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Location: Niagara County NY

Antique Rock Citadel of Kienuka, in Lewiston, Niagara County, NY

In the preceding sketches, evidences have been presented of the readiness and good judgment of the aboriginal fort builders of western New York, 1It is not without something bordering on anachronism, that this portion of the continent is called New York, in reference to transactions not only before the bestowal of the title, in 1664, but long before the European race set foot on the continent. Still more inappropriate, however, was the term of New Netherland, i. e. New Lowland, which it bore from 1609 to 1664, many parts of the State being characterized by lofty mountains, and all...

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Tonawanda Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Tonawanda Reservation, in the counties of Erie, Genesee, and Niagara, New York, as originally surveyed in 1799, and as reserved by the treaty at Big Tree, covered 71 square miles. Coincident with a treaty between the United States and this band of Seneca Indians, March 31, 1859, promulgated November 5, 1859, the claim of the Ogden Land Company was extinguished, and the present reservation limits embrace 7,549.73 acres, lying partly in each of the counties of Erie, Genesee, and Niagara. One heavy dirt road, almost impassable in the spring or an ordinarily wet season, runs out from the center of Akron, sending a fork into the reservation at a distance of more than 3 miles. A second road, running northeasterly from Akron, enters the reservation at a distance of about 25 miles, at the point where the West Shore railroad enters the reservation, as indicated on the map. Up to this point the road is very well maintained. Half a mile from this point lies a triangular piece of land, which is occupied by the Indian Baptist Church, the Indian Methodist Church, an old council house, schoolhouse No. 2, and the new house of Eliza, with of David Moses, a chief of the Wolf tribe, and a prominent member of the christian party. From this central triangle 3 roads take their departure. The first runs northwest, leaving the...

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Tuscarora Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Tuscarora Reservation, in Niagara County, New York, is formed from 3 adjoining tracts successively acquired, as indicated on the map. Their early antecedents as kinsmen of the Iroquois, their wanderings westward to the Mississippi, and their final lodgment at the head waters of the rivers Neuse and Tar, in North Carolina, are too much enveloped in tradition to be formulated as history, but courageous, self supporting, and-independent, after long residence upon lands owned by them in that colony, they first came into collision with white people, then with other tribes of that section, until finally, overpowered by numbers,...

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Reservations of the Six Nations in New York and Pennsylvania, 1723-1890

The accompanying map was prepared in 1771 under the direction of William Tryon, captain general and governor in chief of the province of New York, and is as nearly suggestive of the then recognized boundary of the Six Nations as any that has had official sanction. In 1851 Lewis H. Morgan, assisted by Ely S. Parker, a Seneca chief; and afterward an efficient staff Officer of General Grant, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, prepared a map for a volume entitled League of the Iroquois, which aimed to define the villages, trails, and boundaries of the Five Nations as...

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Biography of Richard S. Rutherford

As a man among men, possessed of integrity, ability and perseverance; as a soldier, whose steady and constant service in the struggle for the punishment of treason and the wiping out of the insult to the stars and stripes was valiant and brave; as a business operator, whose wisdom and enterprise have been well manifested: the subject of this sketch stands, and it is fitting that a representation of him be granted space in this volume of Malheur’s history. Richard S. was born in Armagh county, near Bellfast, Ireland, on February 22, 1840, being the son of Thomas and Amelia (Parks) Rutherford, who emigrated to this country when this son was eighteen months old. They settled in Quebec, Canada, whence in 1848 they came to Niagara county, New York. In 1852 they removed to Tuscola county, Michigan, and few years later our subject started in life for himself, his first move was to Scott county, Missouri, where he lived until the breaking out of the Civil War. At that particular time he was in charge of a plantation. On the tenth day of August, 186l, he offered his services to fight the battles of the nation, enlisting in Company H, Eighth Missouri Volunteer Infantry, being in the Fifteenth Army Corps under General Logan and in Sherman’s Division. He went in as a private and helped with good will to...

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Biography of Andrew, Scott Rev.

Rev. Andrew Scott. The qualities of real manhood and the power of leadership were never in greater demand in church work than today. The clergy have always been men of education and of fine moral standing, and with these qualities the successful pastor must now combine the spiritual enthusiasm and some of the same enterprise and energy which are such vital assets in the business world. A better type of this modern minister Champaign County does not have than in the case of Rev. Mr. Scott, pastor of the Christian Church at Fisher. Mr. Scott is a man of letters, has had the benefit of extensive travel, is a fluent and logical speaker, and in the course of his active career has shown unusual capacity as an organizer, administrator and a real church builder. Some of these qualities he undoubtedly inherited from the land of his birth. He is a Scotchman by nativity, and was born at Melrose in Roxborough. His birth occurred February 13, 1857. He was the third in a family of six children, three sons and three daughters. All these children are living and all in Canada except Mr. Scott. His parents were Adam and Agnes (Gilroy) Scott. His father, who was born in the same locality as the son, was a Scotch teacher, an occupation also followed by the grandfather of Rev. Mr. Scott. In...

