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Location: Muskogee County OK

Biographical Sketch of Judge A. E. Robertson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Ghigau, Foreman, Riley and Conrad).—Arthur Evans son of Evans Price and Sarah Ellen (Spears) Robertson was born at Hulbert, Cherokee Nation, Tuesday, September 18, 1888. He was educated in the Cherokee National Schools, Henry Kendall College of Muskogee, graduating from the preparatory department; St. Charles Military College, St. Charles, Missouri; University of Tulsa, from which he graduated; University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and University of Paris, Paris, France. He served in the A. E. F. in France with the 143rd Infantry, 36th Division. His Cherokee name is Wah-la-seee and he belongs to the Bird Clan. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and the Knights of Pythias fraternity. Reverend Evans Price, son of Wade Hampton, and Diana (Hair) Robertson was born at Tahlequah, October 10, 1855. Married at Tahlequah, June 24, 1883 Sarah Ellen, daughter of Eli and Elizabeth (Hall) Spears, born at Catchertown, Tahlequah District, April 3, 1855. Wade Hampton Robertson a native of McMinn County, Tennessee. A member of Company E Second Indian Home Guards. He was killed in a skirmish at Tahlequah on March 28, 1863, originally buried in the Cherokee Capitol square but later removed to the city cemetery. Arthur Evans Robertson was elected County Judge of Cherokee County, November 2,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. A. R. Matheron

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Thompson, Thornton and Oolootsa) —Maudie, daughter of Henry arid Susan F. (Thompson) Eiffert was born January 1, 1872 at Ft. Gibson, educated at Vinita and in the Female Seminary; married at Muskogee, October 1, 1889 Alexander Ross Mathewson, born March 28, 1867 in St. Louis, Missouri. From this union the following children were born: Floyd, born October 9, 1894, married Lola Beaubean; Richard Thomson, born January 13, 1897, married Erin Forsyth; Ross, born May 24, 1899, married Grace Parrish and Helen Matheson, born October 24, 1902, married LaFayette...

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Slave Narrative of Sweetie Ivery Wagoner

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now If I was born the year of freedom or the year before my mammy didn’t know. Her name was Betty Ivery and pappy’s name was Louis Ivery, belonging to old Newt Titsworth who had a big plantation somewheres in Arkansas, but I don’t know what the name of the town. Only thing I know that man had a big place – as far as the eye could see that man owned it. He had seven or eight slave families on the place; my mother was the house girl, done the spinning, the cooking, the cleaning and all such. The old master was good to the slaves my mammy always said; never whipped them, but if they got mean and worthless he would sell them. My father was a slave, but he wasn’t a Negro. He was a Creek Indian whom the Cherokee Indians stole long years ago and put in slavery just like he was a Negro, and he married with a slave woman (her mother, Betty) and raised a big family. There was King, Louis, Marry, Cindy, Lucy, Jane, Fannie, Martha, Emma, Adeline and myself. I don’t know where any is now, we all get separated after the war and never find each other. Master Titsworth’s house was a pretty good frame place; the slave...

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Slave Narrative of R. C. Smith

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: R. C. Smith Occupation: Prophet One morning in May I heard a poor rebel say; “The federal’s a home guard Dat called me from home…” I wish I was a merchant And could write a fine hand, I’d write my love a letter So she would understand. I wish I had a drink of brandy, And a drink of wine, To drink wid dat sweet gal How I wish dat she was mine. If I had a drink of brandy No longer would I roam, I’d drink it wid dat gal of mine Dat wishes me back home. I’ve heard the soldiers sing that song a heap of times. They sung it kind of lonesome like and I guess it sort of made them home sick to sing it. Us niggers learned to sing it and it is about the only one I can sing yet. I remembers the words to another one we used to sing but I’ve forgot the tune but the words go like this: Old man, old man Your hair is getting gray, I’d foller you ten thousand miles To hear your banjo play. I never was much at singing though. I guess my voice is just about wore out just like my body. I’ve always had good health and...

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Slave Narrative of J. W. Stinnett

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: J. W. Stinnett Place of Birth: Grayson County, Prairie Grove, Texas Date of Birth: 1863 What with raising nine grandchildren whose mammy is dead, this old head of mine has too many troubles to remember much about them slave days, but anyways I was born in 1863, at a place in Grayson County, Texas, name of Prairie Grove. My mammy come from Virginia, where pappy come from I don’t know, and where he went I don’t know, because he take off to the north during the war and never come back. His name was George Stinnett and mammy’s name was Mary Stinnett. They belonged to a big and fat Creek Indian name of Frank Stinnett who one time lived right around Muskogee here. That was before the war I guess, for mammy told me when the fighting begun the old master bundled up a tent with some food stuffs and moved down to Texas, taking mammy and pappy with him. They was his only slaves and they said he treated them good and feed them good. That old Indian live in a tent during the summer and cook everything on the open fire, but in the winter he go into his log cabin, coming out once in a while for to hunt squirrels and rabbits...

