Location: New London County CT

Biographical Sketch of Capt. William Newton

Capt. William Newton was born in Colchester, Conn., Oct. 15, 1786. His father, Asahel Newton, had served several years in the army of the Revolution. He was in straitened circumstances and had a large family of children, of whom William was the oldest, and on him devolved a large share of the burden of supporting his brothers and sisters. Having learned the trade of a clothier he came to Sherburne in 1806 and worked with Landon & Mills at Bullocks Mills. He took a factory in New Berlin in 1807, and went to Camden, N. Y., and worked in 1809. Aug. 22, 1810, he married Lois Butler, a native of Wethersfield, Conn., who still survives him and is living in Sherburne with mental faculties unimpaired. Mr. Newton moved his family to Sherburne May 11, 1812, and resided here from that time till his death, which occurred August 13, 1879, at the age of 92 years. He bought twenty acres of land and in 1812 built the house now occupied by Jacob Kuhn, and near it a woolen factory, on the bank of Handsome brook, which was ready for cloth dressing in the fall of that year. The factory was burned in 1822 and rebuilt in 1823. It was again burned in the winter of 1826-7 and was not rebuilt. The house in which he resided at the time of...

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Biography of M. B. Clarke

M. B. CLARKE. M. B. Clarke, cashier of the West Plains Bank, is one of the capable and practical business men of the place and his name is synonymous for integrity and good judgment. The bank, of which he is the most efficient cashier, was incorporated in 1883 with a capital stock of $15,000, and the officers were: B. F. Olden, president, and Joseph L. Thomas, cashier. The capital stock in 1890 was increased to $50,000 and the present officers elected. In 1889 Mr. M. B. Clarke was elected cashier, and after serving two years again took the position March 1, 1883. The other officers are: Judge Olden, president, and R. S. Hogan, vice-president. The bank is doing a general business and the average deposit is $120,000. The stockholders are residents of the county and are among the wide-awake, thoroughgoing men of the same. The building is owned by the bank officials and was erected at a cost of $5,000. This bank has probably been one of the best managed of any in the State, always having a cash reserve of at least 50 per cent of the deposits, and it holds the confidence of the entire public. Mr. Clarke is a native of New London County, Conn., born November 12, 1857, and the son of B. F. Clarke, who was a sea captain. The father was born in...

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Biographical Sketch of Capt. Henry E. Morgan

CAPT. HENRY E. MORGAN. – This well-known pioneer of 1849 is a native of Groton, Connecticut, and was born October 30, 1825. He moved with his parents to Meriden, in the same state, residing there until April, 1849, when he set forth for California in a bark via Cape Horn, arriving in San Francisco the following September. A short time afterwards he began a sea-faring life, and for fifteen years sailed the ocean. During that time he entered nearly all the noted foreign ports, and later purchased a vessel of his own and followed a coasting trade. In 1858 he located in Port Townsend, Washington territory, and after quitting the sea began to till the soil, and followed farming for six years. In 1863 he was elected representative from Jefferson county, and ably filled that office for two terms. In 1879 he was appointed inspector of hulls for the Puget sound district. He has invested from time to time in real estate in Port Townsend, and is now one of the largest property owners of the city, and after the buffetings of many years is safely anchored in a happy home, esteemed by his acquaintances and honored by the citizens of the town in which he lives. His family consists of a wife and one...

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Biographical Sketch of James D. Sullivan

James D. Sullivan is proprietor of the Art Store at 122-124 West Eighth Street and 728-730 Jackson Street in Topeka. During his residence in Topeka he has developed a large business, and this is due to his thorough training in the profession and his own sense of artistic values which have enabled him to render a valuable service to his large patronage. James D. Sullivan was born in Norwich, Connecticut, January 11, 1861, a son of James and Mary (Bridgeman) Sullivan. He received a public school education, and also took a business course in a business college at Chicago. His best training for his profession came at Chicago, where he was long in the employ of the W. Scott Thurber Art Gallery as a foreman, these galleries having a wide reputation over the Central West not only as dealers in some of the most notable art works of the world, but also as creative artists and decorators. He spent about nineteen years in the Thurber galleries and for three years was with the firm of Bowen & Lee in the same line. In November, 1897, Mr. Sullivan came to Topeka and has directed his business as an art dealer and restorer of painting, and has always made artistic framing a specialty. One painting which Mr. Sullivan restored in which he takes the greatest pride is the painting of “The...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry Eldridge Bourne

Bourne, Henry Eldridge; college professor; born, E. Hamburg, N. Y., April 13, 1862; son of James R. and Isabella G. Staples Bourne; A. B., Yale University, 1883, B. D. 1887 (Hooker fellow, 1887-1888); (L. H. D., Marietta College, Ohio, 1910); married; associate editor The Congregationalist, Boston, 1888-1889; teacher history and psychology, Norwich (Conn.), Free Academy, 1889-1892; prof. history, since 1892; registrar, 1893-1901; College for Women, Western Reserve University. Author: The Teaching of History and Civics, 1902; Medieval and Modern History, 1905. Editor: Lecky’s French Revolution, 1904. Contributor to...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Henry Geer

