Location: Nauvoo Illinois

Biography of John Davis

John Davis, of Jonesburg, familiarly known as “Uncle John,” is the oldest son of the late Thomas Davis, of Shenandoah Co., Va. John was born October 30, 1791, in Shenandoah County, and is now nearly 85 years of age. When he was about sixteen his parents removed to Bourbon Co., Ky., and when the war of 1812 began, he enlisted in the army and served under Generals Winchester and Payne. He was stationed at Forts Wayne and Laramie, in Ohio, for some time. In 1820 he came to Missouri, and stopped a short time in St. Louis, which then had only one principal street, and most of the houses were made of square posts set upright, with the spaces between filled with straw and mud, the chimneys being built of the same material. The court house was surrounded by a post-and-rail fence, and young Davis was sitting on this fence when the announcement was made that the Territory of Missouri had become a State. From St. Louis Mr. Davis went to Pike County, and settled in Clarksville, where he lived forty-six years. In those days rattlesnakes were much more abundant than they are now, and the old pioneers would occasionally go on “snaking” frolics. They always came back vomiting from the effects of the poisonous smell of the snakes. On one occasion Mr. Davis and his neighbors went to...

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Biography of Joseph C. Rich

Judge Joseph C. Rich, eldest son of Hon. Charles C. Rich, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this history, was born in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, January 16, 1841. His mother’s maiden name was Sarah D. Pea, good stock all around, his ancestors being of that hardy pioneer school who have subdued the wilds of the middle and western states and made possible the grandeur of those noble commonwealths. When but a boy of five years he, in connection with his parents and several thousand others, was driven from the city of his birth by mobocratic persecution, and commenced that historic journey, the Mormon exodus toward the setting sun, which has since resulted in the settlement and the development of our great “Inter-Mountain Empire.” He wintered in 1846-7 at Mount Pisgah, then a portion of the wilderness of Iowa. At this place nearly one-third of that camp died during the winter, through sickness brought on by exposure and want. The well peopled graveyard found there by the permanent settlers who subsequently settled that region, attests sufficiently that fact. As soon as grass could grow in the spring of 1847 the journey westward was resumed and continued throughout the summer until one thousand four hundred miles long, lonesome and weary ones brought them, on the 2d day of October 1847, to the then parched and desolate valley of the...

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Biography of Charles C. Rich

Pioneer of Utah, California and Idaho, Charles C. Rich figured prominently in the early development of these states, and took an active part in furthering the welfare and promoting the progress of the commonwealths. He was also a most able exponent of the faith of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and with a colony of believers he founded the beautiful and thriving little city of Paris, the County of Bear Lake, Idaho, and the Mormon colonies of southeastern Idaho. A native of Kentucky, Mr. Rich was born in Campbell County, in 1809, and was of English and Irish ancestry. His parents removed to Indiana during his youth and there he was educated. In 1829 they went to Illinois, becoming pioneer settlers of that state, and in April 1832, Charles C. Rich embraced the faith and was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, becoming one of its most faithful and prominent adherents. In 1839 he went to Nauvoo, Illinois, where he remained until 1846, and while there he was elected an adjutant general in the Mormon forces, a part of the Illinois militia. A little later, however, the regiment was disbanded by the governor of the state. At that time Mr. Rich had been ordained a high priest of the church. In the fall of 1846, in the general Mormon exodus,...

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Biography of Albert D. Bauer

Albert D. Bauer. One of the veterans of the printing trade and an old time publisher in Kansas, Albert D. Bauer acquired his first experience in “the art preservative of all arts” in a Topeka print shop. That was nearly forty years ago, and for the past twenty-three years he has lived continuously in Topeka. Mr. Bauer was born in the historic old seat of the Mormons in the Middle West, Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, March 6, 1863. His grandfather John Bauer Sr. was born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, coming to America in 1820 and locating as a pioneer in Stark County, Ohio. He was a vineyardist there and engaged extensively in the wine making business. In 1840 he moved with his family to Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, from which locality the Mormons had been only a short time departed. Before leaving the old country John Bauer Sr. married Miss Eber, a native of Hesse Darmstadt. To them were born a large family of fifteen children, twelve of whom grew to manhood and womanhood, and seven of them are still living in the year 1916, thus proving the wonderful vitality of this stock. John Bauer Jr., father of Albert D., was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1834. A private school gave him a liberal education, and in early manhood he became a traveling salesman for clothing. He followed...

