Location: New York City New York

Early New England People

Sarah Titcomb over her years of study of various New England families had collected quite a bit of material of several early New England families. At the bequest of some of her friends, she prepared and published them in book form. When reading through the material I was impressed with the amount of material collected on each individual, and rather then a brief genealogical sketch, readers are provided an in-depth study of each early family: Ayer, Bartlett, Bradley, Chase, Dean, Dow, Dunster, Ellis, Fuller, Hope, Kilby, Martine, Les Dernier, Maverick, Mills, Montague, Pemberton, Pepperrell, Poore, Precott, Sewall, Longfellow, Spofford, Titcomb, Watmough, and Willard.

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Biography of Doctor Horace Hatch

The son of Honorable Reuben and Eunice (Dennison) Hatch, was born at Tunbridge, Vermont, May 23, 1788. He was educated at Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1814, and studied medicine at the same institution, receiving the degree of M. D. in 1817. He settled in the practice of his profession at Norwich the same year, where he pursued the active and laborious duties of a country physician for twenty years. He married January 9, 1821, Mary Yates, daughter of Thomas Smith. His children were born here. In the year, he built upon nearly the same ground where Captain Joseph Hatch had first fixed his abode, the brick dwelling house, now the residence of Mrs. Converse, widow of Doctor Shubael Converse, who in 1837 purchased the property and succeeded to the business of Doctor Hatch; the latter removing to Burlington, Vermont, where he prosecuted his profession for another period of twenty years. In 1861 Doctor Hatch accepted an appointment in the Treasury department at Washington where he continued about four years. While thus employed he rendered valuable service in visiting and relieving many sick and wounded Vermont soldiers in hospitals in and about Washington, whose days and nights of suffering were cheered by his kindly sympathy and by delicacies and comforts provided from his generous purse. In 1865 he became a resident of New York City, where he died...

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Biography of George Partridge Colvocoresses

Born in Norwich, April 3d, 1847, only son of Captain George Musalas and Eliza F. Colvocoresses. During the civil war he served in the navy as captain’s clerk for over two years on board the U. S. ships “Supply” and ” Saratoga.” He was a cadet at Norwich University and subsequently entered the U. S. Naval Academy in 1864, graduating in 1869. His naval service has been performed on all the foreign stations and on shore as an instructor at the Naval Academy and at the Hydrographic Office. Promoted to Ensign 1870, Master 1872, Lieutenant 1875, Lieutenant-Commander 1897. Commander 1900, Captain 1905. Lieutenant-Commander Colvocoresses was executive officer of the cruiser “Concord” in Commodore Dewey’s squadron at Manila and was advanced five numbers in his grade for “eminent and conspicuous conduct in battle.” He returned home as executive officer of the flag-ship “Olympia.” The following two years he was engaged in preparing for publication the “Naval War Records of the Rebellion,” after which he was appointed to the command of the U. S. Cruiser “Lancaster,” and later the cruiser “Yankee.” Since the expiration of this sea duty he has been employed, at the New York Navy Yard. Commander Colvocoresses married Miss Mary Dwight Baldwin of New York City in 1875 and has two sons, George M., a graduate of Yale University, and mining engineer, and Harold, lieutenant U. S. Marine...

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Biography of Prof. George Bush

George Bush, one of the most eminent Biblical scholars and Orientalists of his time in America, was born in Norwich, Vt., June 12, 1796, a son of John and Abigal (Marvin) Bush, and grandson of Capt. Timothy Bush. The boyhood of George Bush was mostly passed in Hanover, New Hampshire, whither his father removed when he was quite young. The son gave early indications of superior intelligence. His eldest sister says “he had a ravishing love of books from her first remembrance of him.” He frequented the College library at Hanover and would bring home ponderous volumes, almost as large as he could carry. Old residents remember him riding to mill on horseback with his face hidden in the pages of an open book that he held before him. At the age of nineteen he entered Dartmouth College, graduating in 1818 with the valedictory and the highest honors of his class, which was of more than average ability, containing among others such scholars as Professor William Chamberlain of Dartmouth College, and the late Professor Thomas C. Upham of Bowdoin College. During a part of his college course, Mr. Bush was a private tutor in the family of Honorable Mills Olcott, and there probably was formed an intimate friendship between himself and Rufus Choate of the class of 1819. The two young men chummed together during the college course, and...

