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Location: New London County CT

Pequot Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Pequot Indians (contr. of Paquatauog, ‘destroyers.’- Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe of Connecticut. Before their conquest by the English in 1637 they were the most dreaded of the southern New England tribes. They were originally but one people with the Mohegan, and it is possible that the term Pequot was unknown until applied by the eastern coast Indians to this body of Mohegan invaders, who came down from the interior shortly before the arrival of the English. The division into two distinct tribes seems to have been accomplished by the secession of Uncas, who, in consequence of a dispute with Sassacus, afterward known as the great chief of the Pequot, withdrew into the interior with a small body of followers. This body retained the name of Mohegan, and through the diplomatic management of Uncas acquired such prominence that on the close of the Pequot War their claim to the greater part of the territory formerly subject to Sassacus was recognized by the colonial government. The real territory of the Pequot was a narrow strip of coast in New London County, extending from Niantic River to the Rhode Island boundary, comprising the present towns of New London, Groton, and Stonington. They also extended a few miles into Rhode Island to Wecapaug River until driven out by the Narraganset...

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Mohegan Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Mohegan Indians (from ma├»ngan, ‘wolf.’ Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe whose chief seat appears originally to have been on Thames river, Conn., in the north part of New London county. They claimed as their proper country all the territory watered by the Thames and its branches north to within 8 or 10 miles of the Massachusetts line, and by conquest a considerable area extending north and east into Massachusetts and Rhode Island, occupied by the Wabaquasset and Nipmuc. On the west their dominion extended along the coast to East river, near Guilford, Conn. After the destruction of the Pequot in 1637 the Mohegan laid claim to their country and that of the western Nehantic in the south part of New London county. The tribes west of them on Connecticut river, whom they sometimes claimed as subjects, were generally hostile to them, as were also the Narraganset on their east border. The Mohegan seem to have been the eastern branch of that group of closely connected tribes that spread from the vicinity of Narragansett bay to the farther side of the Hudson, but since known to the whites the eastern and western bodies have had no political connection. At the first settlement of New England the Mohegan and Pequot formed but one tribe, under the rule of Sassacus,...

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The Defense of Stonington, Connecticut

Accounts the attack and defense of Stonington Connecticut during the War of 1812. Included will be found a muster-roll of the Borough company of militia, the official account furnished for publication by the magistrates, warden and burgesses; and a letter from Capt. Amos Palmer, chairman of the citizens’ committee of defense, to Mr. Crawford, secretary of war, containing a concise narrative of the action.

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New London County, Connecticut Census

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now 1790 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1790 New London County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1790 U.S. Census Guide 1800 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1800 New London County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1810 New London County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1820 New London County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1830 New London County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 New London County, Connecticut Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com...

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New London County, Connecticut Cemetery Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. The following cemeteries are hosted by Connecticut Tombstone Transcription Project Old Church Cemetery Union Cemetery Cedar Grove Cemetery Chipman-Fish Cemetery Gallup Cemetery Following pages hosted at New London County USGenWeb Project) Hough-Harris Cemetery Old Burying Ground Ponemah Cemetery Exeter Cemetery Trumbull Cemetery Allen-Satterlee Cemetery Levi Chapman Cemetery Bailey Cemetery Nathaniel Bellows Cemetery Fanning Cemetery Ledyard Center Pleasant View Cemetery Selden Cemetery (Hadlyme) Cedar Grove Cemetery (Info Only) Beebee Cemetery North Stonington Cemeteries Norwich Cemeteries Guile Cemetery Haskell Cemetery Small Pox and Indian Cemetery Safford Cemetery Brown Cemetery Old Poquetanock Fobes-Amos Cemetery Davis Cemetery Gore Cemetery Crary Cemetery Long Society Cemetery Palmer Cemetery Brewster Cemetery Killam Cemetery Bentley-Sholes Lathrop Cemetery Fox Cemetery Cockle Hill Cemetery Harris Cemetery Wesley Brown Cemetery Ancient Burial Ground (older graves) Gallup Cemetery Kennedy Cemetery Old Kinne Cemetery Old Church Cemetery Union Cemetery- Quaker Hill Mullin Hill Cemetery Following pages hosted at Interment) Exeter Cemetery (partial) Trumbull Cemetery (partial)...

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Biographical Sketch of Christopher Avery

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Christopher Avery, the founder of this family, was born in England, about 1590, and died in New London, Connecticut, March 12, 1679. There are several traditions as to his place of origin, one that he came from an old Cornish family, another that he was a native of Salisbury, county Wilts. According to one statement, he accompanied Governor Winthrop to Boston, on the “Arbella” in 1630, and a second account says he emigrated with the younger Winthrop, in 1631 and on the voyage formed a close friendship with the latter, which eventually led to his settling in Connecticut. Whether, as has been said, he spent several years at first in Boston is uncertain, but he was in Gloucester about 1644, and was selectman there 1646, 1652 and 1654. He was made freeman at Salem June 29, 1652, and was also clerk of the band, constable, and clerk of the market there. In 1658 be sold his Gloucester land and removed to Boston, where he purchased, March 18, 1658-59 a house and lot. This he sold again a few years later, and followed his son to New London, where he bought property August 8, 1665, and finally settled. His wife, and possibly his children with the exception of his son James, referred to below, did not come...

