Location: Nevada County CA

Biographical Sketch of William H. Brown

No person is more responsible for San Mateo County’s highway system than William H. Brown, Supervisor from the Second Township. The scenic boulevards which lure thousands of autoists into the county every day is a realization of Brown’s dream of years ago. The second township shows Brown’s good roads mania. Practically all its paved roads and boulevards have been built during his term of office. At a cost of $10,000 he has just completed the resurfacing of the road from Beresford to Redwood City. As a member of the Board of Supervisors and chairman for one term, Brown has worked faithfully for the interests of the county at large. At a speech delivered at San Bruno in 1912 he started the good roads movement that resulted in the passing of the $1,250,000 bond issue and the building for this county of one of the finest systems of boulevards in the United States. Brown has also been exceedingly active in the affairs of San Mateo. In 1904 he was elected city trustee and he served one term as mayor. He was one of the organizers and the first foreman of the San Mateo fire department. Mr. Brown has also been one of the mainstays of the San Mateo County Development Association, being a member of the Board of Governors. William H. Brown came from one of California’s oldest families. He...

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Biography of Samuel P. Cox

Samuel P. Cox was born in Williamsburg, Whitley county, Kentucky, December 16, 1828. In 1839 his parents, Levi and Cynthia Cox, removed to Missouri and located in the eastern part of Daviess county, now known as Jackson township, and the subject of this sketch lived at home and worked upon the farm until 1847. In the spring of that year he enlisted in company D, Captain W. H. Rogers, Oregon Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Powell, commanding, for the war with Mexico. He served until November, 1848, when he received his honorable discharge at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Returning to the old homestead he engaged in work upon the farm during the years 1849 and 1850. In this latter year, on the 7th of July, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ballinger. In the spring of 1851 the removed to Gallatin and entered the mercantile business with George W. Poage as a partner, under the firm name of Cox & Poage, and transacted general business until 1853, when the firm closed out. The next enterprise we find Mr. Cox engaged in is the taking of cattle to California, and he left Daviess county for his drive across the plains in the spring of 1854, and arrived in the “Land of riches,” settling in Grass Valley, Nevada county, where he continued to reside until the fall of 1855, when he removed to...

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Biography of Solomon Hasbrouck

One of the best known pioneer settlers of the state of Idaho is Solomon Hasbrouck, who is now serving as clerk of the supreme court and is accounted one of the leading and influential citizens of Boise. He is numbered among the sons of the Empire state, his birth having occurred in New Paltz, Lister County, New York, on the 30th of May. 1833. He is a descendant of Holland Dutch ancestry, and at an early period in the history of the state the family was founded within its borders. Solomon P. Hasbrouck, the grandfather of our subject, was a prominent lumber manufacturer and merchant and carried on business in such an extensive scale and employed so great a force of workmen that he was called the “king of Centerville.” His son, Alexander Hasbrouck, father of our subject, was born in Centerville and there spent his entire life, passing away in 1894, at the age of eighty-six years. At the age of twenty-three he married Miss Rachel Elting, a native of his own County, and after that conducted a farm about three miles from Centerville for twenty-five years. He then moved to New York City, where for five years he was in business in Washington market. Then he came to Idaho and lived with his son Solomon until his decease. He and his wife were valued members of the...

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Biography of Evan Evans

Evan Evans, a successful business man of Grangeville, came to this town in 1880 and for almost twenty years has been one of her enterprising and highly valued citizens, taking a deep interest in and giving aid to every measure and movement intended to promote the general welfare. He was born in Norway, February 5, 1855, and is of Norwegian ancestry. His parents were Andrew and Mary (Olson) Evans, successful farming people and respected members of the Lutheran church. The subject of this review acquired his education in his native country, and at the age of seventeen went to England, where he took passage on an English steamer and sailed to the Mediterranean Sea. While he was in Italy, May 6, 1872, he entered the United States naval service on board the Shenandoah, a man of war, and sailed under the American flag for two years or until the Shenandoah went out of commission, April 23, 1874. She was commanded by Captain Wells, Lieutenant Higginson and Robley D. Evans. They were at Key West, Florida, for some months, engaged in drill work, and Mr. Evans speaks of his service in the navy as one of the most valuable in his life. He was paid off at New York city and then, leaving the sea, he went to New Hampshire, where he visited his sister, after which he made his...

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Biography of James Edwards

After a long period of active connection with the industrial interests of northern Idaho, James Edwards is now living a retired life in Grangeville. He was born in Richmond, Chittenden county, Vermont, on the 20th of June, 1838, his parents being George and Martha Sophia (Burr) Edwards, both of whom were natives of Massachusetts. The father was a farmer and a dealer in cattle and grain. He attained the age of only fifty years, but his wife lived to the ripe old age of eighty-four years. They were Universalists in religious faith, and Mr. Edwards was a man of ability, taking a leading part in public affairs and serving his district in the state legislature. In the family were twelve children, but one died at the age of five years, another at the age of fifteen, a daughter recently massed away, and later a brother died, leaving eight of the family yet living. In the common schools James Edwards acquired a fair English education, which has been supplemented by knowledge gained through observation and business experience. He entered upon his business career as clerk in a store in Acton, Massachusetts, spent some time in Pennsylvania, and on the 1st of March 1856, sailed from New York city for California, on the steamer Illinois. Reaching the western shore of the isthmus, he took passage on the John L. Stevens, and...