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Biographical Sketch of George E. Seely

George E. Seely, justice of the peace in the third township was elected to office two years ago. This was his first experience in public life and since first taking his oath of office he has by fairness, thoroughness and soundness of his decisions, attracted county-wide attention as a magistrate. Mr. Seely is a machinist by trade and has worked at his profession in Redwood City for nine years. Being an able mechanic and of an inventive turn of mind, Mr. Seely has several patents which in time bid to make him famous. Justice Seely’s modesty has made these almost unknown to his friends but they are of such merit that big manufacturers have examined them. Some which are now in Justice Seely’s hands for minor improvements will soon be on the market. Mr. Seely is a collector of autographs and he has the genuine signatures of many of the famous men of the world. He is also known as a great reader and a deep thinker. His knowledge of law was obtained by night study while following his ‘vocation. George Everett Seely was born in New York City and is a comparatively young man. He was married on April 14, 1896. He has lived in San Mateo county for the past nine years living all this time in Redwood where he has property interests. Justice Seely is a...

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Biographical Sketch of Mark E. Ryan

Mark E. Ryan, electrical contractor and proprietor of Ryan’s Electrical Store in the Sequoia Hotel Bldg., Redwood City, arrived in that city seven years ago, after lie had traveled in all parts of the United States. The climatic advantages and business opportunities quickly appealed to Mr. Ryan, and lie decided to establish himself in business in Redwood City and make it his home. Mr. Ryan has had a wide and varied experience in electrical work which he has followed since boyhood. After completing his education in -New York City, he worked as a lineman in New York and large cities of the east. Since then he has been in charge of important work for large companies in all parts of the United States. Mr. Ryan’s electrical store is one of the thriving businesses of Redwood City and one of the most complete and best equipped shops of its kind on the peninsula. This firm has taken many large contracts for the electrical work in public buildings, industrial plants and country mansions; and the character of its work is known in all parts of the county. Mark E. Ryan was born in New York City on February 15, 1884. He was married in San Mateo in 1909 to Miss Mary Britt, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. Britt, pioneer residents of San Mateo. He has three children, Mark E. Jr.,...

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Biography of Sean Perichon

Mr.Perichon is the popular host at the Perichon House; and in the role of hotel keeper and genial host is, probably one of the best known and well liked characters in the city of San Mateo as well as the entire county. Mr. Perichon was born at Vichy, France, September 24, 1870, just a few months before the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71. When a comparatively young man he came to America where he has lived ever since during the last twenty-one years. His first years in this country were spent in New York City where he followed the occupation of hotel keeper with marked success and achieved an enviable reputation in his chosen calling. After five years he decided to come to California; and it so happened that he came first to San Mateo where he has lived ever since. Ten years ago Mr. Perichon was married to a lady of his own country, Miss Eugenie Rouquette. The couple have two children, Jeanne, aged three and Marguerite who is eight years old. At the time of his marriage Mr. Perichon purchased the property upon which he built the attractive hotel which he is still running. The Perichon House was originally built with one dining room in the front, but this has since been added to and the dining room enlarged to accomodate the ever increasing patronage....

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Biography of James C. Murray

Prominent among the enterprising and substantial business men of Jamesport is the subject of this sketch. James C. Murray was born in Belmont county, Ohio, April 8, 1847. He is the son of John and Rose (Moneghan) Murray, natives of Ireland. His education was acquired in the schools of his native State and immediately after leaving school, at the early age of sixteen years, he enlisted under the stars and stripes in Company E, Ninety-eighth Ohio Infantry, but had great difficulty in getting into the army on account of youthfulness, being several times dismissed and ordered home by the drilling officers, but nothing daunted young Murray’s indomitable perseverance and pluck finally prevailed and he was mustered into the army in the month of July, 1862, and subsequently participated in the battles of Perryville, Chicamauga, Missionary Ridge; was wounded at Jonesborough, Georgia, and sent thence to Nashville, Tennessee, arriving in titne to be present on the occasion of the battle in and around Nashville, where the Federal forces, under General George B. Thomas, brought to a disastrous close the Confederate General John B. Hood’s campaign in Tennessee. While convelascing in the hospital he was detailed as steward, and had under his charge one hundred and twenty patients, one of whom was taken with the smallpox, and in assisting. him in an ambulance, he contracted that dread disease and for four weeks...

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Goehring, Lewis – Obituary

Lewis Goehring, 83, died at his home, 223 North Marion Street, Tuesday [October 22, 1935] at 7:30 p.m. after a long illness. He was a veteran grain merchant. Mr. Goehring was born in New York City, March 11, 1852, coming to this section of Iowa when he was 2 years of age. He was engaged in the grain business with Jones & Buchanan, later with the W. E. Jones Co., and with E. M. Robertson. He was a member of the Woodmen of the World and a charter member of the Modern Woodman. He was also a member of the First Baptist Church. Surviving are his wife, Laura; daughter, Mrs. Hugh Darran of Ottumwa; son, Edward Goehring of Holdrege, Neb.; stepson, Harry Harker, and stepdaughter, Mrs. Oscar Swanson, both at home; four sisters, Mrs. Josie Hibler of Ft. Madison, Mrs. Maggie Wilson of Ottumwa, Mrs. Lizzie Allman of Fremont and Mrs. Mollie Dean of Oskaloosa; two brothers, Dave Goehring of Ottumwa vicinity and Ed of Lime Springs; eight grandchildren, and nine great grandchildren, a brother, Phil; preceded him in death. Funeral services will be held Thursday at 1:30 p.m. at the Daggett Funeral Chapel, conducted by the Rev. Fred Smith. Burial will be made in the Ottumwa Cemetery. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Abstracts of Wills on File in the City of New York Surrogate’s Office 1660-1680