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Slave Narrative of Johnson Thompson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Johnson Thompson Place of Birth: Texas Date of Birth: December 1853 Just about two weeks before the coming of Christmas Day in 1853, I was born on a plantation somewheres eight miles east of Bellview, Rusk County, Texas. One year later my sister Phyllis was born on the same place and we been together pretty much of the time ever since, and I reckon there’s only one thing that could separate us slave born children. Mammy and pappy belong to W.P. Thompson, mixed-blood Cherokee Indian, but before that pappy had been owned by three different masters; one was the rich Joe Vann who lived down at Webber Falls and another was Chief Lowery of the Cherokees. I had a brother named Harry who belonged to the Vann family at Tahlequah. There was a sister named Patsy; she died at Wagoner, Oklahoma. My mother was born ‘way back in the hills of the old Flint District of the Cherokee Nation; just about where Scraper, Okla., is now. My parents are both dead now seems like fifty, maybe sixty year ago. Mammy died in Texas, and when we left Rusk County after the Civil War, pappy took us children to the graveyard. We patted her grave and kissed the ground,telling her good-bye. Pappy is buried in...

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Slave Narrative of Victoria Taylor Thompson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Victoria Taylor Thompson Age: 80 My mother, Judy Taylor, named for her mistress, told me that I was born about three year before the war; that make me about 80 year old so they say down at the Indian Agency where my name is on the Cherokee rolls since all the land was give to the Indian families a long time ago. Father kept the name of ‘Doc’ Hayes, and my brother Coose was a Hayes too, but mother, Jude, Patsy, Bonaparte (Boney, we always called him), Lewis and me was always Taylors. Daddy was bought by the Taylors (Cherokee Indians); they made a trade for him with some hilly land, but he kept the name of Hayes even then. Like my mother, I was born on the Taylor place. They lived in Flint District, around the Caney settlement on Caney Creek. Lots of the Arkansas Cherokees settled around there long times before the Cherokees come here from the east, my mother said. The farm wasn’t very big, we was the only slaves on the place, and it was just a little ways from a hill everybody called Sugar Mountain, because it was covered with maple sugar trees, and an old Indian lived on the hillside, making maple sugar candy to sell and trade....

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Slave Narrative of Lucinda Vann

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Place of Birth: Webbers Falls, Oklahoma Age: 92-100+ Yes, Sa. My name’s Lucinda Vann, I’ve been married twice but, that don’t make no difference. Indians wouldn’t allow their slaves to take their husband’s name. Oh, Lord, no. I don’t know how old I is; some folks say I’se ninety-two and some say I must be a hundred. I’se born across the river in the plantation of old Jim Vann in Webbers Falls, I’se born right in my marster and missus bed. Yes I was. You see, I’se one of them sudden cases. My mother, Betsy Vann, worked in the big house for the missus. She was weavin’ when the case came up so quick, missus Jennie put her on her own bed and took care of her. Master Jim and Missus Jennie was good to their slaves. Yes, Lord, yes. My missus name was Doublehead before she married Jim Vann. They was Cherokee Indians. They had a big, big plantation down by the river and they was rich. Had sacks and sacks of money. There was five hundred slaves on that plantation and nobody ever lacked for nothin’. Everybody had fine clothes, everybody had plenty to eat. Lord, yes, suer. Now I’se just old forgotten woman. Sometimes if I eat my bread this mornin’ none this...

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Slave Narrative of William W. Watson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Do I remember slavery? Who could forget these lash prints on my back. Some time I set here and look at my wife and think Lord help me look what I live through. Me and my wife had a car wreck early last year, that made her lose her mind so she just sings all the time cant think. Raises chickens and talks like a baby. She is two years older than me, and too she is the mother of thirteen children, had lots of trouble. I am still able to find the cows and horses that belong to my son. My wife has the prettyest name, Betsy Ann Davis, then she was sold to Donivan, he called her Annier, but I still say Betsy Ann. My wife just weighed 120 pounds use to weigh one hundred. My mother belonged to the same master that my wife did ole man Davis, Master Tom we calls him. My mother was Eliza Davis, and my paw was Baker Watson. Father was brought from some place to W. Virginia and sold, I never learned the place. When they was bought they come to Tennessee. I do not know the place. Henry Watson owned my father, and Tom Davis owned my mother. Davis lived in Tennessee. Watson’s plantation joined Davis...

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Slave Narrative of Acemey Wofford

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Acemey Wofford Date of Birth: June 13 Age: 100 (about) The folks say I’m about 100 years old but there’s no way of me telling about that. I remember the master told me I was born on June 13, but I don’t know what was the year. Maybe I know once, but not now, for the only things I remember now is about the master. I mean my second master who brought me from somewhere in Mississippi to Texas. He was Doctor Hayes; the mistress was Malissa. She was mean, not like the master himself. When the mistress got mad, and that was likely to happen most any time, the slaves got pretty rough handling. She would pick up anything close and let it fly. Buckets or stone jars, sticks or boards, didn’t make no difference just so’s it was loose. I didn’t get around during the slave days. Just worked in the fields like a man and toted water to the master’s house. It was a big log house and it seemed like somebody was always wanting water; I wear myself out keeping water in the house. The night peace was told me I prayed to the Lord. I was thankful. And then after the freed Negroes got to leaving their old homes...

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Slave Narrative of Annie Groves Scott

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Annie Groves Scott Place of Birth: Lyonsville, South Carolina Date of Birth: March 18, 1845 Just before the war broke out I was fifteen year old and my mistress told me I was born March 18, 1845, at a little place she called Lyonsville, South Carolina. Maw (that’s all the name she ever called her mother) was born at Charlotte, N.C., and father was born at Lyonsville, same as me, and his name was Levi Grant, which changed to Groves when he was sold by Master Grant. That was when I was a baby and I wants to tell you about that on down the line. I had a brother name of Robert. How old my folks was I never know, but I know their folks come from Africa on a slave boat. One of my uncles who was done brought here from that place, and who was a slave boatman on the Savannah river, he never learned to talked plain, mostly just jabber like the Negroes done when they first get here. Maw told about how the white people fool the Negroes onto the slave boat; how the boatmen would build pens on the shore and put red pieces of cloth in the pens and the fool Negroes would tear the pen down...

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Slave Narrative of George Kye

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: George Kye Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 110 I was born in Arkansas under Mr. Abraham Stover, on a big farm about twenty miles north of Van Buren. I was plumb grown when the Civil War come along, but I can remember back when the Cherokee Indians was in all that part of the country Joe Kye was my pappy’s name what he was born under back is Garrison County, Virginia, and I took that name when I was freed, but I don’t know whether he took it or not because he was sold off by old Master Stover when I was a child. I never have seen him since. I think he wouldn’t mind good, leastways that what my mammy say. My mammy was named Jennie and I don’t think I had any brothers or sisters, but they was a whole lot of children at the quarters that I played and lived with. I didn’t live with mammy because she worked all the time, and us children all stayed in one house. It was a little one room log cabin, chinked and daubed, and you couldn’t stir us with a stick. When we went to eat we had a big pan and all ate out of it. One what ate the fastest got...

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Slave Narrative of Liza Smith

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Liza Smith Location: Muskogee, Oklahoma Age: 91 Both my mammy and pappy was brought from Africa on a slave boat and sold on de Richmond (Va.) slave market. What year dey come over I don’t know. My mammy was Jane Mason, belonging to Frank Mason; pappy was Frank Smith, belonging to a master wid de same name. I mean, my pappy took his Master’s name, and den after my folks married mammy took de name of Smith, but she stayed on wid de Masons and never did belong to my pappy’s master. Den, after Frank Mason took all his slaves out of de Virginia county, mammy net up wid another man, Ben Humphries, and married him. In Richmond, dat’s where I was born, ’bout 1847, de Master said; and dat make me more dan 90-year old dis good year. I had two brothers named Webb and Norman, a half-brother Charley, and two half-sisters, Mealey and Ann. Me, I was born a slave and so was my son. His father, Toney, was one of de Mason slave boys; de Master said I was ’bout 13-year old when de boy was born. Frank Mason was a young man when de war started, living wid his mother. Dey had lots of slaves, maybe a hundred, and dey...

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Slave Narrative of Hal Hutson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Hal Hutson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Galveston, Tennessee Date of Birth: October 12, 1847 Age: 90 I was born at Galveston, Tennessee, October 12, 1847. There were 11 children: 7 brothers; Andrew, George, Clent, Gilbert, Frank, Mack and Horace; and 3 girls Eosie, Marie and Eancy. We were all Hutsons. Together with my mother and father we worked for the same man whose name was Mr. Barton Brown, but who we all call Master Brown, and sometime. Master Brown had a good weather-board house, two story, with five or six rooms. They lived pretty well. He had eight children. We lived in one-room log huts. There were a long string of them huts. We slept on the floor like hogs. Girls and boys slept together, jest everybody slept every whar. We never knew what biscuits were! We ate “seconds and shorts” (wheat ground once) for bread. Ate rabbits, possums baked with taters, beans, and been soup. No chicken, fish and the like. My favorite dish now is beans. Master Brown owned about 36 or 40 slaves, I can’t recall jest now, and about 200 acres of ground. There was very little cotton raised in Galveston, I mean jest some corn. Sometimes we would shuck corn all night. He would not let...

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Slave Narrative of Morris Sheppard

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Morris Sheppard Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Date of Birth: November, 1852 Age: 85 Old Master tell me I was borned in November 1852, at de old home place about five miles east of Webbers Falls, mebbe kind of northeast, not far from de east bank of de Illinois River. Master’s name was Joe Sheppard, and he was a Cherokee Indian. Tall and slin and handsome. He had black eyes and mustache but his hair was iron gray, and everybody liked him because he was so good-natured and kind. I don’t remember old Mistress’ name. My mammy was a Crossland Negro before she come to belong to Master Joe and marry my pappy, and I think she come wid old Mistress and belong to her. Old Mistress was small and mighty pretty too, and she was only half Cherokee. She inherit about half a dozen slaws, and say dey was her own and old Master can’t sell one unless she give him leave to do it. Dey only had two families of slaves wid about twenty in all, and dey only worked about fifty acres, so we sure did work every foot of it good. We git three or four crops of different things out of dat farm every year. and something growing on dat...

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