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Biography of Jacob C. Garber

The efficient and capable postmaster of Grangeville, Jacob C. Garber, is a native of Rockingham County, Virginia, born near Fort Republic, January 7, 1829. The family is of Swiss origin and the ancestors of our subject crossed the Atlantic to the New World prior to the Revolutionary war. They were long residents of Pennsylvania and Virginia, and in religious faith were Dunkards. Martin Garber, the father of our subject, was born in the Old Dominion and married Miss Magdalen Mohler, a lady of German lineage and a representative of one of the old Virginian families. Fourteen children were born of this union, of whom eight sons and three daughters grew to years of maturity. The father was a farmer by occupation, and died of palsy, in the fifty-fourth year of his age. His wife attained a very advanced age and finally met death by accident, in the upsetting of a stagecoach in which she was a passenger. Jacob C. Garber, their fourth child, was educated in Virginia and Ohio, the family having removed to the latter state when he was fourteen years of age. Subsequently he emigrated with an older brother to Iowa, and in 1854 he sailed from New York to California, going by way of the Nicaragua route to San Francisco, where he arrived on the 13th of August. He then engaged in mining in Sierra and...

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Biography of Charles D. Armstrong

In a record of those who have been prominently identified with the development and progress of Latah county it is imperative that definite consideration be granted to the subject of this review, for not only is he a prominent representative of the agricultural interests of this favored section, but has the distinction of being one of the pioneers of the golden west, with whose fortunes he has been identified for fully forty years, concerned with varied industrial pursuits and so ordering his life as to gain and retain the confidence and esteem of his fellow men. Charles Dexter Armstrong is a native of the old Buckeye state, having been born in Knox County, Ohio, on the 22d of January 1834, and being a representative of sterling old southern families. His father, John Armstrong, was born in Owen County, Kentucky, and did valiant service as a soldier in the war of 1812, being a member of an Ohio regiment. As a young man he married Miss Melinda Hinton, a native of the state of Maryland, and soon after their marriage they removed to Ohio, where they established their home and reared a family of eleven children. They were members of the Methodist church and were conscientious and upright in all the relations of life. The mother departed this life in the fifty-fourth year of her age, and the father lived...

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Ingram,Chester – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Chet Ingram Killed Under Wheels of Logging Truck Marr Flat Mishap Fatal to Logger Chester Ingram, 36, of Joseph was instantly killed about 8:30 a.m. Tuesday morning when a logging trailer ran over him during logging operations on Marr Flat. The truck which struck Ingram was driven by Wilbur Curry of Joseph. Curry reported that his truck had just been loaded at the jammer and Ingram was assisting him in tightening the chains and checking the load. While Curry was partly under the truck and Ingram was stepping behind the load, the truck started rolling slowly backward. One of the dual wheels of the trailer caught Ingram’s foot and ran up his body. Curry dived into the truck to set the brakes but it was too late. Chester Earl Ingram, son of Carl and Josephine Lockwood-Ingram, was born June 1, 1917 at Halfway, Oregon. On Dec. 8, 1952 he was married at Walla Walla to Helen Reece, who survives him. He was a veteran of World War II, a member of the Eagles Lodge, and of the Christian church of Grass Valley, Calif. He was a logger by occupation and had lived in Joseph for the past year, coming here from Grass Valley. Surviving, in addition to his wife and parents of Joseph, are one sister, Clara Ingram of Prairie City, Ore., one brother, Walter...

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Ormsby, Irene A. Newstrom – Obituary

Irene A. Ormsby, 90, of Grass Valley died Friday [October 15, 1993] in a local medical facility. Funeral services will be conducted at 1 p.m. Thursday and entombment will take place at Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland. Mrs. Ormsby was born Sept. 27, 1903, in Selma to David M. and Emma Newstrom. She lived in the Bay Area for 40 years before moving to Grass Valley one year ago. She lived in Modesto before moving to the Bay Area. She enjoyed ballroom dancing. Her family was the focus of her life. She is survived by her son Duane M. Ormsby of Grass Valley; sisters Gladys Green and Grace Gilbert of Modesto; brothers Les and Mel Newstrom of Stockton; four grandchildren and five great grandchildren. She is preceded in death by husband Morris Ormsby. Arrangements are under the direction of Hooper and Weaver Mortuary. The Union, Grass Valley-Nevada City, October 18, 1993 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Ormsby, Duane Maurice – Obituary

