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Location: New Orleans Louisiana

Alfred Lewis Todd of McComb MS

Alfred Lewis Todd10, (Wilmer L.9, Henry8, Ezra L.7, Ezra L.6, James5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born May, 13, 1876, in New Orleans, La., married at McComb City, Miss., Adele Ford, who was born Jan. 14, 1884, in McComb City, Miss., where they were living in 1918. Child: 2819. Belden Wilmer, b. Aug. 22,...

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Hubert Grey Todd of New Orleans LA

Hubert Grey Todd9, (James A.8, Alfred7, Caleb6, Caleb5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 1, 1872, in Sherman, Mich., married Jan. 16, 1907, Annie Lee, daughter of Frederick A. and Lee J. (Guice) Dicks, who was born Oct. 30, 1876, in Natchez, Miss., her father having been born in Mississippi and her mother in Minnesota. He went with his parents in 1874, to Burr Oak, Mich., where he attended school and graduated from the High School there in 1888. He took a commercial course in 1892. He began learning the printing business in March 1888, when he secured a position with L. H. Mallery. He later worked in various printing offices in St. Joseph county and Kalamazoo, Mich., from 1888 to 1897, as opportunity offered; in 1897 he secured a position with the United States Weather Bureau as printer, and a couple of years later he was promoted to the position of observer, continuing in that service until Oct. 1908, having been assigned to the offices in Columbus and Cleveland, O., Atlanta, Ga., Jacksonville, Fla., and New Orleans, La., resigning at the latter place, to go into the printing business for himself, which he has since continued. Mr. Todd was the president of the New Orleans union Epworth League for three years. Child: 2562. Katherine Grey, b. June 2, 1909, in New...

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Mulvehill, J. T. Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. J. T. Mulvehill, a former resident of Union, died in the Baker Hospital Sunday, December 1, 1918. The funeral took place Monday, December 2, from the Catholic Church in Baker. Josephine La Notte Mulvehill was born in New Orleans, May 28, 1862, and died in Baker, Oregon, December 1, 1918. She was taken suddenly ill Friday night November 29-her ailment was pronounced acute diabetes. She was rushed to St. Elizabeth’s hospital at Baker, early Saturday morning, where every possible aid was given her, but she passed away Sunday forenoon at 11 o’clock, surrounded by all her family. The Mulvehills have been residents of Oregon 21 years, residing in Union all of the time, except the last three years, when they moved to a ranch near Haines. Mrs. Mulvehill is survived by her husband, J. T. Mulvehill; two sons, Andreas and Leo, of Haines; two daughters, Mrs. Alva Peters and Mrs. Herman White, of North Powder. She was a loving and affectionate wife and mother, a kind friend and neighbor, beloved by all who knew her. The funeral services where held at Baker, Monday December 2, at 4 p. m. at St. Francis Cathedral, Rev. Father August E. Loeser officiating. The remains were shipped the same night to Portland for cremation and were accompanied by all of the immediate family. Mrs. Mulvehill was a member of Preston W. R....

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Biography of James T. O’pry

James T. O’pry, one of the representative and enterprising merchants of Colton, has a well equipped general merchandise store, centrally located on Front street opposite the Southern Pacific Railroad depot. Captain O’Pry came to Colton in February 1888, after years spent in active business pursuits in New Orleans, and in the next month established himself in mercantile pursuits. He also purchased a five-acre tract of orange land from the Colton Water Company and commenced horticultural industries by planting it with budded orange trees; and he is also interested in real estate in Colton, Glendora and other places. He is a popular man, straightforward in his dealings, and has gained a liberal support and patronage from the Colton community. Captain O’Pry is a native of Georgia, dating his birth in 1849. His parents, James and Nancy E. (Brown) O’Pry, are also natives of that State. During the days of his infancy his parents moved to New Orleans, and he was reared and schooled in that city. Early in life, in his boyhood days, he was schooled in mercantile life, but when twenty years of age chose steam boating as his calling, and entered upon a three years’ apprenticeship as a pilot. He was ambitious and quick to learn, and rose rapidly in his profession until he was licensed as a master, and was then placed in command of various steamers...