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Biographical Sketch of John H. Shields

JOHN H. SHIELDS. – The reader of this sketch can find elsewhere within these pages an excellent view of the mill and lumber yard of the gentleman named above, and upon glancing at its proportions will not dispute the assertion that Mr. Shields stands well to the fore among the more prominent of the lumber merchants of the Pacific Northwest. Being attracted with the location of Sprague, Washington Territory, he established himself there in 1882. His business grew to such proportions that in 1885 he found it necessary to add to his equipment a large planing-mill. His enterprise occupies one block on the corner of G and First streets and the Railroad avenue. Some idea of his business can be gleaned from the fact that he keeps in stock about a million feet of dry and Oregon dressed lumber. Mr. Shields was born in Lockport, New York, April 6, 1855, and came to the Pacific coast in 1873. He is one of the most active business men of the Columbia...

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Tuscarora Indians

Tuscarora Tribe, Tuscarora Confederacy: From their own name Skǎ-ru’-rěn, signifying according to Hewitt (in Hodge, 1910), “hemp gatherers,” and applied on account of the great use they made of Apocynum cannabinum. Also called: Ă-ko-t’ǎs’-kǎ-to’-rěn Mohawk name. Ani’-Skǎlǎ’lǐ, Cherokee name. Ă-t’ǎs-kǎ-lo’-lěn, Oneida name. Tewohomomy (or Keew-ahomomy), Saponi name. Tuscarora Connections. The Tuscarora belonged to the Iroquoian linguistic family. Tuscarora Location. On the Roanoke, Tar, Pamlico, and Neuse Rivers. (See also Pennsylvania and New York.) Tuscarora Subdivisions. The Tuscarora should be considered a confederacy with three tribes or a tribe with three subtribes as follows: Kǎ’tě’nu’ā’kā’, “People of the submerged pine tree”; Akawǎntca’kā’, meaning doubtful; and Skarū’rěn, “hemp gatherers,” i. e., the Tuscarora proper. Tuscarora Villages The following were in North Carolina, a more precise location not being possible except in the cases specified: Annaooka. Chunaneets. Cohunche. Conauhcare. Contahnah, near the mouth of Neuse River. Cotechney, on the opposite side of Neuse River from Fort Barnwell, about the mouth of Contentnea Creek. Coram. Corutra. Harooka. Harutawaqui. Kenta. Kentanuska. Naurheghne. Neoheroka, in Greene County. Nonawharitse. Nursoorooka. Oonossoora. Tasqui, a day’s journey from Cotechney on the way to Nottaway village. Tonarooka, on a branch of Neuse River between “Fort Narhantes” and Cotechney. Torhunte, on a northern affluent of Neuse River. Tosneoc. Ucouhnerunt, on Pamlico River, probably in the vicinity of Greenville, in Pitt County. Unanauhan. Later settlements in New York were these: Canasaraga,...

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Biography of William Chester

The substantial rewards that come to the able and upright man as the result of well-doing, small as they may be in comparison with the fortunes and apparent honors won by questionable methods, bring With them a sense of satisfaction to which the sharp financier and the corrupt politician live and die as strangers. A man who wisely and honestly adjudicated the small misunderstandings of his fellow citizens for sixteen years, and who has the respect of all those for or against whom he has decided, as has Justice Chester, of Soda Springs, Idaho, has a greater reward than the perjured judge who ends his days in a bitter struggle to enjoy thousands obtained by oppression, injustice and a systematic affront to the law he has falsely sworn to uphold. William Chester, who is a member of the board of county commissioners, has been for sixteen years justice of the peace at Soda Springs, and is well and favorably known throughout eastern Idaho. He is a native of Lincolnshire, England, and was born May 3, 1843. His father, Thomas Chester, died when William was only a year old, and the baby was taken into the home of his grandfather, John Chester. He was educated in a plain, practical way, worked on the farm and learned the machinist’s trade. He came to America in 1873, with the expectation of having...