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Biographical Sketch of Andrew Lytle

Andrew Lytle, deceased, was born in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, in 1812. His parents moved to Akron, Ohio, when he was a small boy. At the age of twenty-one years he went back to Pennsylvania and married Hannah Hull. This lady was the daughter of Abner and Martha (Skinner) Hull, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Connecticut. In 1834, two years after his marriage, he moved to Portage County, Ohio. Next he moved to Bidwell County, Missouri, and two years later to Nauvoo, Illinois. From the latter place he removed to Salt Lake, where he remained several years. In 1850 he came to California and was one of the first settlers at San Bernardino. Ile was a blacksmith by trade and followed that business for several years. He owned some fine land and was very successful. At one time he was mayor of San Bernardino, and has held various offices of public trust. He had eight children: Olive, now Mrs. Amasa Mariam; Serena E., now Mrs. Lacy Stilson; Heber John, who married Sarah McCrary; La Fayette, married Sophronia Parker; Mariette, wife of Harley Swarthout; Charles Loran, Lyman Melvin and Orissa. Mr. Lytle died in 1870, and his widow resides at the old home on Third Street near the Santa Fe depot, in San...

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Biography of Danford Atwood

Danford Atwood was born in Connecticut in 1823. His parents were Mormons and moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, at an early day, and from thence to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where in 1850 Mr. Atwood married Miss Jane Garner, of Hancock County, Illinois. She was the daughter of George and Elizabeth (Hedrick) Garner, natives respectively of North Carolina and Indiana. They had six children. Mrs. Garner died in Illinois at the age of thirty-two, and Mr. Garner married Lydia Hill. In 1836 he went to Council Bluffs, where he remained nearly two years, and then came to California, in 1852, by ox team. He bought land on Lytle creek, where the woolen mill now stands, and was there for twenty years. He then sold out and went to Salt Lake, where he was killed by a runaway team August 31, 1877. After our subject’s marriage he lived at Council Bluffs ten years, where he was engaged in farming and stock raising. May 1, 1860, he left Council Bluffs, crossing the plains to California, and arrived in San Bernardino December 1 of the same year. Here he bought land, which he held two years and then sold. He then bought 100 acres of land in Warm creek district, where he now lives, built a comfortable residence and has done a good dairying business, also stock-raising and general farming for several years. They...

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Biography of F. Garner

F. Garner, residing on Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, was born near Quincy, Illinois, March 5, 1835. His parents were George and Elizabeth Garner. His father moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, at an early day, and remained there one year when he crossed the plains to Utah, where he spent one winter. Frank was fifteen years of age when they left the Missouri river, and he drove an ox team all the way to California. While crossing the Missouri river on a ferry-boat, the team which he afterward drove became frightened and jumped off the boat into the water, and swam across safely with the yoke on. They left St. Joe with a train of sixty wagons in the spring of 1850, but many died on the way of cholera. The train being so long they divided it into six divisions of ten wagons each, and took turns leading. The ten wagons that led one day fell behind the next. George Garner was captain of ten wagons, and one day he was to lead he told his men to follow, and do hard driving, and by that means they would leave the rest behind, which they did, and got to the end of the journey just two weeks in advance of the rest. They lost two of their number by cholera and had some trouble with the Indians. Mr. Garner...

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Biography of Joseph Camp Thorn

Joseph Camp Thorn, residing four miles east of San Bernardino on the Base Line, is one of the pioneers of this county. He was born in New York, January 2, 1839, the son of Joseph and Lorana (Camp) Thorn. When the subject of this sketch was three years of age his father moved to Nauvoo, Illinois. The next year he removed to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and the following year he moved to Salt Lake. Our subject was then eight years old and he drove an ox team all the way from Council Bluffs to Salt Lake. Mr. Thorn lived at Salt Lake for ten days and, disgusted with the Mormon religion, went back to Iowa; then came on, in 1854, to California. The subject of this sketch, then a lad of fourteen, drove his ox team from Salt Lake to San Bernardino. While on the journey he stood a regular herd and guard tower with the men. After his arrival here he worked at various occupations, and in 1858 was married to Miss Mary H. Dickson, born in Iowa. Her parents, David and Nancy (Stevens) Dickson, natives of Canada, crossed the plains in 1853, losing a man and nearly all their stock by Indians, and located at San Bernardino. At one time Mr. Dickson owned the block where the Stewart Hotel now stands, and other valuable property. He died...

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