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Biography of Benton O. Johnson

Benton O. Johnson, one of Redlands best known and highly respected citizens, is a native of Connecticut, born at Bethlehem, April 20, 1855. His parents were David and Sophia (Stone) Johnson, both of whom came of old Connecticut families, and the father a merchant. B. O. Johnson was but two years of age when his parents removed to the South. They resided at various places throughout the Southern country, among them New Orleans, Matamoras, Brownsville, etc., and the outbreak of the civil war found the elder Johnson carrying on the dry-goods business. In 1863 the family left the South and returned to Connecticut, trade being much interfered with on account of the war. They located at Middlebury, whence they afterward removed to West Haven. At the last named place and at New Haven, the subject of this sketch was educated. He commenced his business career as a drug clerk with Dr. Shepherd, at West Haven, with whom he continued for five years; then went in business for himself at Deep River, Connecticut. There he remained until 1883, when he came to California, locating at Redlands. He followed ranching two years, but then gave it up to resume mercantile life. He purchased the store formerly conducted by George A. Cook, in Lugonia, and was in business there until February, 1889, when he sold out to V. L. Mitchell, with whose...

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Biography of John Hall, M. D.

John Hall, M. D., was born near Leeds, Yorkshire County, England, in 1819. He was reared and schooled in his native place, and early in life learned the printer’s trade. In 1845 he came to the United States and located in La Fayette County, Wisconsin, and, after a visit to New Orleans, was there engaged in the lead mines as a smelter. In 1848 he went to Canada, where he engaged in work at his trade as a printer in Toronto. He also entered upon the study of medicine in the Toronto School of Medicine. In 1857 he returned to the United States and entered the Western Homeopathic College at Cleveland, Ohio. He graduated at that institution in 1858, and in the same year married Miss Dorothea Stahl, a native of Darke County, Ohio. Mrs. Hall was educated as a physician and graduated at the Homeopathic College in the same class with Dr. Hall. The Doctor and his wife then located at Cincinnati, Ohio, and entered upon the practice of their profession. In 1860 they removed to New York City, and there continued their calling until 1873. In that year they came to California and located in Riverside. Upon his arrival, Dr. Hall bought a claim for forty-one acres of Government land about one and one-half miles south and east of Riverside, located upon what is now known as...

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Biographical Sketch of A. Shay

A. Shay, of San Bernardino, was born in Maine, May 1, 1812, but reared principally in Nova Scotia. He learned the cooper’s and carpenter’s trades. When a young man he went to New Orleans, where he was successful for three years. Seeing then a specimen of gold from California, in 1849, he at once set out for the gold fields, coming by water and the Isthmus of Panama. He worked in the mines for a time and made and lost a great deal of money-lost heavily by the floods in the upper country. Then he carried on a large sheep ranch at City creek for a number of years, and he lived also for some time in Los Angeles County, and finally he came to San Bernardino County, where he has dealt to a considerable extent in lands and has engaged in the rearing of live-stock and in fruit culture. In 1852 he married Eliza E. Gosey, a native of Arkansas, and they have five children: John, Thomas, William, Henry and Mary. The mother died several years ago. Mr. Shay has given all his children a comfortable home and a good start in...

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Biography of John B. Crawford

John B. Crawford is one of the pioneers of California, dating his first arrival on the Pacific coast early in 1849. His first visit to Southern California was also in that year. Mr. Crawford was born in York Township, County of Peal, Canada, in 1826. His parents, James and Eliza (Beatty) Crawford, were natives of Ireland, who immigrated to Canada in 1810. His mother was a daughter of Rev. John Beatty, a well-known pioneer of the Methodist Church. She is now eighty-five years of age and a resident of Riverside. His father was a prominent businessman of York, owning and conducting lumber mills and woolen factories. Mr. Crawford was reared and schooled in his native place, ending his studies by a course at the Victoria College at Coburg, Ontario. He then went to Montreal and was engaged in the hardware business until 1847. In that year he immigrated to the United States and located in New Orleans. In 1848 the gold fever swept over the country and he decided to seek his fortunes in the new El Dorado of the West. In December, of that year, he left New Orleans and proceeded to the Isthmus of Panama. Crossing that he embarked on board the steamer ” California” for San Francisco. This was the pioneer steamer of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, and the first ever placed on the route...

