Location: New Orleans Louisiana

Biography of Mark Carley

Mark Carley was one of the founders of the city of Champaign: His name appears again and again in connection with the early annals of that city and of Champaign County, and always he appears as a man of force, of almost unlimited enterprise and of a public spirit that was in keeping with his many successes in private life. He knew much of the world by experience and had come to Champaign County soon after returning from an excursion to California during the great gold excitement on the Pacific Coast. His own life was to a large degree the expression of those forces’ accumulated and inherited by him from a notable American ancestry. The Carleys were staunch and patriotic New Englanders. Mark Carley was born at Hancock in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, August 24, 1799. He was a son of Elijah and Agnes (Graham) Carley and a grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Washburn) Carley. He was thus related to the Washburns whose names appear frequently in New England history, and from the same family came the Washburns who were conspicuous in the early days of Illinois. The Carleys were of Scotch-Irish ancestry. They settled in America long before the Revolution, and one of the cherished possessions of the descendants is a discharge paper signed by George Washington and granting release from the Continental Army to Jonathan Carley, an...

Read More

Biography of John F. Sheehan

JOHN F. SHEEHAN. – The gentleman whose name heads this brief memoir, an excellent portrait of whom appears in this history, has been a leading business man and resident of Port Townsend, Washington for almost thirty years. Mr. Sheehan is a native of the Sunny south, and was born in Baltimore Maryland, in 1840. When but an infant he suffered the irreparable loss of his father by death. His widowed mother then, with her two sons, our subject being but eighteen months old, paid a visit to Ireland, and at the end of one year returned to Baltimore. John F. was then taken by an uncle to New Orleans, where he received his education and resided until fifteen years of age. He then started out to do for himself, still being but a mere boy. He started for the Pacific coast, coming via the Nicaragua route, and arrived in San Francisco in the summer of 1856. The first two years in the Golden state were spent in the mines and at different occupations until the breaking out of the ever-memorable Frazer River excitement, when Mr. Sheehan joined the gold-seekers and came north, only to find on arriving at the mines that “All is not gold that glitters,” and also to find that the great excitement which had lured thousands was a humbug. On leaving the mines Mr. Sheehan came...

Read More

Biography of James B. Coakley

Among the enterprises of Weiser which are alike creditable to the city and to their proprietors is the Vendome Hotel, which was built by its present owners and managers, Messrs. McGregor and Coakley, and by them opened for business in February, 1891. Since that time the hotel has gained a very favorable reputation with the traveling public and enjoys a large patronage. It is a brick structure, two stories high, and contains twenty-eight rooms, well finished, well furnished, well ventilated and nicely kept. Great care is given to the perfection of all arrangements which will contribute to the comfort of the guests, and from the daintily spread tables, supplied with all the delicacies of the season, to the tastefully appointed parlors, all is harmonious and attractive. Malcolm McGregor, the senior member of the firm of McGregor & Coakley, was born in Picton, Nova Scotia, on the 14th of January 1845, and in his youth learned the machinist’s trade. He afterward operated a stationary engine and worked at his trade both in San Francisco. California, and Virginia City, Nevada. In 1871 he removed to Silver City, Idaho, where he accepted the position of chief engineer of the Ida Elmore mine and mill. He also conducted the Idaho Hotel there for some time, but came to Weiser in 1885. Here he engaged in raising sheep, also conducted a hotel, but abandoned...

Read More

Biography of Mason A. Cornwall

This honored citizen of Moscow has now attained the venerable age of seventy-seven years, yet largely possesses the vigor of a man in his prime. His life has been a busy, useful and honorable one, and has been crowned with a rich measure of success as the fitting reward of his labors and his well directed energies. He is still actively interested in business affairs and in all that is connected with the state’s prosperity and progress, and is one of the most valued citizens of Idaho. Old age is not necessarily a synonym of weakness or inactivity. It need not suggest as a matter of course want of occupation or helplessness. There is an old age that is a benediction to all that comes in contact with it, that gives out of its rich stores of learning and experience, and grows stronger intellectually and spiritually as the years pass. Such is the life of Mr. Cornwall, an encouragement to his associates and an example well worthy of emulation to the young. Mason A. Cornwall was born in Truxton, Cortland County, New York, December 2, 1821, and is a descendant of an old English family that numbers many prominent men among its representatives. Four Cornwall brothers emigrated to New England in 1636, and founded the family in Connecticut and Rhode Island. William Cornwall settled in Hartford, Connecticut, and became...

Read More

Biography of Job Francis Dye

Among the figures who stand prominently forth on the pages of western history is the gentleman whose name introduces this review. His was a marvelous record of long connection with the events which go to make up the annals of the Pacific coast. He was one of those honored pioneers who blazed a path for future cavalcades to follow; who bravely turned their faces from the cities of the east, with all the advantages of wealth and civilization, and cast their fortunes with the western frontier, in all its wildness and primitive modes of life; who, rather than enjoy the comforts of their former homes, chose to endure the hardships of a wider and freer country; and who made out of those very obstacles, which, to a weaker class of men would have been stumbling blocks, the stepping stones to wealth and renown, none of these great men are more noted for untiring perseverance and steady progress which have resulted in the acquirement of wealth and the well merited esteem of their fellow men than the gentleman whose name heads this memoir. He realized with great prophetic foresight the magnitude of the prospects of the west, and that at a time when this section of the country gave but slight signs of her future greatness. If, as is maintained, the history of a country is best told in the...

