Location: New Bern North Carolina

New Bern North Carolina High School Yearbooks

These are New Bern NC High School yearbooks for New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. If your ancestor attended high school during the years of 1921-1960 then the following yearbooks may have a photograph of them. This is part of a collection of free yearbooks being scanned and placed online by the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. Yearbooks provide a window into student life. From sports teams to clubs, fashions to hairstyles, these volumes document the changing attitudes and culture of students year by year. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state:...

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Chapel Hill North Carolina High School Yearbooks

These are Chapel Hill North Carolina High School yearbooks for Chapel Hill, Orange County, North Carolina. If your ancestor attended high school during the years of 1921-1961 then the following yearbooks may have a photograph of them. This is part of a collection of free yearbooks being scanned and placed online by the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center. Yearbooks provide a window into student life. From sports teams to clubs, fashions to hairstyles, these volumes document the changing attitudes and culture of students year by year. The North Carolina Digital Heritage Center is a statewide digitization and digital publishing program...

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New Bern North Carolina City Directories

The following directories represent a large collection of New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina directories covering the years of 1911-1963 (not inclusive). These 10 volumes may provide the researcher with valuable data on their New Bern ancestors such as specific address, occupation, business name. As we can we will supplement this list of ours with additional directories as we find them online. A city directory is usually broken up into several useful parts. The genealogist naturally gravitates toward the alphabetical listing of names, since our interest lies primarily in that section. Most of these directories are heavily abbreviated, if you...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Barbour

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Mary Barbour Location: 801 S. Bloodworth Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: McDowell County NC Age: 81 Ex-Slave Story An interview with Mary Barbour 81 of 801 S. Bloodworth Street, Raleigh, N. C. I reckon dat I wuz borned in McDowell County, case dat’s whar my mammy, Edith, lived. She ‘longed ter Mr. Jefferson Mitchel dar, an’ my pappy ‘longed ter er Mr. Jordan in Avery County, so he said. ‘Fore de war, I doan know nothin’ much ‘cept dat we lived on a big plantation an’ dat my mammy wucked hard, but wuz treated pretty good. We had our little log cabin off ter one side, an’ my mammy had sixteen chilluns. Fas’ as dey got three years old de marster sol’ ’em till we las’ four dat she had wid her durin’ de war. I wuz de oldes’ o’ dese four; den dar wuz Henry an’ den de twins, Liza an’ Charlie. One of de fust things dat I ‘members wuz my pappy wakin’ me up in de middle o’ de night, dressin’ me in de dark, all de time tellin’ me ter keep quiet. One o’ de twins hollered some an’ pappy put his hand ober its mouth ter keep it quiet. Atter we wuz dressed he went outside an’ peeped roun’ fer a minute den he comed back...

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Slave Narrative of Alex Huggins

Interviewer: Mrs. Edith S. Hibbs Person Interviewed: Alex Huggins Location: 920 Dawson St., Wilmington, North Carolina Date of Birth: July 9, 1850 Location of Birth: New Bern North Carolina Story Of Alex Huggins, Ex-Slave I was born in New Bern on July 9, 1850. My father and mother belonged to Mr. L. B. Huggins. My father was a carpenter and ship builder an’ the first things I remember was down on Myrtle Grove Sound, where Mr. Huggins had a place. I was a sort of bad boy an’ liked to roam ’round. When I was about twelve years old I ran away. It was in 1863 when the war was goin’ on. Nobody was bein’ mean to me. No, I was’nt bein’ whipped. Don’t you know all that story ’bout slaves bein’ whipped is all _Bunk_, (with scornful emphasis). What pusson with any sense is goin’ to take his horse or his cow an’ beat it up. It’s prope’ty. We was prope’ty. Val’able prope’ty. No, indeed, Mr. Luke give the bes’ of attention to his colored people, an’ Mis’ Huggins was like a mother to my mother. Twa’nt anythin’ wrong about home that made me run away. I’d heard so much talk ’bout freedom I reckon I jus’ wanted to try it, an’ I thought I had to get away from home to have it. Well, I coaxed two other...

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Slave Narrative of George W. Harris

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: George W. Harris Location: 604 E Cabarrus Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: November 25, 1855 Age: 82 Hey, don’t go ‘roun’ dat post gitting it ‘tween you and me, it’s bad luck. Don’t you know it’s bad luck? Don’t want no more bad luck den what I’se already got. My name is George Harris. I wuz born November 25, 82 years ago. I have been living in the City of Raleigh onto 52 years. I belonged to John Andrews. He died about de time I wuz born. His wife Betsy wuz my missus and his son John wuz my marster. Deir plantation wuz in Jones County. Dere were about er dozen slaves on de plantation. We had plenty o’ food in slavery days during my boyhood days, plenty of good sound food. We didn’t have ‘xactly plenty o’ clothes, and our places ter sleep needed things, we were in need often in these things. We were treated kindly, and no one abused us. We had as good owners as there were in Jones County; they looked out for us. They let us have patches to tend and gave us what we made. We did not have much money. We had no church on the plantation, but there wuz one on Marster’s brother’s plantation next ter his plantation. We had suppers an’...

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Biography of Francis Lester Hawkes

The old saying, that North Carolina is a good place to start from, is the key-note to the greatness of her people, as well as a term of reproach as accepted by them. All great men must seek the large centers of civilization in order to give to the world their message, but the great principles of their lives come from the land of their birth. A State is to be measured by the number of its good and great men, and not by material or physical predominance. Even intellectual gifts and culture cannot make a people great, but may become the instruments of their ruin. There are men in every period who shape the life and mold the thought of their time, and among these were some who made higher achievements in particular lines of work, “but in all the elements which form a positive character, in that kind of power which sways the minds of other men, and which molds public opinion, few men of his age deserve to rank higher than Francis Lister Hawks.” Dr. Hawks was born in New Bern, North Carolina, June 10, 1798. He was the second son of Francis and Julia Hawks. His father was of English and his mother of Irish descent. His grandfather, John Hawks, came to America with Governor Tryon, so well known in the early history of our...

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Biography of Edward Graham Daves

One evening in the winter of 1891-’92, in the city of Baltimore, I went to Lehman’s Hall to hear George William Curtis deliver an address before the national meeting of the Civil Service Reform Clubs. Among the prominent men on the platform I noticed a tall gentleman of middle age, with a grave and intelligent face, and of a soldierly hearing. This, I was told, was Professor Edward Graham Daves. I had known of him before this on account of his interest in North Carolina history. Both from what I had Beard and what I then saw. I was very favorably impressed. A short time afterwards I met him. I found that my anticipation was realized. He was a man of charming manners, and of the purest ideals. He was an earnest, intelligent student of the past, an untiring worker, a patriotic American, and in the true old Southern sense, a gentleman. The previous facts of his life, as I afterwards learned, were as follows. Professor Daves was a grandson of Major John Daves, of the Revolutionary army, a son of John Pugh Daves, and was born at New Bern, N. C., March 31, 1833. He began Iris studies at the New Berne Academy, and later prepared for college under private instruction on the plantation of his kinsman, Josiah Collins, near Lake Scuppernong, Washington county, N. C. In 1850...

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