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Society of Mississippi Choctaw 1916

A sharp distinction is to be drawn between the Indians in Mississippi and the so-called Mississippi Choctaw “claimants.” The former are few in numbers and easily ascertainable, while the latter are numerous and scattered from Bayou Labatre, Alabama on the east to Mesa City, Arizona on the west. A number of these claimants are banded together in an organization known as “Society of Mississippi Choctaws.” Bayou Labatre, Alabama Sarah E. Bosarge Andrews Armenia Bosarge Andrews Claral Bosarge Akridge Bessie Golman Bosarge Amile Bosarge Hubert Bosarge Hubbard Bosarge John J. Briant George H. Briant Albert L. Demore Nora Wintzell Golman Mac BriantRobertson Ella Golman Simonson Marshall Bosarge, Coden, AL John Gorlott, Theodore, AL Minnie Le Bosarge Andrews William E. Akridge Fannie Andrews Arnett Hubert L. Bosarge Corlott Corlell Bosarge Albert Bosarge Dora Bosarge Willie Lester Briant Margaret Briant Cain Robert Golman Carrie Andrews Lander Rosa Sheppard Annie Andrews Simonson Olive Wintzell Mesa City, Arizona Susanna Glover Williams Diane, Louisiana Addie Williamson Petty Franklington, Louisiana William P. Knight Mattie Green Magee Hackney, Louisiana Marshal Barber Rosa Thomas Barber John M Duncan Aca Dallus Duncan Rosella Thomas Duncan Garlen M. C. Duncan Loran Thomas Duncan Alice Thomas Duncan James Erwin Julia V. Thomas Erwin Norma Knight Norman Knight James Knight Thomas E. Magee Lucy Duncan Thomas William H. Thomas Edward Thomas Margania Thomas Matthew Thomas Noah Thomas Perry E. Thomas Esley Thomas...

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Biography of John Dovell

JOHN DOVELL. – Mr. Dovell is one of those men who have belabored fortune, and have knocked about the world until it is sufficient to turn one’s hair gray simply to listen to their adventures. A native of the Azores, of Portuguese parentage and born in 1836, he came to Portland, Maine, at the age of fourteen, and learned shipbuilding. He left in four years and plied his trade in New Orleans, shipping thence to Liverpool, and coming as ship’s carpenter from that foreign port to San Francisco. He soon came up the coast to Portland, Oregon, and worked upon the steam ferry Independence, building near the “South End Sawmill” by Powell, Coffin, “Preacher” Kelly, and Hankins, the captain, to run opposition to Stevens’ ferry. Starting for the Frazer river mines in 1859, he met a number of friends at Victoria, and, together with seventeen of them, put across the Georgian Gulf in rowboats, making a dangerous passage. They then followed up the river by the Skilloot route to Horse Beef bar, the company then separating and going to prospecting. Dovell made no strike. Some twenty of the company on the way back went down to the Littoot Lake, and in the absence of a boat to go down to Langley were compelled to take one by force from one Robertson, for which high-handed act they were arrested upon...

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Biography of James G. Sandidge

James G. Sandidge. In the colonial history of the United States may be found frequent mention of names that are familiar and even distinguished at present throughout the great Middle West. They ring with achievement as in the old days, and although generations have passed since their first bearers lived and labored and increased on American soil, the stock is the same and the vigor of the younger branches gives testimony to the strength of the parent root. A long line of notable men have borne the name of Sandidge, from the founding of Jamestown, Virginia, and the early settlement of Charleston, South Carolina. A well known representative of this old and prominent family is found in Dr. James G. Sandidge, surgeon, banker and capitalist, who for almost a quarter of a century has been a foremost citizen of Mulberry, Kansas. James G. Sandidge was born November 12, 1870, in the City of New Orleans, Louisiana. His parents were James G. and Susan K. (Wilson) Sandidge, the former of whom was born at New Orleans in 1840 and is the only surviving child of his parents, Hon. John M. and Mary E. (Gilmer) Sandidge. The grandfather of Doctor Sandidge was born in 1819, in Alabama, and died at New Orleans in 1908. He was reared in Alabama and did not remove to Louisiana until after his marriage. In early...