Read More

Biography of Isaac N. Cromwell, M.D.

ISAAC N. CROMWELL, M.D. – Perhaps there is no calling of men with which the issues of life and death are so intimately connected s with that of the physician: hence it is that popular sentiment demands a class of men to take up this profession who are in every sense of the word the leaders of their fellows, and especially endowed with keen perception, careful and discriminating judgment, alert faculties and sympathy, with perfect self-possession and steady nerve. The subject of this sketch is one of the votaries of the medical muse, and is today one of Union county’s leading practitioners, being a man of deep erudition, sound principles and perfect integrity, which have been manifested in a long, skillful, and successful practice that is large and exacting. Isaac N. Cromwell was born in Murray county, Georgia, on November 27, 1841, being the son of James and Margaret (Shields) Cromwell, farmers of that section. In 1842 they removed to Tennessee, remaining there until 1850, then went to Smith county, Texas. In 1871 the father died, and in 1879, the mother passed away at Eugene, Oregon. Our subject was educated in the public schools of the various sections where he lived, and in 1868 went to New Orleans and attended the medical college at that place. In 1872, he migrated to Oregon and entered the medical department of the...

Read More

Biography of Edwin F. Guyon, M. D.

Edwin F. Guyon, M. D., who has become known as county physician of Bear Lake county, Idaho, assistant surgeon for the Oregon Short Line, member of Idaho and Oregon State Medical Associations and of the American National Medical Association, and as author of the law to prohibit illegal medical practice in Idaho and coauthor with Dr. C. J. Smith of the law to prevent illegal medical practice in Oregon, is one of the leading physicians in Idaho and is doing much to elevate his profession and augment its usefulness throughout the northwest. Dr. Guyon began the practice of medicine in Pendleton City, Oregon, in 1891, and continued it there successfully for five years, when his health began to fail and he sought a higher altitude and a dryer atmosphere at Montpelier. The colder climate agreed with him, and he regained his health, and by the time he had done so he had built up a large and rapidly growing practice, in which he has been successful professionally as well as financially. Dr. Guyon was born at New Orleans, Louisiana, November 7, 1853, of Huguenot ancestors, on his father’s side, who came early in our history from France and settled in New York and New Jersey. John Guyon, his father, was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, and married Miss Emily Shattuck, a native of St. Louis, but a descendant...

Read More

Biography of Samuel R. Parkinson

The name of this gentleman is so inseparably connected with the history of Franklin, its up-building and its progress along commercial, educational and church lines, that no history of the southeastern section of the state would be complete without the record of his useful career. He was one of the first to locate in Franklin and is numbered among its honored pioneers. A native of England, he was born in Barrowford, Lancastershire, April 12, 1831, a son of William and Charlotte (Rose) Parkinson, who were likewise natives of that country. He was only six months old when his father died, and two years later his mother married Edward Berry, a gentleman who was very fond of travel and who took his wife and stepson to many foreign ports, including the Cape of Good Hope, Africa, thence to Sydney, Australia, to New Zealand, to Valparaiso, in South America, and then back to England in the fall of 1846. They were shipwrecked in the Irish channel, were rescued in lifeboats, and were landed in Ireland at the time of the severe famine in that country. Mr. Parkinson’s stepfather expended nearly all his means in relieving the distress of his relatives in that country, and in the spring of 1848 he sailed with his family for New Orleans and thence to St. Louis, where our subject first heard the teachings of the...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Ernest M. Post

Post, Ernest M.; insurance; born, Avoca, Louisiana, Sept. 1, 1862; son of Ralph B. and Ellen Deming Post; educated, Norwalk, Conn., and Hanover, Va.: married, Milwaukee, Wis., March 27, 1894, Alice C. Paine; 1882 to 1892, connected with the firm of R. B. Post & Son, wholesale grocers, New Orleans; in 1892, entered the employ of The Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York, in New Orleans; was transferred to Milwaukee, Wis., in 1893; in 1903, was made mgr. of the company for the territory of Northern Michigan and Northern Wisconsin; the following year, was put in charge of the company’s interests in Indiana, with headquarters in Indianapolis; was appointed mgr. for Northwestern Ohio, in 1907; member Euclid, and Athletic Clubs, and Chamber of...

