Location: New Haven County CT

Ancestors of John Richardson Bronson of Attleboro, MA

JOHN RICHARDSON BRONSON, M. D., who for over half a century was one of the best known practitioners of medicine in southern Massachusetts and part of Rhode Island, and who for upward of fifty years was a resident of Attleboro, was a native of Connecticut, born in the town of Middlebury, New Haven county, June 5, 1829, son of Garry and Maria (Richardson) Bronson.

The Bronson family was early planted in the New World. John Bronson (early of record as Brownson and Brunson) was early at Hartford. He is believed, though not certainly known, to have been one of the company who came in 1636 with Mr. Hooker, of whose church he was a member. He was a soldier in the Pequot battle of 1637. He is not named among the proprietors of Hartford in the land division of 1639; but is mentioned in the same year in the list of settlers, who by the “towne’s courtesie” had liberty “to fetch woods and keepe swine or cowes on the common.” His house lot was in the “soldiers’ field,” so called, in the north part of the old village of Hartford, on the “Neck Road” (supposed to have been given for service in the Pequot war), where he lived in 1640. He moved, about 1641 to Tunxis (Farmington) He was deputy from Farmington in May, 1651, and at several subsequent sessions, and the “constable of Farmington” in 1652. He was one of the seven pillars at the organization of the Farmington Church in 1652. His name is on the list of freemen of Farmington in 1669. He died Nov. 28, 1680.

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Hubbard Genealogy

George Hubbard George1 Hubbard was first in Watertown, Mass., about 1633; m. Mary Bishop, who d. at Guilford, Conn., Sept. 14, 1675. She was dau. of John and Ann Bishop, who moved to Guilford in 1639, where he, Bishop, was one of the seven prop. of the town, and d. there, February, 1661. On May 6, 1635, permission from the General Court of Massachusetts was granted to the inhabitants of Watertown “to remove themselves to any place they shall think meet to make choice of, provided they still continue under the government.” Among these immigrators was George Hubbard and family and his father-in-law, John Bishop and family. George Hubbard was the representative of Wethersfield, Conn., at the first Colonial General Court, under the Constitution of 1639. He went from Wethersfield and settled at Milford on Long Island, “being assigned Milford Island as his grant. He was one of those persons whose names are hereunto written-who are allowed to be free planters, having for the present, liberty to act in the choice of public officers for the carrying on of public affairs in this plantation. Mr. George Hubbard came from Wethersfield.” Before 1650 he sold Milford Island to Richard Bryan, and moved with his son-in-law John Fowler to Guilford, where his wife’s parents, John and Ann Bishop, had become residents. George Hubbard was admitted to church membership in Guilford, Oct. 6,...

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Biography of Marion Francis Mulkey

MARION FRANCIS MULKEY.- This gentleman, the eldest son of Johnson Mulkey, and who took up, and conducted in the spirit, and to some extent in the method, the pioneer activities of his father, was born in Johnson county, Missouri, November 14, 1836. He was therefore but a boy of ten when, in 1847, he accompanied his father across the continent to Oregon. His, however, was one of those old heads on young shoulders; and so responsible was he, and so capable of affairs, that he was intrusted with the driving of oxen, and all work adapted to his strength, with the same confidence as a grown man. Upon arriving in Oregon and beginning life anew on the Donation claim in Benton county, he played his part in felling timber, breaking and fencing land, and erecting the frontiersman’s temporary buildings as vigorously as anyone in the family. He early drew from his parents a desire for education, and after his first essays in learning at the log schoolhouse, under the tuition of such men as Senator J.H. Slater, and Honorable Philip Ritz, was eager to take advantage of the assistance furnished by his father to pursue higher studies at Forest Grove, under the guidance of the late Doctor S.H. Marsh. This assistance he supplemented by labor of his own, following the traditional method of the youth ambitious of self-improvement, -teaching...