Abstracts of wills on file in the surrogate’s office city of New York 1660-1680. From May 1787 to the present, county surrogate’s courts have recorded probates. However, the court of probates and court of chancery handled estates of deceased persons who died in one county but who owned property in another. An 1823 law mandated that all probates come under the jurisdiction of the county surrogate’s courts. Each surrogate’s court has a comprehensive index to all probate records, including the unrecorded probate packets. Interestingly enough, there are wills existing and on record at the Surrogate’s Office in New York City for the time-span of 1660-1680. Genealogical extracts of these wills have been provided below.

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Biographical Sketch of Edwin Archer

(See Downing)-Edwin Archer, born September 19, 1817 in New York City. Married February 26, 1845 Mary Francis Vann, born September 21, 1825 in Georgia. He died May 15, 1893. They were the parents of: Mary Elizabeth, married DeWitt Clinton Lipe; Louisa Catherine, married Freeland McIntosh; Ada, born March 16, 1860, educated in the Cherokee public schools and the Kirkwood (Missouri) Seminary, from which she graduated June 8, 1882, married February 28, 1888, Daniel Vincent Jones, born December 28, 1858 in Grayson county, Texas; Cora, married William Ross Shackelford; Carlotta Archer, graduated from the Cherokee Female Seminary June 28, 1883, appointed member of the Cherokee Board of Education; appointed County Superintendent of Public Instruction of Mayes county in July 1908, elected to that office in 1910-12-16-18 and 1920. Daniel Vincent and Ada (Archer) Jones were the parents of: Vera, born December 10, 1895, graduated from the Female Seminary May 29, 1907; Jean, born December 2, 1895, and Mary Jones, born July 15, 1899. Joseph Vann, born February 11, 1798, married Catherine Rowe. He was elected a member of the Cherokee Constitutional Convention of 1827 from Coosawatee District; elected Senator from the Salina District August 20, 1841, and elected President of the Senate; elected again to the same office August 6, 1849; elected Associate Justice of the Supreme court in 1847, Delegate to Washington 1851, Executive Councilor 185355-57; Assistant Chief of...

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Biography of George C. Diestilhorst

George C. Diestilhorst was born in Poile, Hanover, Germany, April 18, 1813, and was there reared to manhood. He received his education in the Lutheran school, of his native place, and his father being a harness-maker by trade, on leaving school he also learned that trade and worked with his father up to the time he was twenty-three years of age, when he emigrated to America, arriving in New York City, May 1, 1836. He was successful in securing a situation in the government harness manufactory in that city, and remained six months, then went on a prospecting tour, seeking employment, to the cities of Schenectady and Buffalo, New York, Cleveland, Ohio, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, reaching this latter city in May, 1837, and worked at his trade there until the following October. He was next employed on a keel-boat on the Ohio River, and went to Cincinnati, thence to Louisville, Kentucky, but was unable to secure work because of his unfamiliarity with the English language. From Louisville he went to New Albany, Indiana, where he worked three weeks at his trade, then went down the Ohio River to Smithland, at the confluence of the Cumberland and Ohio rivers and from there traveled overland on foot, with occasional rides in farm wagons, to Princeton, Kentucky, arriving in December, 1837, and secured employment until the spring of 1838. Next he went...

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Biography of James W. Blain

One of the really remarkable men of Riley County, Kansas, is James W. Blain, who notwithstanding the weight of ninety-four years, still is actively interested in all that concerns the welfare of his state and county. For many years Mr. Blain was one of Riley County’s most enterprising, public spirited and useful men, a pioneer upbnilder, an honorable public offlcial, a substantial and successful agriculturist and an irreproachable citizen. He is one of the best known men in the county and is respected and esteemed throughout its length. James W. Blain was born at Warwick, Orange County, New York, September 17, 1822. His parents were Nathaniel and Polly (McCamley) Blain, both of whom were born in the United States, but the father was of Scotch-Irish lineage. When James W. was twelve years old, his parents moved to Goshen, New York, where his mother died, and a few years later the father removed to New York City. The boy had but limited educational opportunities and early was thrown entirely upon his own resources. He worked as a clerk in stores in New York City until he was uineteen years of age, when he secured a position with a land company operating as Hicks & Co., and went to Hicksville, in Northwestern Ohio. There he kept the books and did copying for the company. In 1856 Mr. Blain came to Kansas,...

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