Location: New Hanover County NC

Slave Narrative of Lizzie Johnson

Interviewer: Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Lizzie Johnson Location: Biscoe, Arkansas Place of Birth: Holly Springs, Mississippi Age: 65 Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. LIZZIE JOHNSON 706 North Senate Avenue, Apt. 1 Mrs. Johnson’s father, Arthur Locklear, was born in Wilmington, N.C. in 1822. He lived in the South and endured many hardships until 1852. He was very fortunate in having a white man befriend him in many ways. This man taught him to read and write. Many nights after a hard days work, he would lie on the floor in front of the fireplace, trying to study by the light from the blazing wood, so he might improve his reading and writing. He married very young, and as his family increased, he became ambitious for them. Knowing their future would be very dark if they remained South. He then started a movement to come north. There were about twenty-six or twenty-eight men and women, who had the same thoughts about their children, banded together, and in 1852 they started for somewhere, North. The people selected, had to be loyal to the cause of their children’s future lives, morally clean, truthful, and hard-working. Some had oxen, some had carts. They pooled all of their scant belongings, and started on their long hard journey. The women and children rode...

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Slave Narrative of Joseph Anderson

Interviewer: Mrs. Edith S. Hibbs Person Interviewed: Joseph Anderson Location: 1113 Rankin St., Wilmington, North Carolina Yes’m I was born a slave. I belong to Mr. T. C. McIlhenny who had a big rice plantation “Eagles Nest” in Brunswick County. It was a big place. He had lots of slaves, an’ he was a good man. My mother and father died when I was fourteen. Father died in February 1865 and my mother died of pneumonia in November 1865. My older sister took charge of me. Interviewer: “Can you read and write?” Joseph: “Oh yes, I can write a little. I can make my marks. I can write my name. No’m I can’t read. I never went to school a day in my life. I just “picked up” what I know.” I don’t remember much about slave times. I was fourteen when I was freed. After I was freed we lived between 8th and 9th on Chestnut. We rented a place from Dan O’Connor a real estate man and paid him $5 a month rent. I’ve been married twice. First time was married by Mr. Ed Taylor, magistrate in Southport, Brunswick County. I was married to my first wife twenty years and eight months. Then she died. I was married again when I was seventy-five years old. I was married to my second wife just a few years when...

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Slave Narrative of Isabell Henderson

Interviewer: Mrs. Edith S. Hibbs Person Interviewed: Isabell Henderson Location: 1121 Rankin St., Wilmington, North Carolina Age: 83-84 Story Of Isabell Henderson, Negro I’ll be 84 years old come August 9. My gran’-daughter can tell you what year it was I was born I don’ ‘member but we has it down in the Bible. I lived near the “Clock Church” (Jewish Synagogue)[8], 4th and Market. We had a big place there. My gran’mother did the cookin’. My mother did the sewin’. I was jus five years old when the men went away. I guess to the war, I don’ know. Some men came by and conscip’ dem. I don’ know where they went but I guess dey went to war. I was such a little girl I don’t ‘member much. But I does know my Missus was good to me. I used to play with her little boy. I was jes’ one of the family. I played with the little boy around the house’ cause I was never ‘lowed to run the streets. They was good to me. They kept me in clothes, pretty clothes, and good things to eat. Yes’m we was slaves but we had good times. Interviewer: “What did you eat?” Isabell: “Oh I don’t ‘member ‘special but I et jes what the family et.” Maybe my father was killed in the war maybe he run...

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Slave Narrative of Alex Huggins

Interviewer: Mrs. Edith S. Hibbs Person Interviewed: Alex Huggins Location: 920 Dawson St., Wilmington, North Carolina Date of Birth:┬áJuly 9, 1850 Location of Birth: New Bern North Carolina Story Of Alex Huggins, Ex-Slave I was born in New Bern on July 9, 1850. My father and mother belonged to Mr. L. B. Huggins. My father was a carpenter and ship builder an’ the first things I remember was down on Myrtle Grove Sound, where Mr. Huggins had a place. I was a sort of bad boy an’ liked to roam ’round. When I was about twelve years old I ran away. It was in 1863 when the war was goin’ on. Nobody was bein’ mean to me. No, I was’nt bein’ whipped. Don’t you know all that story ’bout slaves bein’ whipped is all _Bunk_, (with scornful emphasis). What pusson with any sense is goin’ to take his horse or his cow an’ beat it up. It’s prope’ty. We was prope’ty. Val’able prope’ty. No, indeed, Mr. Luke give the bes’ of attention to his colored people, an’ Mis’ Huggins was like a mother to my mother. Twa’nt anythin’ wrong about home that made me run away. I’d heard so much talk ’bout freedom I reckon I jus’ wanted to try it, an’ I thought I had to get away from home to have it. Well, I coaxed two other...