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Biograhy of Dennis Heartt

If history consists of the lives of great men, whose names are “wrought into the verbs of language, their works and effigies in our houses,” North Carolina should contribute many pages to the epitome of civilization; for her institutions, public and private, have been established by men of superior abilities, who have spared neither time nor resources in the founding of a great State. In journalism, as in economic and political growth, the pioneer work has been done by men of strong personal character, who possessed the art of citizenship as well as the talents requisite for their chosen work. These editors, though the remains of their labor often seem eccentric when compared with our modern journals, had great influence among the people, and their memories are forever perpetuated in the ideals of the State they served so well. Among these pioneers of our press none were purer in public and private life, more energetic, or held greater favor throughout the State than Dennis Heartt, the founder, and for nearly fifty years the editor, of the Hillsborough Recorder. Like many of our best citizens, Mr. Heartt was not a native Carolinian. His father was an English sea captain, who settled in New England. Here, in the village of North Bradford, Connecticut, November 6, 1783, Dennis Heartt was born. Very little is known of the young man’s early life. In...

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Center Street Cemetery, Wallingford, Connecticut

JONATHAN DICKERMAN b. 1775, d. 1831, aged 56 yrs. AMOS RICE d. July 23, 1794, aged 60 yrs. ELIZABETH, wife of Thomas Rice, d. June 5, 1833, aged 82 yrs. MERAT RICE d. Sept. 10, 1807, aged 32 yrs. CAPT. MOSES RICE b. 1715, d. 1799, aged 84 yrs. PULLMAN RICE d. Nov. 3, 1817, aged 78 yrs. THANKFUL, wife of Capt. Moses Rice, d. 1784, aged 70 yrs. THOMAS RICE d. Feby. 8, 1828, aged 79...

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Biographical Sketch of George Marshall Crawford

George Marshall Crawford, the only son of Governor Crawford, was born at Emporia, Kansas, July 10, 1872, and for a number of years has been a prominent newspaper man and publisher at Topeka. His education came from the public schools of Topeka and the preparatory department at Washburn College, and in 1894 he graduated A. B. from Yale University. For three years he was a reporter on the Topeka Capital, but since September, 1897, has been manager of the Mail Printing Honse, in which he is a partner. Mr. Crawford is an active republican, an eighteen degree Scottish Rite Mason, a member of the Knights and Ladies of Security, the Knights of the Maccabees, the Topeka Country Club and Topeka Commercial Club. On November 6, 1895, he married Hortense Kelly, daughter of Rev. Bernard Kelly, who for many years was prominent in Kansas affairs. Mr. and Mrs. Crawford have two children: George Marshall, Jr., and...

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Biography of John Julius O’Fallon

John Julius O’Fallon is a capitalist of large interests, partly received through inheritance and since largely increased through judicious investments. He is financially interested in many important business concerns which annually yield to him a substantial revenue. He was born in St. Louis, March 6, 1840, and is a son of Colonel John and Caroline Ruth (Schutz) O’Fallon. The father figured prominently in the history of St. Louis during the first half of the nineteenth century. Viewed through the perspective of the years, it is seen that he was active in fashioning the civilization of the city during its formative period. He was born near Louisville, Kentucky, November 17, 1781, and died in St. Louis, December 17, 1865. For nearly nine hundred years the O’Fallons have figured in Irish history. The first mention of them was in the year 1017, when King Brian-Boru was killed in a battle with the Danes at Clontarf. One of the clans that fought under Brian was that of Faolan, chief of the Desie of Munster, and which was led on that occasion by Mothla, Faolan’s son. After that they were called the O’Faolans, later the Phelans, and still later the O’Fallons. In the year 1170 Malachi O’Fallon, Prince of the Desies, in connection with O’Ryan of Idrone, commanded the Irish troops at the time of the Anglo-Norman invasion. It was this Malachi O’Fallon...

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Biography of Douglas B. Houser

Douglas B. Houser, vice president of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, was born in this city August 28, 1892, and is a son of the late Daniel M. Houser. The father was born in Washington county, Maryland, December 23, 1834, and was a son of Elias and Eliza Houser. He was a youth in his fifth year at the time of his parents’ removal to Clark county, Missouri, whence they came to St. Louis in 1846. He had no educational advantages other than those afforded by the public schools and the year 1851, when he was sixteen years of age, saw him facing the problems of the business world with a career of success or failure before him, as he should make it. His first service was in a humble capacity in the workrooms of the Union, a newspaper which was merged into the Missouri Democrat upon its purchase by the firm of Hill & McKee. The history of its evolution is contained elsewhere in this volume. It is inseparably interwoven with the annals of St. Louis and its record omitted from history’s pages would leave but a garbled version of growth and development here. Marshall Field, master of finance and merchant prince, gave this advice to young men: “Try always to be ahead of your position and increase your efficiency.” Although the words were not uttered at the time...