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Biographical Sketch of Albert Z. Howe

Howe, Albert Z.; contract mgr.; born, Lockport, N. Y., Dec. 9, 1872; son of Albert E. and Olga C. Zallee Howe; educated, public schools, Buffalo, N. Y., and private tutor in mathematics, geometry, and trigonometry; married, St. Louis, Mo., July 31, 1897, Mary Frances Hogue; first business experience, at seven-teen years of age, was in surveying and civil engineering in Buffalo, N. Y., followed by several years of the same class of work in railroad construction in the West and Southwest; later chief draftsman for the St. Louis Water Department, six years, when the sedentary occupation compelled a change; came to Cleveland as local mgr. for a large manufacturing concern, making advertising specialties; new engaged as contract mgr. for Ernst & Ernst, Certified Public Accountants, of Cleveland, New York City, Chicago, St. Louis and Cincinnati; member Chamber of...

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Biographical Sketch of John S. McCarrens

McCarrens, John S.; advertising; born, July 27, 1869; son of D. A. and Anna McGinley McCarrens; educated, public schools, Bradford, Pa., and Niagara University, Suspension Bridge, N. Y.; married, Toledo, O., June 24, 1896, Mary Sweeney; issue, two daughters and two sons; advertising mgr. and business collector; member Cleveland Advertising Club. Fond of Horseback...

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Biography of Charles E. Spooner

Charles E. Spooner. When he started upon his wage-earning career, at the age of fifteen years, Charles E. Spooner began at the bottom of the ladder in the capacity of bundle-boy in a department store. No favors were shown him, for he had no important friends or other favoring influences, but his fidelity, energy and ability won him recognition and promotion and he soon grew beyond the opportunities of his immediate environment, and from that time his advancement has been sure and steady. In 1888 he became connected with the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad, in a minor position and in the service of this line he has continued to the present, his position at this time being that of general auditor of the line, with headquarters at Parsons. Charles E. Spooner was born at Toronto, Ontario, Canada, March 11, 1858, and is a son of J. J. B. and Mary (Brewer) Spooner and a member of a family which originated in England and emigrated to New York during colonial days. His great-great-grandfather, William Spooner, fought as a soldier of the Continental line during the Revolutionary war, and his grandfather was “Col.” Alden Spooner, who passed his life at Brooklyn, New York, where he was publisher of the Long Island Star, a pioneer newspaper. J. J. B. Spooner, father of Charles E., was born in 1820, in Brooklyn, and...

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Blakeslee, Caroline D. – Obituary

Caroline D. Blakeslee, age 90 years, 4 months and 22 days, died in La Grande Monday last, and the funeral took place from the Episcopal church, Union, Wednesday afternoon, the 30th inst. Mrs. Blakeslee was 90 years old, having been born in Lewiston, New York, September 6, 1827. She was married to Chas. L. Blakeslee, May 12, 1850, and lived in Battle Creek, Mich., until 1865, when they crossed the plains to Union, where she lived until 1910. Since that time she has loved with her daughter, Mrs. Oliver. Mr. Blakeslee passed away June 1, 1905. She is survived by one son, Dr. L. K. Blakeslee, of Pendleton, and two daughters, Mrs. W. A. Hall, of Union, and Mrs. J. R. Oliver, of La Grande. Funeral services were held in Union at the Episcopal church of which she was a member since 1869, having helped to organize the church at Union. January 28, 1918 Contributed by: Larry...

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John Todd of Middleport NY

John Todd7, (David6, Abraham5, Abraham4, Jonah3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 5, 1806, in Peekskill, N. Y., died in 1884, married Eliza Agor. He moved to Middleport, N. Y., in the early thirties and bought land of the Holland Land Purchase from which he developed a good farm. Children: *1491. William Agor, b. March 28, 1833. *1492. Kelsey, b. Feb. 11,...

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Charles Henry Todd of Lockport NY

Charles Henry Todd8, (Justus B.7, William6, Yale5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 6, 1847, died Dec. 30, 1908, married July 22, 1868, Marilla Augusta Willard, of Lockport, N. Y., who was born Sept. 3, 1849. He, too, was a miller and lived in Lockport, N. Y. He was shipping clerk at the Thompson Milling Company for over 25 years. Also, he was an Elder, Trustee and Treasurer of Calvery Presbyterian Church, in Lockport, N. Y. Children: 2285. Helen Hortense, b. Sept. 24, 1869, d. March 21, 1896, m. June 14, 1894, Charles C. Campbell. 2286. Harry Willard, b. Aug. 16, 1878, d. Nov. 24, 1894. 2287. Roland Beilamy, b. Dec., 1890, d. July 24,...

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