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John Douglas Taylor

2nd Lt., 114th M. G. Btn., Co. A, 30th Div., 114th M. G. Regt.; of New Hanover County; son of John Allen and Mrs. May French Taylor. Husband of Mrs. Placide Clark Taylor. Entered service March 29, 1917, at Wilmington, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C. Sailed for France May 12, 1918. Promoted to rank of 2nd Lt. June 15, 1918. Fought with 30th Div. Brigaded with British. Wounded at Hindenburg Line. Suffered fractured head Sept. 24, 1918. Sent to hospitals in France and England and back to U. S. Hospital. Mustered out at Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., March 13,...

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Robert Strange

Capt., F. A., Btry. A, 6th Div., 78th Regt.; of New Hanover County; son of Robert and Mrs. Elizabeth Stone Strange. Husband of Mrs. Mary Taylor Strange. Entered service May 25, 1917, at Wilmington, N.C. Sent to 2nd O. R. T. C., Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., transferred to Camp Logan, Texas, to Camp Douglas, Okla. Sailed for France July 27, 1917. Promoted to rank of Capt. Nov. 27, 1917. Fought south of Verdun with French Army. Mustered out at Camp Dix May 12,...

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George E. Russ

Cook, 115th M. G. Btn., Co. C, 30th Div. Born in New Hanover County, N.C., Jan. 19, 1897; son of J. P. and Fannie Russ. Entered the service at Wilmington, N.C., July, 1917, and sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., and then transferred to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 11, 1918. Fought in all engagements with his company. Returned to the USA March 22, 1919, and mustered out of the service at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 3,...

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Clarence W. Page

2nd Lt., Q. M. C. Born in New Hanover County Aug. 2, 1896; son of W. C. and Annie Page. Entered the service at Wilmington, N.C., May, 1917, and sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky. Transferred to Camp Meiggs, D. C., and from there to Camp Joseph E. Johnston, Fla. Sailed for France Oct. 10, 1918. Promoted Sergt. June 25, 1917; promoted 2nd Lt. Aug. 25, 1918. Returned to the USA Nov. 16, 1918, and mustered out of the service at Camp Bragg, N.C., March 17,...

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James H. Morse

Sergt., C. A. C., 31st Regt. Born in New Hanover County, N.C., Sept. 18, 1894; son of T. M. and Ida Morse. Entered the service at Wilmington, N.C., July 25, 1917, and sent to Ft. Caswell, N.C., and then transferred to Eustis, Va. Mustered out of the service at Eustis, Va., Dec. 8,...

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H. E. Newkirk

Chief Mach. Mate, Naval Aviation; of New Hanover County; son of B. W. and Mrs. Mary K. Newkirk. Entered service Dec. 13, 1917, at Wilmington, N.C. Sent to Pensacola, Fla. Transferred to Great Lakes, Ill., to Hampton Roads, Va. Promoted to Chief Mach. Mate December, 1918. Mustered out at Hampton Roads, Va., May 22,...

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W. L. McGowan

Bugler (Navy); of New Hanover County; son of Mr. and Mrs. E. R. McGowan. Entered service Dec. 11, 1917, at Wilmington, N.C. Sent to Cherrystone Island, Va. Transferred to Virginia Rifle Range, then to receiving ship at Norfolk, Va. Promoted to Bugler Aug. 10, 1918. On U. S. S. Supply Ship from August, 1918, to July, 1919. On U. S. S. Columbia from July, 1919 to August, 1919. Served on supply ship, went to Cuba and Jamaica. Mustered out at Norfolk, Va., Aug. 28,...

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R. B. Lewis

1st Lt., Inf., Co. C, Reg. 3 Replacement; of New Hanover County; son of R. B. and Mary Lewis. Husband of Maud Upchurch Lewis. Entered service June 20, 1917, at Wilmington, N.C. Sent to Ft. Caswell, N.C. Transferred to Camp Jackson, S. C., from there to Camp Gordon, Ga. Promoted to rank of 1st Class Sergt. Jan., 1918; 2d Lt. Aug., 1918; 1st Lt., 1918. Enlisted in N.C. N. G. Nov., 1911. Mustered out at Camp Johnston, Fla., Dec. 5,...

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H. L. Bell

Private, 56th Pioneer Inf. Co. E; of New Hanover County; son of C. F. and Mrs. Lillie Bell. Husband of Mrs. Flossie Bell. Entered service Aug. 8, 1918, at Wilmington, N.C. Sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C. Transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 16, 1918. In A. of O. 3 months. Returned to USA May, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Merritt, N. J., May,...

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New Hanover County, North Carolina Cemetery Transcriptions

North Carolina Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the North Carolina county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington Oakdale Cemetery, which is located in Wilmington, was designed as a rural cemetery. It was chartered in 1852 and its first burial took place in 1855. The Oakdale Cemetery Company has made a comprehensive burial database available on its website. You will find war veterans from all branches of service, politicians, artists, architects,...

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