Geer, Thomas Henry; general insurance; born, Ledyard, Conn., Sept. 3, 1840; son of Nathaniela Bellows and Julia Davis Geer; educated, common schools, Ledyard, Conn.; 1854, Irving Institute, Tarrytown, N. Y.; 1857, State Normal School, Westfield, Mass.; graduate, 1861-1862, Norwich Academy, Norwich, Conn.; married, Poquetanuck, Conn., June 30, 1868, Fanny Halsey Brewster; one daughter, Mary Brewster Geer; Republican in polities; 1859, teacher Grammar School, West Gloucester, Mass.; 1860, principal of High School, Rockport, Mass., 1862-1865, teacher Burlington College, Burlington, N. J., 1866 to date, general insurance business, Cleveland; pres. The Thomas H. Geer Co.; sec’y The Triton Steamship Co.; sec ‘y and pres. Cleveland Life Underwriter’s Ass’n; sec’y Life Underwriter’s Ass’n of Ohio; treas., vice pres. and pres. Cleveland Board of Underwriters; Pres. National Ass’n of Local Fire Insurance Agents; director The Cleveland Humane Society; vestryman Trinity Cathedral; member Athletic...

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Biography of Willis G. Weaver

Willis G. Weaver, former clerk of the District Court of Wabaunsee County, had for many years been engaged in the abstract, real estate, loan and insurance business at Alma. He is one of the most widely known men in the county. Mr. Weaver was born at New London, Connecticut, January 7, 1864, but had lived in this part of Kansas since he was a small child. The Weaver family were identified with New England from the earliest period of settlement. It is said that they came out of England and settled in Massachusetts in 1636. Mr. Weaver’s father was the late Dr. Lathrop P. Weaver, the first physician to locate and carry on a regular practice at the Town of Wabaunsee. He was born at Enfield, Connecticut, in 1823, grew up and married there, entered his profession as a physician and surgeon, and during the war he offered his services to Governor Buckingham of Connecticut as a surgeon but was never called out for duty. In April, 1868, he came to Wabaunsee, Kansas, and handled a large practice there until his death in 1874. He also filled the office of postmaster and was a justice of the peace. In politics he was a republican and was an active supporter of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Doctor Weaver married Amy A. Kinne, who was born at Voluntown, Connecticut, in 1827, and...

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Martha Collins Todd Hill

HILL, Martha Collins Todd7, (John6, Timothy5, Timothy4, Jonathan3, John2, Christopher1) born April 1, 1831, marricd March 11, 1857, Rev. Charles Jenkins Hill, who graduated from Williams College, and Andover Theological Seminary. He was a congregational clergyman and held pastorates at Nashua, N. H., Whiteall and Gloversville, N. Y., Ansonia, Middletown and Stonington, Conn. Children: I. Annie Williams, b. March 23, 1858, m. (???) Harper. II. John Todd, b. April 16, 1863, m. Grace(???). III. Miriam, b. Oct. 23,...

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Biography of Otis T. Dyer

No historical work claiming to he a true record of the growth and prosperity of Riverside for the decade of years preceding 1890, and claiming to record the establishment of many enterprises, industries and incorporations that have been the leading factor in placing her in the ranks of the leading cities and colonies of Southern California, could be considered as anything but glaringly incomplete without a more than passing mention of the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. His association and connection with Riverside’s leading enterprises form an interesting chapter in the annals of the city and county. Mr. Dyer’s life, since Riverside received its first impetus, has been closely interwoven with every important enterprise or movement that tended to benefit the city and add to the welfare and prosperity of the community. The few facts obtained relating to his life and successful career are of interest. He was born in Portage, Genesee County, New York, in 1844. His parents were Leman W. and Philena (Green) Dyer. His father was a native of the Green Mountain State, and was a mechanic, a marble and granite worker by calling. When the subject of this sketch was four years of age his father moved to New London, Connecticut, and it was there where young Dyer received his early education, in the public schools. In the winter of 1857-’58, his father becoming...

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Biographical Sketch of John Rowlee Fausey

JOHN ROWLEE FAUSEY – To the general advancement of the interests of the public schools of Massachusetts, and particularly of Springfield and West Springfield, Mr. Fausey has devoted the larger part of his career as a teacher and superintendent, and with results that are recorded as having enlarged the bounds and increased the value of the educational institutions in those communities where he has taught and held official position. John Rowlee Fausey, son of James Seldon and Caroline Helen (Blauvelt) Fausey, was born March 19, 1870, in Elmira, New York, where he attended the public school, and he afterwards graduated at Genessee Wesleyan Seminary at Lima, New York, in the class of 1893, In 1893-1895 and 1896-1897, he was a student at Syracuse University, where he later received his degree of Bachelor of Arts. Mr. Fausey at once entered upon his career as an educator, and during 1898-1899 he was both teacher and principal at Galeton, Pennsylvania; at Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1899-1902; and at Norwich, Connecticut, in 1902-1905. Mr. Fausey went to Springfield as principal of the Howard Street School of that city in 1906, and he continued in that position until 1912, when he went to West Springfield as superintendent, so continuing to 1918. From 1918 to 1923, he served as superintendent at Winchester, Massachusetts. In 1923 he was recalled to the West Springfield superintendency, which he has...

