing the identical arms of Richard of East Bagborough, County Somerset. This was depicted on the tablet of the Hon. James Richards, of Hartford, who died in 1680, and may be seen in an ancient manuscript in the New England Historic Genealogical Society Library, halved with the arms of Governor Winthrop, whose daughter married a Richards in 1692. William Richards, immigrant ancestor of this branch of the family in America, appears to have crossed the ocean in company with his brother, John, and sister, Sarah, who married George Pidcocke. He was taxed at Plymouth in 1632-1633. He removed to Scituate, January 6, 1636-1637, and forfeited his land at Plymouth. It was...

Read More

Biography of Samuel Arthur Eyre

SAMUEL ARTHUR EYRE – In both his civics and his industrial relationships with Northampton, Mr. Eyre has fulfilled the anticipation’s of his constituency and of his colleagues; and in his devotion to city official duties and those of mill overseership, he has won the confidence and good will of all with whom he is associated. He is the son of Harry Eyre, who was born in England, January 3, 1862, and Inez (Clark) Eyre, who was born in Northampton, June 23, 1867. Harry Eyre came to Northampton in 1886, where, prominent in Republican party affairs, he has served as secretary of the Republican City Committee for twelve years, that committee having been honored with President Calvin Coolidge as an associate. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Eyre are the parents of: Harry George, born in 1891, died in infancy. Inez May, born in 1892, a clerk in the bureau of aeronautics of the United States Government, at Washington, District of Columbia. Samuel Arthur, of whom further. Elsie Clark, born in 1898, married Thomas T. Newby, resides in Washington, and they have Thomas Harry and Olivia Jane. Millicent Grace, born in 1903, married Granville Craven, of Northampton, and they are the parents of Betty Mae Craven. Doris Elizabeth, born in 1912, attends Northampton High School. Samuel Arthur Eyre was born February 22, 1895, at Northampton, where he attended the public schools When...

Read More

Biography of George Herbert Burnham

GEORGE HERBERT BURNHAM – Walter Le Veutre came to England at the time of the Conquest, in 1066, in the train of his cousin-german, Earl Warren, sonin-law of William the Conqueror. He was lord of the Saxon village of Burnham and others, and from Burnham, where he lived, he was known as De Bumham. He took his surname from this town. The name is often spelled Burnam, Bernam, and Barnham, as well as Burnham, and in the old Anglo-Saxon, Beornham, Byrnhom, and in other forms. In the old Norse the name is Bjorn, which in Anglo-Saxon is Beorn, and Burn (a bear), meaning, according to Ferguson, “chief, hero, man.” There were towns of this name in both Somersetshire and County Sussex before the year 900, and the family has been distinguished ever since. The ancient coat-of-arms is: Arms-Sable, a cross between four crescents argent. The Burnhams of both Old and New England trace their ancestry remotely to A. D. 1010, when their ancient patronymic was de Burnham, and it so continued until 1080, when the prefix de was dropped. And they are descended from Walter le Veutre. Such, in brief, is the origin of one of the ancient families of England, and one which in New England dates from the early Colonial period, from the year 1635, when three immigrant brothers-John, Thomas and Robert Burnham-came from England and sat...

Read More

Biography of Marion Knox Case

MARION KNOX CASE – The family name of Case is found as far back as the book of the Hundred Rolls in the thirteenth century. It is supposed to have been derived from the Latin word cass, meaning house or cottage. The Case family has a long record of good work and accomplishment both in England and America. Marion Knox Case has followed in the footsteps of his forefathers, and is a thorough-going business man, who has made a success of his undertakings. The founder of the Case family in America was John Case, who emigrated from England in 1635 and settled in Hartford, Connecticut. There were several generations following John Case in which the name William was prominent. The fifth of the name of William married Abigail Belle. Their son, Jonathan, was born in Rehoboth, Massachusetts, in 1773, and died in Bristol, Ontario County, New York, in 1855. It was hard traveling in those days and the country in that section was sparsely settled, and it was a difficult task for Jonathan Case to move his family into New York State, clear the land, build a house and make it habitable, in that, then, uninhabited region. The country grew up around him, though, and the incoming settlers selected Jonathan Case to be justice of the peace. He was a staunch member of the Baptist Church. His wife was...