Read More

Biography of Hiram C. Whitley

Hiram C. Whitley. The State of Kansas is filled with interesting men, many of them known to the world at large. The city of Emporia had several. One is a prominent business man, who for upwards of forty years had given his time and energies to the upbuilding of that locality. This is Hiram C. Whitley who was at one time chief of the secret service division of the United States Treasury. The story of his life, particularly the early years, reads like a book, and in fact his experiences have been described in a book which was published about twenty years ago and which throws an interesting light on life and times in the far South during the Civil war period and also that era known as the reconstruction period for ten years following the great Civil war. Mr. Whitley wrote this book under the title “In It” and it is somewhat in the nature of an autobiography, told simply and modestly, but illuminating that historic epoch in our nation’s history with which it deals. The author says: “The incidents related in this book are founded principally on facts, as they came to me during an experience of twelve years in the Secret Service of the United States Government.” Hiram C. Whitley is a native of the Pine Tree State, but his experiences have covered a larger part...

Read More

Biography of Ira B. Oldham, M. D.

Dr. Ira B. Oldham, who for eighteen years has engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Muskogee and whose ability and wide knowledge lie behind the substantial success that he has achieved, was born on a farm in Madison county, Kentucky, March 2, 1871, his parents being William Kavanaugh and J. Catherine (Brown) Oldham, both of whom were representatives of old southern families early established in Virginia. Dr. Oldham’s father was born in Madison county, Kentucky, but his grandfather, Hezekiah Oldham, was born in Caswell county, North Carolina, and was a son of Captain John Oldham, an American soldier of the Revolutionary war and a son of William Oldham, founder of the family in America; having come from England to the new world in early colonial days. The birth of J. Catherine (Brown) Oldham occurred in Albemarle county, Virginia, and by her marriage she became the mother of nine children, three of whom are still living. The parents continued their residence in Kentucky until called to their final rest. Dr. Oldham was reared upon the homestead farm and supplemented his public school training by a course of study in Central University at Richmond, Kentucky. Later he decided upon the practice of medicine as a life work and entered the University of Louisville, from which institution he was graduated on the completion of a medical course as a...

Read More

Biography of Peter Taschetta

Peter Taschetta. One of the early permanent settlers of Leavenworth was Peter Taschetta, a native of Switzerland, born in Canton, January 6, 1822. He was of Italian ancestry, but long before his birth his people, living on the border between Italy and Switzerland, had property in the former country and his parents became Swiss subjects by purchase. The father was interested in stained glass manufacturing and, as a contractor, traveled extensively, particularly in France, overseeing the placing of stained glass in cathedrals and other structures, some of these being rare examples of artistic coloring. He employed a large number of men to do the work and, as his son Peter grew to years of responsibility, he became timekeeper and also financial agent for his father. In such capacity he visited different countries, necessarily learning their language and before he came to America not only spoke four languages fluently, but also wrote them. Peter Taschetta continued this life of constant travel in Europe until he was twenty-seven years old, it possibly having its influence in leading him to consider visiting America, a far-distant land in those days of slow-sailing vessels. In 1849 he landed at New Orleans, Louisiana, and from there journeyed up the Mississippi to St. Louis. In that city he engaged in mercantile pursuits for a time, but had not yet had the spirit of wanderlust been extinguished,...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of A. B. Conley

A. B. Conley, merchant, and a prominent citizen of Tullahoma, Tennessee, was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee, November 7, 1847; the son of A. W. Conley, a native of Tennessee. Our subject was reared on a farm in what is now a part of Crockett County. He acquired his education in the common schools and in 1867 began the study of medicine. He attended the Eclectic College at Cincinnati, Ohio, the medical department of the University of Louisiana at New Orleans, and graduated in 1884 from the American Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati. From 1871 to 1880 he practiced in Louisiana and then went to Milan, Tennessee. June 17, 1886, he came to Tullahoma and engaged in general merchandising, his present occupation. At the age of fourteen he ran away from home, joined the Confederate Twelfth Tennessee Cavalry. After a year’s service he returned home on account of sickness. He was married in 1869 to Mattie J., daughter of Washington Mitchell of Rutherford County, Tennessee. Three children were born to them, one girl and two boys; our subject is a member of the Masonic, Odd Fellows, K. of P., K. of H., K. & L. of H. and A. O. U. W....

Read More

Curtis E. Blake

Water Ten. (Navy), 1st Div.; of New Orleans, La.; son of W. H. and Mrs. Eliza Blake. Entered service March 24, 1912, at Frisco, Cal.; re-enlisted March 3, 1917, at Norfolk, Va. Wounded at Chateau Thierry by machine gun. Sent to U. S. Mercy Hospital Ship. Served on Paulding, foreign duty as guard, also U. S. S. Virginian, U. S. S. Idaho, made several convoy trips, made five transport trips. Was fired on by submarine twice on board Paulding. Served in Honolulu four months guard duty; was in battle of Chateau Thierry and Bellicourt, served on Mexican border from March 29, 1916, to March 1, 1917. Mustered out at San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 16,...

Read More

Wilmer Lewis Todd of New Orleans LA

Wilmer Lewis Todd10, (Wilmer L.9, Henry8, Ezra L.7, Ezra L.6, James5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Nov. 27, 1879, in New Orleans, La., and there he married Oct. 9, 1906, Anna Albertine Vitter. Children: 2820. Audrey, b. Aug. 11, 1907, d. March 8, 1909. 2821. Lewis Junior, b. Nov. 8, 1913. 2822. Audeth Anna, b. July 3,...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest