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Location: New York County NY

Colonel Dodge Reaches Villages of Western Indians

Trailing through broad and verdant valleys, they went, their progress often arrested by hundreds of acres of plum trees bending to the ground with tempting fruit; crossing oak ridges where the ground was covered with loaded grapevines, through suffocating creek-bottom thickets, undergrowth of vines and briars, laboring up rocky hillsides and laboring down again, the horses picking their way through impeding rocks and boulders, until on the twenty-ninth of the month, two hundred miles from Fort Gibson, General Leavenworth and his staff reached Captain Dean’s camp, a mile or two from the Washita, where there were quartered two companies of the Third Infantry from Fort Towson. Reports of sickness among the men were alarming. They were dying daily, and failure of the expedition was threatened. General Leavenworth, who had intended to send the command on from the Washita in charge of Colonel Dodge, announced that he himself would proceed in charge to the Wichita country. It was not until the first day of July that the regiment came dragging into camp with forty-five men and three officers ill from exposure, the surgeon said, brought on by marching through the heat of the day. A contributing cause was the strange diet to which these untrained, undisciplined men gave themselves, and the sudden and intemperate indulgence of their appetite in abundant buffalo meat. On arrival at the Washita, seventy-five horses and...

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Mound Builders

The types of the human skulls taken from those ancient mounds said to have been erected by a prehistoric race, and now called “Mound Builders” a race claimed to be far superior to our Indians are characteristic, not only of the ancient Mexicans, Peruvians and other ancient tribes of South America, but also of the ancient Natchez, Muskogee’s, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Cherokees, Seminoles, Yamases and others of the North American continent. And it is a conceded fact that all Indians ever found in North and South America possess many common features. I have seen the native Indians of Mexico, Arizona...

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Prominent White Men among the Chickasaws

At an early day a few white men of culture and of good morals, fascinated with the wild and romantic freedom and simplicity of the Chickasaw life, cast their lot among that brave and patriotic nation of people. I read an article published in Mississippi a few years ago, which stated that a man by the name of McIntosh, commissioned by British authorities to visit the Chickasaw Nation and endeavor to keep up its ancient hostility to the French, was so delighted with the customs and manners of that brave, free and hospitable people that, after the accomplishment of his mission,...

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Biography of Charles F. M. Stark

Charles F. M. Stark, a wellknown resident of Dunbarton, Merrimack County, was born in this town, February 18, 1848, son of John and Caroline J. (Morris) Stark. He is a great-great-grandson of General John Stark, the famous victor of Bennington. John Stark, the father, was a lawyer, who practised his profession in Galena, Ill., and in New York City. He died in Washington, D.C., at the age of forty-two years. His wife, Caroline, was the youngest daughter of Thomas Morris, and a grand-daughter of Robert Morris, signer of the Declaration of Independence and first Secretary of State of the United States. Charles F. M. Stark was a student at St. Paul’s School in Concord. After leaving school, he resided for a number of years in New York City, and for a time was interested in insurance in New York and Boston. He finally returned to the family homestead in Dunbarton, where he has since resided, it having become his property through inheritance. The house was built by his great-grandfather, Major Caleb Stark, a son of General John Stark, and who did good service to his county in the Revolutionary War. It was built after the model of an English manor house, and is a quaint and interesting piece of architecture. Every room it contains is replete with historic memories. Heirlooms and relics both of the Stark and Morris families...

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Biography of Rev. Isaac G. Hubbard

Rev. Isaac G. Hubbard, at one time the rector of Trinity Church, Claremont, was born here, April 13, 1818, son of Isaac and Ruth (Cobb) Hubbard. His grandfather, George Hubbard, who was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War, came to Claremont in 1778 from Tolland, Conn. Judge J. H. Hubbard, of Windsor, a son of George, was one of the ablest lawyers in New England. He was a powerful man, and as a pleader at the bar he had few equals. Isaac Hubbard, another son, who settled in Claremont, became a successful farmer and stock-raiser. He was an influential man, served in different town offices, did much legal work, was Justice of the Peace, was considered a practical lawyer, and was prominent in the Episcopal church. He died in January, 1861, leaving a fine estate of some four hundred acres. By his first wife, a daughter of Ezra Jones, there was one child, a daughter, who married Charles F. Long, and had four children: Caroline, who died young; Charles H.; Isaac G.; and Charlotte B. The three last named are still living. His second wife, in maidenhood Ruth Cobb, daughter of Samuel Cobb, of Springfield, Vt., had four children. Amos, the eldest, now deceased, who was in the nursery business in Detroit, Mich., married Catharine, daughter of Samuel Fiske. She was half-sister of Philip Fiske, the donor of the...