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Biographical Sketch of James Avery

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (II) James, son of Christopher Avery. the only child of whom there is any record in America, and the founder of the Averys of Groton, was born in England about 1620. He accompanied his father to the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and lived with him for several years in Gloucester, and then removed to New London, Connecticut, where the first entries in the town book are the births of his three eldest children, who were born in Gloucester. He took up many land grants and built the Hive of the Averys “at the head of Poquonnock Plain in the present town of Groton, about one and one-half miles from the River Thames.” He was a prominent public character, was ensign, lieutenant and captain of the train band, deputy to the general court. Indian commissioner and agent, and townsman from 1660 for twenty years. He married, November 10, 1643, Joanna Greenslade, of Boston. Children : 1. Hannah, born October 12, 1644, married, June 20, 1666, Ephraim Miner. 2. James, born December 16, 1646, died August 22, 1748: married, February 18, 1669, Deborah Stallyou. 3. Mary, born February 19, 1648, died February 2, 1708, married, October 28, 1668, Joseph Miner. 4. Thomas, born May 6, 1651: died January 5, 1737; married, October 22, 1677, Hannah Miner. 5. John, born...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel Avery

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (III) Samuel, son of James and Joanna (Greenslade) Avery, was born at Groton, August 14, 1664, died there, May 1, 1723. He was a large farm owner and most of his life a magistrate. For some time he was captain of the train band, and when the town was legally organized in 1704, he was its moderator. He became the first townsman, at the first town meeting in 1705, and held the position till his death. He married, October 25, 1686, in Swansea, Massachusetts, Susanna, daughter of William and Ann (Humphrey) Palmes, born about 1665, died October 9, 1747. Children: 1. Samuel, born August it, 1687, died August 7, 1714. 2. Jonathan, born January 18, 1689, died June 12, 1761; married Preserved . 3. William, born August 25, 1692, died February 20, 1718. 4. Mary, born January 10, 1695, died in May, 1739 married, June 16, 1720, William Walsworth. 5. Christopher, born February 10, 1697, died January 17, 1768; married, June 25, 1719, Mary Latham. 6. Humphrey, referred to below. 7. Nathan, born January 30, 1702, married Mary . 8. Lucy, born April 17, 1703. John, born September 17, 1705, died September 9, 1792, married Bridget Higgins. 10. Waitstill, born March 27, 1708, married (first), September 18, 1729, Deborah Williams and (second) Margaret Childs. 11. Grace,...

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Biographical Sketch of Ensign John Rowley

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Ensign John Rowley, son of Moses (2) Rowley, was born about 1690 in Falmouth, Massachusetts, died in January, 1763, in Colchester, Connecticut. He married (first) September 11, 1716, Deborah, daughter of John and Mehitable (Rowley) Fuller, of East Haddam, Connecticut. She died January 30, 1752, aged sixty-three. He had a second wife. He removed to East Haddam about 1722 and afterward to Colchester. He was a member of the Westchester parish church in Colchester. Children of first wife: Patience, born August 30. 1717: Content, March 26, 1719; Mindwell, October 9, 1720; Joseph. May i5, 1721; Sarah, January 17, 1722-23; Deborah, December 14, 1725: John, mentioned elsewhere; Seth, May 6,...

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Biography of Kinney, Asa, Hon.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Kinney, Asa Hon. The parents of Mr. Kinney were Abel and Freelove Kinney, of Cortland County, N Y.; their place of nativity being New London, Conn. They were among the early settlers of Cortland County, N. Y., and the father was a man of influence and prominence. His grandparents were of revolutionary stock, having served their country in the struggle for liberty. Asa Kinney was the fourth son of the family, and was born at Homer, Cortland County, N. Y., May 21, 1810. He received a common school education; was also noted as a debater when a young man. He resided in Homer, N. Y., Preston City, Conn., and Cattaraugus County, N. Y. Previous to coming West, he went to Milwaukee, Wis., in 1836, and settled at Oak Creek on the 5th of July of the same year, where he followed farming. Previous to coming West he had been identified with several town offices, and was promoted Lieutenant Colonel of his regiment in New York. He was one of the first Justices of the Peace in Milwaukee County; was a member of the last Territorial Legislature of Wisconsin, and he was elected as a Representative from Milwaukee County to the Constitutional Convention of 1846, and served on the committee on the organization and affairs of counties...

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Biographical Sketch of Ezra Durand

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Ezra Durand was born in Seneca Falls, New York, on March 8, 1833, and is the youngest of a family of thirteen sons and daughters of David and Betsey (Crowell), Durand. His father was a farmer and his early boyhood was passed on a farm. His opportunities for gaining an education were limited to a few winters at the district school. At an early age he left home and went to Worcester, Massachusetts, where he obtained employment in a musical instrument factory. This was followed by similar work in a factory at Norwich, Connecticut. He seemed to have a natural taste for the business, making rapid progress in a thorough knowledge of every branch. At the end of a few years he secured a situation with a Boston firm and traveled all through the New England States, tuning pianos and doing such other work in connection with musical instruments as the nature of their business required. In later years he was traveling salesman for the well known organ manufactory of Estey & Co., of Battleboro, Vermont. In 1881, Mr. Durand came to the Pacific Coast, and for a few months was located in San Francisco, California, but in. 1882, came to Portland. He soon after embarked in the piano and organ business and from the very...

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