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Biography of Israel Newton

ISRAEL NEWTON-The Newton family of Orange is one of the oldest New England families on record, the first American ancestor of whom we have positive knowledge having come to the shores of New England in the early autumn of 1639. He was one of the four men who came with Roger Ludlow, deputy governor, who had obtained a commission from the General Court of Connecticut to begin a plantation at Poquonock. Thomas Newton moved to Newton, Long Island, in 1636, and in 1645 was chosen as representative from Fairfield to the General Court. Deacon Israel and Lois T. Newton had an only son Asa, who reached the age of manhood, and on January 23, 1777, married Lydia Worthington, a daughter of Colonel Elias Worthington, of the same town, who was born October 22, 1760. They were the parents of nine children: 1. Elias W., born November 16, 1780. 2. Asa, born October 3, 1782. 3. Rhoda, born January 28, 1785. 4 Lydia, born January 21, 1788. 5. Sally, born April 2, 1791. 6. Israel, of whom further. 7. Louisa, born January 23, 1796. 8. Joel W., born May 29, 1799. 9. Laura M., born February 15, 1802. Israel Newton, born February 11, 1794, was a farmer and a deacon of the Congregational Church for fifty years. He was a native of Colchester, Connecticut, where he died. On January 14,...

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Biographical Sketch of James T. Brown

JAMES T. BROWN, manager of the Hotel Worthy, Springfield, Massachusetts, was born in Luzeme, New York, February 24, 1885. His father was William E. Brown, and his mother Jennie I. (Taylor) Brown. The father was engaged in the mill business at Norwich, and also conducted a tannery. The family removed from the New York village where the early years of Mr. Brown were passed, to Norwich, Connecticut, when he was twelve years old. There the boy attended the public schools. He completed his studies to become a hotel employe, and his chosen occupation he has followed steadily through life. After many successful ventures he became manager of the Hotel Worthy, Springfield, in 1922, and has continued in that capacity ever since. He is also manager and director of the Worthy Inn, at Manchester, Vermont, a place he has filled since 1919. In October, 1924, Mr. Brown became the lessee of the Hotel Draper, at Northampton, Massachusetts, adding that noted resort to his other properties. Mr. Brown is a member of the Oxford Country Club; and of the Masonic Club. His fraternal affiliations are with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Masonic fraternity, in which he has received the thirty-second degree, Scottish Rite. He is a member of Melha Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and of Bela Grotto, Springfield, Massachusetts. Mr. Brown married, in...

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Biography of William L. Learned

WILLIAM L. LEARNED AN ALBANY jurist whose long and interesting career has reflected no little credit upon himself as well as upon the city of his adoption, is the Hon. William Law Learned, of the supreme court. He was born on the 24th of July, 1821, at New London, Connecticut, and is the son of Ebenezer Learned and Lydia Coit, his second wife. His ancestry is of English origin. His ancestors emigrated to this country at an early day, and settled in Charlestown, Mass. The first admission to the First church of Charlestown was that of his ancestor, William Learned, in 1632. Both his grandfathers, Amasa Learned and Joshua Coit, were men of excellent character, learning and ability in their day; and both of them were members of congress about the beginning of the present century. The father of the present judge was for many years a practicing lawyer, and later in life became a cashier in one of the state banks of Connecticut. He was a man of sound and excellent judgment, and of the purest integrity. At an early age he was graduated from Yale College, and after teaching school for a few years he entered in the practice of his profession at New London. In the pleasant town of New London, William L. Learned spent his earliest years, under the careful and tender instruction of intelligent...

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Western Niantic Tribe

Western Niantic Indians. An Algonquian tribe formerly occupying the coast of Connecticut from Niantic bay to the Connecticut river. De Forest concluded that they once formed one tribe with the Rhode Island Niantic, which was cut in two by the Pequot invasion. Their principal village, also called Niantic, was near the present town of that name. They were subject to the Pequot, and had no political connection with the eastern Niantic. They were nearly destroyed in the Pequot war of 1637, and at its close the survivors were placed under the rule of the Mohegan. They numbered about 100 in 1638, and about 85 in 1761. Many joined the Brotherton Indians in New York about 1788, and none now exist under their own name. Kendall 1Kendall, Tray., 1809 states that they had a small village near Danbury in 1809, but these were probably a remnant of the western Connecticut tribes, not Niantic. According to Speck 2Speck, inf’n, 1907 several mixed Niantic Mohegan live at Mohegan, Connecticut, the descendants of a pure Niantic woman from the mouth of Niantic river. Their voices are commonly said to have been high-pitched in comparison with those of their neighbors. Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Kendall, Tray., 1809 2. ↩ Speck, inf’n,...

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