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Biography of Albion H. French, M.D.

Albion H. French, M.D., a wellknown physician of Pittsfield, was born in Gilmanton N.H., March 27, 1847, son of Thomas H. and Sarah Ann (Brown) French. His great-grandfather, Ezekiel French, an Englishman, who was a pioneer of either Loudon or Hampton, N.H., spent his last days in Loudon, where he owned a farm. The second of Ezekiel’s two marriages was contracted with Sallie Smith. His son John was a native of Loudon. When a young man, John settled in Gilmanton, where he became a wealthy farmer, and died at the age of seventy-five years. He married Lucy T. Prescott, who lived to the advanced age of ninety-three or ninety-four years. She reared five children, of whom Thomas H., Albion H. French’s father, was the eldest. Of these children the survivors are: Ann M., the widow of William Brackett, late of Epsom, N.H.; and Warren B. The other two sons, John O. and Samuel P., were graduates of Dartmouth College and physicians. In the latter part of his life the father was a Republican. Both he and his wife were members of the Congregational church. Thomas H. French was born in Gilmanton in 1815. In early manhood he engaged in agriculture with a determination to succeed. He was rapidly becoming prosperous when he died, in the prime of life, aged thirty-seven years. He held a Captain’s commission in the State...

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Biography of David Halliday Moffat

David H. Moffat, one of the empire builders of the great West, was born at Washingtonville, Orange County, N. Y., in the year 1839. He died in New York City on March 1S, 1911. He was the youngest child of David Moffat and Catherine Gregg Moffat. The life of David H. Moffat can be properly termed one of the romances of the great Middle West, for he was connected with almost every important development between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains, particularly in the vicinity of Denver. He commenced his business career as a clerk in a New York bank at twenty years of age, and in 1860, shortly after the discovery of gold at Pike’s Peak, went to Denver, then a mining camp, where he established himself in the stationery business. That enterprise was first located in a tent, on the banks of Cherry Creek, where his little stock of newspapers, magazines and stationery was sold to the miners from a counter constructed by placing boards on the tops of two empty flour barrels. In a short time he was a clerk in the newly organized First National Bank of Denver, where he rose in rapid succession to the position of Cashier, and then President, a position which he held until his death. His name is inseparably connected with the mining industry of Colorado and the building...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Barker Odell

Benjamin B. Odell, thirty-seventh Governor of the State of New York, was born at Newburgh, N. Y., January 14, 1854. He was the son of Benjamin Barker and Ophelia (Bookstaver,) Odell. He graduated from Newburgh Academy in 1874, and entered Bethany College, in Bethany, W. Va., the same year. He remained there one year, after which he entered Columbia College, New York City, where he continued until 1877. He married Estelle Crist, of Newburgh, April 25, 1877; she died in 1888. His second wife was Mrs. Linda (Crist,) Traphagen, a sister of his first wife, whom he married in 1891. He was a member of the Republican State Committee 1884-96; Chairman of the Republican State Executive Committee 1898-1900; Member of the 54th and 55th Congresses 1895-9, 17th New York District; Governor of New York, two terms, 1901-5. He died at Newburgh, N. Y., May 9, 1926, aged 72...

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Biography of Dewitt Clinton

DeWitt Clinton was born at Little Britain, Orange County, N. Y., in. 1769. He died suddenly while engaged in official duty at Albany, February 11, 1828. His paternal ancestors, although long resident in Ireland, were of English origin, and his mother was of Dutch-French blood. He was educated at Columbia College, graduating with high honors. Choosing the law for his avocation, he studied law under Samuel Jones, afterwards Chief Justice of the United States Superior Court. He was admitted to the Bar in 1788 and entered immediately into political life, being an ardent supporter of his uncle, George Clinton. He took an active interest in the adoption of the Federal Constitution, and reported for the press the proceedings of the convention held for that purpose, also acting as private secretary for his uncle. His first office was Secretary of the Board of Regents of the University, and the next, Secretary of the Board of Commissioners of state fortifications. In 1797 he was elected to the State Assembly as a representative from New York City, where he made his residence, and the next year was chosen State Senator for four years. In 1802, when but 33 years of age, he was appointed a Senator of the United States. He labored for the abolition of slavery and its kindred barbarism, imprisonment for debt. Before his term as Senator expired he resigned...

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Biography of Joseph Wilkins

Joseph Wilkins, a resident of Pembroke and a veteran of the Civil War, was born May 24, 1844, son of Jeremiah Hall and Mary (Thompson) Wilkins. He is not only a representative of an old New Hampshire family, but a lineal descendant of ancestors who were first settlers in this country. Bray Wilkins, who came from Wales, Brecknock County, was a descendant of Lord John Wilkins, who belonged to a family that traced their lineage back to 1090 and had borne many honorable titles. Lord John was a connection of the Bishop Wilkins who married the sister of the Protector, Oliver Cromwell. Bray, at the age of twenty, is supposed to have come to this country in the same ship with Endicott, about 1630, and to have first settled in Dorchester, Mass. Before 1659 he bought from Governor Richard Bellingham seven hundred acres of land called Wills Hill, which in 1661 was within Salem’s six-mile limit. He died in 1702, a patriarchal land owner, amidst the farms and homes of his sons and daughters. The portion of Bray’s son, John Wilkins, was situated in Danvers, Mass. John, son of John, who was born about 1689, went with his wife, Mary Goodale Wilkins, and two sons to Marlboro, Mass., in 1740. His eldest son, Josiah Wilkins, married Lois Bush, whose grandparents settled in Marlboro in 1690. Of Josiah’s five sons,...

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Biography of Cyrus E. Baker, M.D.

Cyrus E. Baker, M.D., of Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H., the well-known physician and oculist, was born in Plainfield, this State, April 9, 1835, son of Dimic and Hannah (Colby) Baker. He is of the eighth generation in descent from Jeffrey Baker, who came from England, and was one of the original settlers of Windsor, Conn. Jeffrey Baker married November 25, 1642, Joan Rockwell. They had five children, one of them being a son, Joseph, born June 18, 1655, who married Hannah Cook Buckland, January 30, 1677. Five children were the fruit of this union. Joseph Baker’s son, Joseph, Jr., born April 13, 1678, was married on July 8, 1702, to Hannah Pomroy, by whom he had Joseph, Jr., second, and Samuel; and by his second wife, Abigail Bissel, he had John, Hannah, Jacob, Abigail, Ebenezer, Daniel, Heman, Titus, and Abigail. Joseph, Jr., second, died January 29, 1754; his wife, Abigail, died February 13, 1768. Their son, Heman, the next in this line, was born April 27, 1719. He married Lois Gilbert, November 24, 1747, and had the following children: Heman, Jr., who was a soldier Anna; Deborah; John; Oliver, who became a doctor of medicine; Abigail; Lois; Delight; and Lydia. Oliver Baker, son of Heman, was born at Tolland, Conn., October 5, 1755, and died October 3, 1811. He married Dorcas Dimic, March 23, 1780. She was born September...

