Location: New Zealand

Biography of Samuel R. Parkinson

The name of this gentleman is so inseparably connected with the history of Franklin, its up-building and its progress along commercial, educational and church lines, that no history of the southeastern section of the state would be complete without the record of his useful career. He was one of the first to locate in Franklin and is numbered among its honored pioneers. A native of England, he was born in Barrowford, Lancastershire, April 12, 1831, a son of William and Charlotte (Rose) Parkinson, who were likewise natives of that country. He was only six months old when his father died, and two years later his mother married Edward Berry, a gentleman who was very fond of travel and who took his wife and stepson to many foreign ports, including the Cape of Good Hope, Africa, thence to Sydney, Australia, to New Zealand, to Valparaiso, in South America, and then back to England in the fall of 1846. They were shipwrecked in the Irish channel, were rescued in lifeboats, and were landed in Ireland at the time of the severe famine in that country. Mr. Parkinson’s stepfather expended nearly all his means in relieving the distress of his relatives in that country, and in the spring of 1848 he sailed with his family for New Orleans and thence to St. Louis, where our subject first heard the teachings of the...

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Lindsay, A. O. – Obituary

Alfred O. Lindsay, a resident of this county for the last 42 years, died Monday morning after a long illness. Funeral services held yesterday at the Snodgrass Chapel were conducted by Bishop Walter A. Lindsay of the First Ward L. D. S. church. Lindsay was born in New Zealand, July 18, 1886 and died at the age of 59 years. His survivors include five brothers, Walter, Lionel and John of La Grande. W. R. of Union and William of Tucson, Ariz.; four sisters, Mrs. Anna Nebeker, of La Grande, Mrs. Mildred Kofford, of Union, Mrs. Dorothy Ansell of Salt Lake City and Mrs. Winifred SLoop of Los Angeles. He was of member of the L. D. S. church. Eastern Oregon Review. December of 1945 or January 1946. Contributed by: Holly...

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Biography of James Boyd

James Boyd, a pioneer of Riverside, came to the colony in 1872, all his worldly goods consisting of a farm team of four horses, four cows, a lot of chickens and a few household effects, and eight dollars in cash; but he had a reserve capital of health, energy, intelligence, and a determination to succeed. He secured a squatter’s claim to seventy-three acres of Iand about two miles north of Riverside, and later an adjoining tract of eighty acres, upon which he camped with his family, his only shelter being a shanty 10 x 10, devoid of protection from the scorching sun and sand storms. Their modest cook stove was in the open air, and all the cooking was done in the morning to avoid the heat of the midday sun. Their mid day repast was served cold, but the necessary heating of tea, coffee and even edibles, was accomplished by setting the receptacles containing them upon the fireless stove in the open air; it was rare, indeed, that the fierce rays of the sun had not generated heat, that the storage qualities of that old stove rendered sufficient to bring water nearly to the boiling point. Mr. Boyd planted the seed of the eucalyptus, surrounding his home with those trees. Their growth seems marvelous; careful measurement taken in 1889 showed one of these trees, seventeen years old from...

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Biography of Dudley Farlin

DUDLEY FARLIN THE RECORDS of American biography furnish numerous instances of persons rising to high and honorable stations in life, commanding the respect and admiration of the public and performing many noble deeds in the interests of humanity. Among the causes which operate to produce this grand result are natural talents, constant industry, strict economy, high moral principle, with Che many golden opportunities afforded by our free institutions for the encouragement and development of material and intellectual greatness. Albany has its fair share of representative men of this class; and among the list we have one who is now a resident of this city – a public-spirited man, actively engaged in some of its large business concerns – Dudley Farlin, general freight agent of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company’s railroad, president of the Young Men’s association, etc. He was born on the 20th of December, 1835, in the town of Warrensburgh, Warren county, N. Y. In that rural healthful, romantic region he passed his earliest days under the watchful care of affectionate parents. He is a son of Myron B. Farlin and Harriet W. Farlin, both of whom have passed away. His father was for several years engaged in the lumber business at Warrensburgh, where he was highly respected by all who knew him for his many excellent traits of character. His grandfather, Dudley Farlin, one of the...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel George

SAMUEL GEORGE. – Mr. George was born in England in 1835, and in 1858 went to Australia, and in 1861 to New Zealand. From this antipodal region he came to British Columbia and mined for years at Caribou. In 1867 he brought his wanderings to a close by selecting a home in Umatilla county, Oregon, where he engaged in cattle raising on Butter creek in company with James Webb. They were partners for two years. Since their separation, he has conducted the business alone to the present time, keeping an average of about five hundred cattle on the range. Grass having become scant has necessitated his securing a considerable body of land. He now has seven hundred cattle and a hundred and thirty-five horses. This number he has maintained, notwithstanding material losses by hard winters, thieves and estraying. Mr. George is recognized as one of the substantial and hospitable citizens of this independent section, and is held in high esteem by the many who know...

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