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Biography of Benjamin H. Charles

Benjamin H. Charles, who enjoys the reputation of being one of the leading municipal bond lawyers in the United States and who in the practice of his profession is accorded an extensive clientage in St. Louis, where he makes his home, was born at Chester, Illinois, April 26, 1866, his parents being Benjamin H. and Achsah Susan (Holmes) Charles. The father was a Presbyterian minister of note who led a very active life. He was a man of positive character and high ideals and at different periods acceptably served as pastor of churches in Kentucky, Illinois and Missouri. He was graduated from Centre College at Danville, Kentucky, in 1853 and among his classmates were the late Senator Vest, Judge Phillips and Governor Crittenden of Missouri. Dr. Charles became prominent in connection with educational interests, especially in girls’ schools and was president of the Synodical College at Fulton, Missouri, from 1877 until 1888 inclusive, this being an excellent girls’ college. His last pastorate was in Trinity church at St. Louis. His wife was a daughter of the late Joseph B. Holmes, one of the early day river millers who owned two large mills at and near Chester, Illinois, the flour which he manufactured being largely for the export trade, most of it being sent to Liverpool, England. In the maternal line Mrs. Benjamin H. Charles, Senior, was a granddaughter of...

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Biography of Thomas Harper Cobbs

Thomas Harper Cobbs, lawyer and senior member of the firm of Cobbs & Logan, 1111-1116 Third National Bank building, St. Louis, Missouri, was born August 26, 1868, on a farm in Fairview township, Lafayette county, about six miles southeast of Napoleon, Missouri. His father, Thomas T. Cobbs, was a native of Tennessee. His grandfather, Thomas Cobbs, was a native of Virginia and a descendant of EnglishWelsh parents. His grandfather was among the pioneer settlers of Lafayette county, having come to that county in 1830, and having built the first gristmill in that section. After his grandfather’s death, his father operated the old water power gristmill until it became out of date and then devoted himself to farming until 1890, when he retired and moved to Marshall, Missouri, where he died in 1913. His mother, Catherine Harper Cobbs, was a native of Woodford county, Kentucky, and a member of the Harper family, one of the best known families in the “blue grass” region. They were breeders of fine horses and were the owners of “Longfellow” and “Tenbroek,” two of the most famous race horses of their day. His mother died at Marshall, Missouri, in 1910. He has one brother, William S. Cobbs, of Norborne, Missouri, and one sister, Mrs. Ethel Hyland, of Marshall, Missouri, now living and has lost two sisters, Mrs. Catherine Chinn and Mrs. Sarah Drysdale. Thomas Harper...

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Biography of Thomas F. Lawrence

One of the splendidly organized and carefully directed organizations that has been built up in St. Louis is the Missouri State Life Insurance Company, of which Thomas F. Lawrence is the vice president. He might be termed a man of singleness of purpose, so closely has he applied himself to the interests of his business, so carefully organized the work in its different departments and so thoroughly studied every phase of the business to a point when he can speak authoritatively and instructively to any who seek advice or information. An eminent statesman has said that when eastern training and culture are grafted onto western enterprise and opportunity the strongest in American manhood is developed. Such is the record of Mr. Lawrence, who was born in Hartford, Connecticut, February 16, 1877, his parents being Charles H. and Juliette H. (Fisher) Lawrence, the former a native of the state of New York, while the latter was born in Connecticut and belonged to one of the old colonial families The father was identified with the life insurance business for many years and during an extended period was secretary of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of Hartford, Connecticut, where he passed away in September, 1913, at the age of sixty-three years. His widow survives and is yet a resident of Hartford. Thomas F. Lawrence was reared to manhood in the city of...