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Slave Narrative of Rev. Wamble

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: Rev. Wamble Location: Gary, Indiana Place of Birth: Monroe County, Mississippi, Date of Birth: 1859 Place of Residence: 1827 Madison Street, Gary, Indiana Occupation: Wagon-maker Archie Koritz, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project Porter County-District #1 Valparaiso, Indiana EX-SLAVES REV. WAMBLE 1827 Madison Street Gary, Indiana [TR: above ‘Wamble’ in handwriting is ‘Womble’] Rev. Wamble was born a slave in Monroe County, Mississippi, in 1859. The Westbrook family owned many slaves in charge of over-seers who managed the farm, on which there were usually two hundred or more slaves. One of the Westbrook daughters married a Mr. Wamble, a wagon-maker. The Westbrook family gave the newly-weds two slaves, as did the Wamble family. One of the two slaves coming from the Westbrook family was Rev. Wamble’s grandfather. It seems that the slaves took the name of their master, hence Rev. Wamble’s grandfather was named Wamble. Families owning only a few slaves and in moderate circumstances usually treated their slaves kindly since like a farmer with only a few horses, it was to their best interest to see that their slaves were well provided for. The slaves were valuable, and there was no funds to buy others, whereas the large slave owners were wealthy and one slave more or less made little difference. The Reverend’s father and his brothers were children of original African slaves and...

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Biography of John MacDonald

John MacDonald of Topeka has probably done more for the cause of education in Kansas than any other one man, and in saying this no disparagement is intended for the scores of men and women who have devoted much of their lives to educational work. He may well be distinguished as a pioneer in the method of reason as applied to learning. His kindly personality has left a deep impress for good, and many who have achieved distinction in the different walks of life are indebted to him for their early training. Throughout his career he has evidently been impressed with the importance of the great truth that to educate is more important than to govern, since to train men wisely for self-government is more important than to govern them untrained. He is one of the men who have belped to vitalize education and the school system of the great State of Kansas. John MacDonald was born February 6, 1843, at Linshader, in the Lewis, a short distance from the Standing Stones of Callernish in the Parish of Uig, in the Hebrides. His birthplace will recall to a great many the land of Sheila, the “Princess of Thule,” made famous in the novel of that name by Black. When he was very small his people removed to the mainland of Scotland, to Gairloch in Wester Ross, where he was...

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Biography of Thomas E. Wagstaff

An attorney of long and successful experience in Montgomery County, both in Coffeyville and Independence, Thomas E. Wagstaff had been and is a leader in republican politics in the state, and a few years ago his name beeame known all over Kansas as a candidate for nomination to the office of governor. He lost the nomination by only a few votes. This was in 1910, when W. R. Stubbs was nominated and afterwards elected. His family have been identified with Kansas for forty years. Thomas E. Wagstaff was born at Galesburg, Illinois, July 23, 1875, and was still an infant when brought to this state. His father, Richard T. Wagstaff, who died at Lawrenec in 1901, is said to have been the best known traveling salesman in Kansas, and was known among retail merchants, the traveling fraternity in general, and a great host of other citizens by the affectionate title of “Uncle Dick.” For years he represented a hardware honse of St. Louis, and traveled over all the State of Kansas. He was born in Cork, Ireland, in 1842, a son of Robert Wagstaff, a native of the same place. The Wagstaff family in Ireland were of the gentry, and back in the times of the protectorate Oliver Cromwell gave thom grants of land which are still owned by their descendants. Robert Wagstaff came to America at the close...

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Biography of James W. Blain

One of the really remarkable men of Riley County, Kansas, is James W. Blain, who notwithstanding the weight of ninety-four years, still is actively interested in all that concerns the welfare of his state and county. For many years Mr. Blain was one of Riley County’s most enterprising, public spirited and useful men, a pioneer upbnilder, an honorable public offlcial, a substantial and successful agriculturist and an irreproachable citizen. He is one of the best known men in the county and is respected and esteemed throughout its length. James W. Blain was born at Warwick, Orange County, New York, September 17, 1822. His parents were Nathaniel and Polly (McCamley) Blain, both of whom were born in the United States, but the father was of Scotch-Irish lineage. When James W. was twelve years old, his parents moved to Goshen, New York, where his mother died, and a few years later the father removed to New York City. The boy had but limited educational opportunities and early was thrown entirely upon his own resources. He worked as a clerk in stores in New York City until he was uineteen years of age, when he secured a position with a land company operating as Hicks & Co., and went to Hicksville, in Northwestern Ohio. There he kept the books and did copying for the company. In 1856 Mr. Blain came to Kansas,...

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