In accordance with his wishes, no services are planned for Duane Maurice Ormsby, 69, of Grass Valley. He died Saturday, Dec. 25 [1999], at a local hospital, following a long battle with multiple sclerosis. He was born Aug. 24, 1930 in Oakland. Mr. Ormsby had been a Nevada County resident for 12 years. Mr. Ormsby was an Army veteran, serving in the Korean War. He was a former resident of the Bay Area. He was a second degree black belt in Judo, and was a Judo instructor at Albany Y. Takamoto Judo and was affiliated with the San Francisco Judo Institute. He worked for 35 years as a glazier and was a member of the Glazier and Glass Worker’s Union, Local No. 169. He enjoyed fishing for salmon and trout. He is survived by his wife, Dolores; daughter, Debbie; sons Duane, David, and Donald; and five grandchildren. His family has asked that memorial contributions be directed to the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America, 706 Haddonfield Road, Cherry Hill, NJ, 08002. Arrangements are under the direction of the Chapel of the Angels. [Duane’s ashes were given to his wife.] The Union, Grass Valley-Nevada City, December 27, 1999 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biography of Belden D. Burt

The subject of this sketch is one of the pioneer merchants of Riverside, and is the senior member of the firm of B. D. Burt & Brother. This is now the oldest mercantile firm in the city, having been established in 1875, and been continuously in business since that time. The first brick block erected in Riverside was that occupied by Mr. Burt, on the corner of Main and Eighth streets. For many years he conducted a general mercantile business, but in the later years, has confined his business to dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes, etc. Mr. Burt’s partner in his business is his brother, Benjamin Franklin Burt, and it is safe to say that there is no business firm whose standing is higher in the community than B. D. Burt & Brother, nor is there one that has inspired more confidence or gained a heartier support than this firm. The brothers are well known, and their years of dealing has been characterized by honest, straightforward business principles. Their word has ever been as good as the strongest bond; their name is synonymous with integrity and stability for years before the advent of banking institutions in Riverside. They were made the custodians of the funds of their customers, and even now their books show a large list of depositors. The subject of this sketch was born in Orange...

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Biography of David Morey

David Morey, one of the pioneers of Redlands, was born in Perry County, Pennsylvania, in 1824. His father, Jacob Morey, moved to Delaware County, Ohio, at an early day, and took a farm out of the woods. He died there at the age of ninety years. His mother, Barbara (Jacobs) Morey, is still living, at the advanced age of ninety-two years. The subject of this sketch left home at the age of fourteen to learn the cabinet trade. He worked at this trade in Marysville, and in 1842 went to Indianapolis, where he remained until 1845. He then went to Lexington, Kentucky, and in 1850 started from St. Louis across the plains to California. They left Independence, Missouri, May 10, 1850, and were on the way four months to Nevada City, California. Mr. Morey, like many others, engaged in mining from 1850 to 1858. He then went to Scottsburg, Oregon, where he worked at the cabinet trade and ship-joining on river steamers. Then he went to Columbia River and helped built steamers. After this he came back to the Cascades and built the steamer “Iris;” then to Puget Sound, to Victoria, and finished the steamer “Alexandria,” for William Moore. He then went to Umpqua River and built the steam sawmill and the schooners, “William F. Brown,” “Pacific” and “Mary Cleveland.” In 1870 he went to San Francisco, and from...

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Nevada County, California Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Nevada County California Tombstone Transcription Project) Red Dog Cemetery North San Juan Protestant Cemetery Historic Cemeteries of Nevada County (hosted at Only in My Dreams ) Country Graveyard Graniteville Cemetery French Corral Cemetery Lone Grave on Bald Mountain Loney-Sanford Ranch Cemetery Masonic Cemetery , Grass Valley Pine Grove Cemetery , Nevada City New Odd Fellows Cemetery Odd Fellows Cemetery, Grass Valley Surnames A-C Surnames D-G Surnames H-K Surnames L-N Surnames O-S Surnames T-Z Odd Fellows Cemetery , At Pine Grove Cemetery Old Elm Ridge Cemetery Old St. Patrick’s Cemetery Pioneer Cemetery Red Dog Cemetery Red Men’s Cemetery Rough & Ready Cem. Sweetland Cemetery You Bet Cemetery Following Cemeteries (hosted at Interment.net) Greenwood Memorial Gardens (St. Patrick’s Catholic Cemetery) Pine Grove Cemetery Sierra Mountains Cemetery Smartsville Cemetery (Yuba County)  ...

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Biography of Hon. Jesse B. Ball

HON. JESSE B. BALL. – Twenty miles up the Skagit river, in the heart of one of the richest timber sections of Washington, is Sterling, a thriving young city, with high hopes for the future. The founder of the place is the man whose name appears at the head of this sketch. Mr. Ball is a pioneer of 1853, having crossed the plains in that year and stopped at Downieville, where he worked a short time for a company of miners, – his only work for anybody but himself on this coast. His career has had the restless activity and energy characteristic of our people. At Nevada City and other points he was engaged in mining for two years. At Oroville he was in the stock business for nine years. Taking advantage of the no-fence law, he then spent three years at Honey Lake valley, in the same pursuit. In 1867 he came to Puget Sound, and in 1868 farmed for a year on the Nisqually bottoms. Logging and lumbering near Steilacoom engaged his attention until 1878. It was in that year that he came to Whatcom (now Skagit), and started the town of Sterling. Here he kept a store and logging camp. A year ago he sold his store and his timber lands, and confined himself to farming and real estate, owning several sixty and seventy acre tracts...

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