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Biography of George Ridgeley Broadbere

George Ridgeley Broadbere editor of the Santa Ana Free Press, was born in New York city and educated at Cambridge University, England. He began the newspaper business as war correspondent while serving in the naval brigade in the Zulu war in Africa, and while there he was severely wounded. In China he did war correspondence for the London Daily News. Returning to America, he was employed on the New Orleans Picayune as reporter and traveling correspondent in Louisiana and Texas; next he was a traveling agent and correspondent for the States of the great southwest for the St. Louis Globe-Democrat; then he was on the local force of the Kansas City Times, and then going to Lawrence, Kansas, he took charge of the local pages of the Kansas Daily Tribune. In 1881 he established the Mirror at Tongawoxie, Kansas, but losing his health he was compelled to seek the high altitudes of New Mexico, where he was for some time city editor of the Albuquerque Journal; thence he came to Los Angeles and worked on the Times and the Express. As soon as it was settled beyond dispute that Orange County was to be organized, he established the Free Press at Santa Ana, the county seat, with Lester Osborn as business manager. He recently bought out Mr. Osborn and organized a stock company under the name and title of...

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Biographical Sketch of Galland, S., Dr.

Dr. S. Galland, physician and surgeon, came to North Topeka, Kan. In 1870, and practiced medicine a year; thence to Kansas City, Mo., and practiced his profession two years, when he moved to Dodge City, Kan., and permanently located, where he has been engaged in the practice of medicine until 1878, since which time he has retired from active business. He was born in Posen, Prussia, Germany, May 11, 1822, and was educated in his native country. He graduated from the old school of medicine at Berlin, in the class of 1847. Practiced in Germany two years, when, in 1849, he came to America, locating in New York City, in his profession until 1851; thence went to California and followed his profession until 1857. He then went to St. Louis, Mo., practicing his profession there and at New Orleans, La., until 1868, when he located in Kansas City, Mo., until he came to Kansas. He ran a hotel about six years in Dodge City. Was married October 13, 1858, to Miss Bertha Leon, born in Cassal High, Germany, December 12, 1825. He has served as Township Treasurer, City Alderman, etc. He is a member of the Masonic order, including the ten first degrees of...

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Biography of Jacob Kamm

No history of navigation upon the Willamette or Columbia would be complete without reciting the part borne by the subject of this sketch. From the time the demands of travel and commerce created business of any magnitude in this direction, down to the present time, he has been more or less prominently connected with this interest, and especially important was the part he bore in the incipient stages of its development. He was born in Switzerland, December 12, 1823. At the age of eight, with his father, who had resigned his commission as captain in the Swiss army, he came to America. They removed to Illinois, where for a year his father was employed in farming and milling. From there they went to St. Louis, where his father conducted a hotel for some years, after which they removed to New Orleans. Here, at the age of twelve, young Kamm commenced the earnest side of life in a printing office, where he was employed until after the death of his father during the fearful yellow fever epidemic in the summer of 1837. In the fall of that year with only a few dollars in his pocket, he started for St. Louis. Upon his arrival he secured a position as a cabin boy on a small steamer called the Ark. In the engineer of this steamer he found a kind friend,...

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Biographical Sketch of James Brown

Jim Brown purchased land in Section 25 of Battle Township, Ida County, Iowa, on October 10, 1873. On March 29, 1874, he came back to live on the farm. James Brown was born in Perry County, Ohio, January 16, 1843. He was from a family of 13 children, nine sons and 4 daughters. His father was John Brown and he was born in 1800 in Waterford County, Ireland, and at the age of 15 came to the United States, landing at New Orleans. He worked for 7 years in the Carolinas and Georgia, and then located in Perry County, Ohio, where he married Mary Clark who came here to the United States from Ireland when a little girl. He came to Jackson County, Iowa, and settled on what was then the frontier. John passed away in 1862. Jim Brown learned his school lessons in a little log schoolhouse in Jackson County. At the age of 25 he married Margaret, settled on a farm in that county and farmed there until 1874. Then he came to Ida County and settled on wild land. He plowed the first furrow ever broken in the western part of the county in Battle Township. Wolves and deer were plenty all around. There was not a house between his farm and Judge John H. Moorehead’s land at the grove of trees where Moorehead had built...

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