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Biography of David Milton Boyd

David Milton Boyd, secretary of the Traffic Motor Truck Corporation of St. Louis, was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, August 1, 1878, and is a son of Trustin Brown and Emily (Tousey) Boyd, who are now residents of St. Louis. Their family numbered two sons, the younger being Ingram F., who Is the president of the Boyd-Richardson Men’s Apparel Company of this city. In the acquirement of his education, David Milton Boyd attended Smith Academy of St. Louis, which he entered in 1887, completing his course by graduation in June, 1896. He afterward attended Yale University and won his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1899. He started out in the business world as a representative of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, holding a clerical position with that company until 1901. In the following year he entered the employ of Russell Sage at New Paltz, New York, and in 1900 was made general superintendent of the New Paltz & Poughkeepsie Traction Company, so continuing until 1901. In that year he became general manager of the Shore Line Railway at St. Johns, New Brunswick, where he remained until 1904. During the succeeding five years he was again connected with the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, acting as private secretary to the vice president and later was appointed division freight agent at Newark, New Jersey. With his return to St. Louis Mr....

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel N. Hawkes

Assistant attorney-general of Kansas with a residence at Topeka, Samuel N. Hawkes is one of the older members of the Kansas bar, and had been in active practice in various parts of the state for more than thirty years. He came to Kansas with a training and education received at one of the oldest eastern universities, and his career had been one of uninterrupted success and influential participation in the life of his own community and the state. He was born at Portland, Maine, May 8, 1861, a son of Charles M. and Susan A. (Whitney) Hawkes. His father, who was a wholesale shipper at Portland, up to 1870 and afterwards in the brokerage business there until 1875, moved his family in the latter year to New Haven, Connecticut, in order to educate his children. New Haven was his home the rest of his life. Reared in Portland, Maine, and New Haven, Connecticut, Samuel N. Hawkes followed his course in the common schools with preparatory work at Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, and in 1879 was matrioulated in Yale University. He graduated B. A. in 1883, and two years later received his law degree LL. B. from the same university. Shortly after his graduation he came to Kansas, and practiced at Topeka and Lincoln Center until 1887, when he established his home at Stockton. Mr. Hawkes still maintains...

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Biography of William Waddell Duke, M.D.

Dr. William Waddell Duke, physician of Kansas City, was born in Lexington, Missouri, a son of Henry Buford and Susan (Waddell) Duke, the former a native of Louisville, Kentucky, and the latter of Lexington, Missouri. The father, now retired, was a manufacturer of farm implements and harness of the firm of Buford & George Manufacturing Company. Dr. Duke attended the Kansas City schools until graduated from the high school with the class of 1901. He next entered Yale University and gained his Ph. B. degree in 1904, while in 1908 Johns Hopkins University conferred upon him the M. D. degree, following the completion of the regular four years course in that institution. He next entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as an interne and was graduated in 1910, while in 1911 he did postgraduate work in the University of Vienna. He was voluntary assistant in research at the University of Tubingen, Wurttemberg, in 1912, and since then has devoted his attention to the practice of medicine. He has carried on a consulting practice in internal medicine in Kansas City from 1912 to the present time and has manifested a most active and helpful interest in medical research since entering upon the study o1 medicine and has contributed much to the current literature of the profession. He is the author of a monograph entitled, “Oral Sepsis in Its Relationship to Systemic Disease,”...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard Harvey Johnson

The subject of this sketch, the son and law partner of Richard Z. Johnson, subject of the preceding review, was born at Silver City, in Owyhee County, Idaho, on the 19th of July 1870. He received his education at the Boise high school, and in mathematics and the modern languages at the Concordia, in Zurich, Switzerland, and in Greek and Latin under Professors Lambert and Winneger, at Lindau, in Boden-See, Bavaria. Returning to America, he entered Yale University and afterwards graduated from the law department, with the degree of LL. B., in 1892 just thirty-three years after his father had taken the same degree at the same institution. Returning to Idaho, he entered into partnership with his father, in the practice of the law at Boise City, the capital of the state, with whom he is still associated. At the general election in 1896, Mr. Johnson was elected to the house of representatives of the fourth session of the state legislature, as a Democrat, and served as chairman of the committee on state...

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