Read More

Biography of Daniel Lynch

DANIEL LYNCH – Among Northampton’s most useful and practical citizens, Daniel Lynch, expert brick mason, contractor and builder, has performed a work of permanent value to the material interests of the city in the course of the quarter of a century that he has been engaged in business on his own account; and the city and its neighborhood have profited in the result of good workmanship. Honest dealing and sound common sense have invariably characterized his enterprises as a builder, as well as his sterling counsel in matters relating to civic economics and community betterment. Of his industrious and zealous race he was taught industry and zeal in all his undertakings. His grandfather, John Lynch, lived and died in Ireland; and his children were: Edward, of whom further; Timothy; Mary; Kate; Honora; Margaret; Jeremiah. Edward Lynch, son of John Lynch, was born in County Kerry, Ireland, and died in Northampton, September 1, 1911, aged about ninety years. A carpenter by trade, he came to the United States in 1890, and lived in Northampton to the time of his death. He married Bridget Herlihy, who was born in County Kerry, and died there in 1880, daughter of Daniel and Mary Herlihy. Their children were: Timothy, who died young; John, who also died in his early years; Daniel, of whom further; Mary, who married a Mr. Whelan; and Margaret, who married...

Read More

Biography of Robert Sheperd Kneeland

ROBERT SHEPHERD KNEELAND – Prominent in the business life of Springfield, Massachusetts, as a lawyer of attainments, who enjoys the good will of the community-at-large as well as of his compeers in his own profession, is Robert Shepherd Kneeland, engaged since 1911, in a general law practice under his own name. He is the son of Frederick N. and Adelaide Frances (Dyer) Kneeland, both of Massachusetts, the father a banker. Robert Shepherd Kneeland was born at Northampton, Massachusetts, April 26, 1883. He received his preliminary education in the public and high schools of Northampton, after which he entered Amherst College, graduated there in the class of 1905 with the degree of A. B., and three years later from the Harvard Law School with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. In 1908, immediately after graduation, he was admitted to the Massachusetts bar, and entered the office of judge William G. Bassett and Judge Edward L. Shaw, in Northampton. In 1911 he commenced his practice in Springfield, where he has continued ever since, gradually building up for himself a successful practice that testifies to the quality of his services. He is a member of the Beta Theta Pi and the Phi Beta Kappa fraternities, the Springfield Chamber of Commerce, the Hampden County Bar Association, and the Massachusetts Bar Association. Politically, Mr. Kneeland is a Republican, and his religious affiliations are with...

Read More

Biography of John William Kenney, D.D.S.

JOHN WILLIAM KENNEY, D. D. S. – The profession of dentistry has a thorough and capable exponent at Northampton in Dr. Kenney who with his present-day methods and valued experience is accounted one of the foremost men in his line in this part of the State, where he has been in successful practice since 1902. He has the highest regard of the public in their appreciation of his skill, as well as of dental offices and laboratory that are unrivaled in the excellence of their equipment. Four generations of this branch of the family have now resided in Massachusetts, his grandfather who came from Ireland, having lived both in Pittsfield and in Hinsdale, where he was a farmer to the time of his death. Dr. Kenney’s father, Patrick L. Kenney, who was born in Ireland, died in Pittsfield, in December, 1923, where he had located as a young man; he was employed at the Williamsburg Mills at the time of the disastrous flood in that township, and he was an overseer in the Pontusic Mills at Pittsfield for many years. He was a quiet and home-loving man. He married Elizabeth Hopper, who was born in Pittsfield, and now resides there at the age of seventy-six years, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Duffy) Hopper, Thomas Hopper having been a native of England. Patrick L. Kenney’s children were: Margaret, Catherine, who...

Read More

Biography of Stephen Jose Vanderlick

STEPHEN JOSE VANDERLICK – Of the younger group of Northampton attorneys, who through energetic effort and by abilities well proven in training and in natural gifts have won deserved popularity, Mr. Vanderlick has established his offices as a general practitioner, and entered upon his professional career under excellent auspices. He is a descendant of an industrious Polish ancestry, who for generations were natives of Lipno, in Russian Poland. There his great-grandfather, Michael Vanderlick, was born March 25, 1800, and died in March, 1860; his wife’s name was Kathirim, and their children were: Josephine; Joseph, of whom further; Henry; and Anthony. Joseph Vanderlick, Mr. Vanderlick’s grandfather, was born May 17, 1820, in Lipno, where he died January 5, 1888. He married Mary Malintac, who was born April 25, 1825, and died December 3 1895, and they were the parents of: Stanley, of whom further; Frank, and Maria. Stanley Vanderlick, Mr. Vanderlick’s father, was born August 23, 1850, in Lipno, and he followed farming throughout his life. Coming to the United States in 1898, he located at Hatfield for a time, later removing to Northampton, where he conducts a well-kept farm. He married, July 20, 1883. Antonia Skunicki, who was born September 3, 1860, in Lipno, daughter of Joseph and Josephia (Battacz) Skunicki, and their children were: 1. Anthony, who married Agnes Czerzewicz, and whose children are: Sophia, Joseph, Michael and...

Read More

Biography of Dr. John Hallam Roberts

DR. JOHN HALLAM ROBERTS – A man of fine education and scientific in the practice of his profession, that of a veterinarian, Dr. Roberts is one of the highly esteemed residents of Northampton, Massachusetts. His forebears are from English stock. Edward Roberts, the great-grandfather of Dr. Roberts, was born in England. He came to the province of Quebec, Canada, in 1816, and his wife’s name was Hallam. His son, Samuel Roberts, was born in England in 1800, and died in Canada in the province of Quebec, in 1898, aged ninety-eight years. He was the eldest child of his parents, and came to Canada with them when sixteen years of age. He followed farming in Canada. He married Lydia Spear, born in Canada, died in 1894. Their children were: Edward, of whom further; Turner and Samuel. Edward Roberts, born in Granby, Quebec, in 1840, died 1908, aged sixty-eight years, was a farmer, owning a place of some two hundred acres on Granby Hill. One of his features of this life was dairying. He was a liberal in politics, and was a member of the Episcopal Church. He married Ann Roberts, born in the province of Quebec, daughter of Lother Roberts. She died in 1923. Their children were: William, who died in 1914, leaving a daughter, Isabella. John H. Dr. John Hallam Roberts was born in West Stafford, province of Quebec,...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of John Sheldon

John, son of Isaac (2) Sheldon, was born December 5. 1658. He settled in Northampton, Massachusetts. He removed to Deerfield and conducted a public house. He was one of the first board of selectmen, ensign of the first military company and captain in 1707. and deacon of the church. He built the old Hoyt house, the door of which, cut by tomahawks and bullets, is preserved in Memorial Hall. In the winter of 1705 he was sent by Governor Dudley on a difficult and dangerous mission to Canada to redeem the captives and returned the following spring with five, two of whom were Hannah, wife of his son, and Esther Williams, daughter of the Deerfield minister. The next winter he was sent again and returned with forty-four redeemed captives of the French and Indians, sailing for home. May 30, 1706, and again with fifty-seven on the brigantine “Hope.” Mr. Williams said of him : “He was a good man and a true servant of the church in Deerfield, who twice took his tedious journey in the winter from New England to Canada on these occasions.” He made a third trip in 1707-08, and returned with seven captives, making a total of one hundred and thirteen that he brought back to their old homes, after the horrors and hardships of captivity. He removed to Hartford. He died in 1734. He...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest