Location: Muskingum County OH

Through Ohio And Kentucky

Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport, eighteen months old, from $30 to $100. This day being Monday and the...

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Genealogy of Linzie Otis Stoneburner

Linzie O., son of John M. and Margaret Stoneburner, continued living on a farm near Herrick. On the 25 April 1901 he married Ella Alice Miller, daughter of Benedict and Lucie Spockwell Miller. Linzie and Ella had a family of four children. In January of 1931, “about 40 neighbors and friends gathered at the home of L. O. Stoneburner and family to spend the evening. Following are the names of those present: Charles McKittrick and wife; Hubert Smart and family; Ellis Corley and wife; Arthur Salmons and family; Mrs. Lamora Manuel and children; Lawrence Stoneburner and family; Dorothy Campbell; John Stoneburner and family and Charles Wakefield. The evening was spent in playing music and games. Refreshments of pop corn and home made candy were served. A very pleasant evening was enjoyed by all. On June 28, 1934 Ella had surgery at the Pana hospital. She died a few days later. Her obituary read: “Ella Alice Stoneburner, daughter of Benedict and Lucy Miller, was born in Marion Co., Indiana, August 10, 1883 and departed this life July 4th 1934, at the age of 50 years, 10 months and 24 days. She was united in marriage to Linzie Stoneburner, April 25th 1901. Besides her companion and children she leaves to mourn her departure two sisters: Mrs. Joe Terrell of Rossville and Mrs. Robert Middleton of Tenexa, Kansas; three brothers: Clarence E.,...

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Genealogy of John Marion Stoneburner

John M., son of Robert and Margaret Landerman Stoneburner, lived in Muskingum County, Ohio after his marriage to Margaret Hannah Mohler on 11 March 1869. She was the daughter of Adam and Caroline Dozer Mohler. Sometime in 1884 the family moved to Shelby County, Illinois. On Monday September 3, 1928, “about 40 members of the Stoneburner families gathered at the home of John M. Stoneburner and wife to enjoy the day. There were five generations present. At the noon hour a bountiful dinner was served on the lawn. All enjoyed a fine time. “Those present were: Elmer Potts and wife; George Rice and wife; Ira McQuinn, wife and son; Mr. Horsely and Harry Pierce and wife, all of Springfield; Guy Hinkle; Lyman Stoneburner and family of Pana; L. O. and Lawrence Stoneburner and their families. All departed at a late hour planning to have more reunions.” John M. and Margaret lived on a farm in Section 28 of Cold Spring Township–an 80 acre tract in 1930. In June of 1929 Margaret left her husband John M. She took legal action restraining him from disposing of any property and filed for separate maintenance. John M. Stoneburner died almost a year later in April, 1930. His obituary read: “John M. Stoneburner, son of Robert and Margaret Stoneburner, was born 31 Jan. 1847 Muskingum Co., Ohio and departed this life April 9,...

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Biographical Sketch of Milton Ewing

Milton, son of Frank and Rebecca Ewing, was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, October 30, 1848. He was reared in his native county, and received his education in the schools of Zanesville, Ohio. When nineteen years of age he accompanied his parents in their removal to Missouri, settling at Gallatin in 1867. He early evinced a decided interest in and preference for the law, and in 1868 began legal studies in the office of Judge R. L. Dodge, of Gallatin, continuing with Judge Dodge one year, then entered the office of Judge Samuel A. Richardson, with whom he studied until admitted to the bar in 1870. Mr. Ewing has since practiced his profession in Gallatin, and has not only earned a high place among the best practitioners at the Daviess county bar, but stands deservedly high in the esteem of the citizens of Gallatin and Daviess county. He has held the position of city attorney and city clerk of Gallatin several terms, and is now most accept-ably filling the latter position. On the 20th of February, 1872, Mr. Ewing was united in marriage to Miss Hattie, daughter of Rev. J. H. Brundige, of Gallatin. Mrs. Ewing is a zealous member of the Presbyterian church, of Gallatin. Mr. Ewing is a member of Gallatin Lodge No. 106, A. F. & A. M., and of Gallatin Chapter No. 11, R. A....

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Biography of Frank Ewing

Frank Ewing began the study of law with R. W. P. Muse, of Zanesville, Ohio, in 1856, and was admitted to the bar in 1859 by the Supreme Court of Ohio; From 1846 to 1867 he was a successful farmer in that State, and during the last nine years of his residence there held the office of justice of the peace. In 1867 he removed with his wife and two sons to Daviess county, Missouri, and located in Gallatin, where he engaged for two years in mercantile pursuits. The same year he was also enrolled as a member of the Daviess county bar. In 1870 he was elected justice of the peace, and, with the exception of an intermission of two years, has held that position ever since. He has, also, most efficiently served as supervisor of the City of Gallatin for the past ten years, and as such has had charge of all the public improvements in said city. Mr. Ewing is a man of commanding personal appearance, standing six feet high and weighing 215 pounds. He is, so far as education is concerned, a self-made man, having made himself what he is by hard study, perseverance and industry. He possesses more than average ability, and is a man of acknowledged good judgment and sound opinion. His intellect is bright and has that scope and capacity to grasp...

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Biographical Sketch of Enoch S. M. Donaldson

Enoch S. M. Donaldson, son of John H. Donaldson, was born January 19, 1840, in Muskingum County, Ohio. When Enoch was two years of age his father moved to Morgan County, Ohio. He remained with his father until he was twenty-two years of age, during which time he worked on the farm and attended school. He was engaged in fanning until 1864, when he went to Venango County, Pennsylvania, where he worked for three years. During part of this time he was employed by an oil company, and a part of the time worked at the shoemaker’s trade. He also learned to be a practical engineer, and followed that profession for a while. In 1867 he went to Morgan County, Ohio, where he remained a few months, when he went to Caldwell County, Missouri, where he was engaged in farming for several years. After this he moved to Sheridan Township in Daviess County, Missouri, where he purchased a farm and engaged in farming. In 1868 he was married to Miss Charity E. McGarvin. They have had six children: Eva, Emmet, Myrtle, Walter, Joseph and Ella...

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Blue Rock Baptist Cemetery, Blue Rock Township, Muskingum County Ohio

Junction of Roads 79 and 226 ALEXANDER Robert, 1837 – 1912 Margaret, 1833 – 1922 Dorcas A., 1872 – 1892 Mary C., 1867 – 1876 Leslie W., 1870 – 1946 ALLISON John T., 1846 – 1928 Mary P., 1859 – 1936 Infant dau., d. 3 Aug. 1898 Thomas I, d. 20 Aug. 1900, ae. 2 mos., 25 days ANDERS David, 1869 – ____ Loudema, 1867 – 1951 APPERSON Margaret J., b. 18 Nov. 1830, d. 22 May 1902 F. H., b. 24 Aug. 1828 Eli M., 1862 – 1914 Thedosia, 1872 – 1909 Infant son, 1897 – 1897 ARGO Merinda J., d. 14 Nov. 185_, ae. 19 yrs. AYRES Amos R., b. 28 Oct. 1877 Carrie A. Hazel Marie, b. 1 July 1904, d. 27 Dec. 1905 Jacob P., 1844 – 1902 Sarah J., 1842 – 1923 Sarah, d. 29 Jan. 1889, ae. 75 yrs., 1 mo., 9 days BAIJN (? Spelling) William Franklin, d. 25 Mar. 1843. Son of Wm. & Eliz. BLAIR Nancy, d. 17 Jan. 1873 BROTHERS Austin T., b. 1 Aug. 1832, d. 25 June 1915 Elizabeth, d. 26 May 1890, ae. 57 yrs., 8 mos., 26 days Emily, d. 19 May 1903, ae. 65 yrs., 10 mos., 4 days. Wife of A. T. BUCHANAN Alexander, 1829 – 1915 Margaret J. McDonald Buchanan, 1833 – 1915 Nathaniel, b. 28 Oct. 1871, d. 31 Dec. 1884...

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Biography of Boyd Elias Pollom

The men who came to Shawnee County in 1871 were of necessity patient plodders, content to await the rewards of a developing civilization. There were no short cuts to fortune such as fired the zeal of the argonauts of ’49, but there existed sane and practical opportunities for the man to whom labor was a beneflcent and necessary festure of his existence. To such a class belonged William Pollom, father of Boyd Elias Pollom, the latter one of the successful agrienlturists and substantial citizens of the vicinity of North Topeka. William Pollom was born in Ohio, in 1838, a son of Joseph Pollom, of Pennsylvania-Dutch antecedents who was a pioneer of both Ohio and Indiana. William Pollom grew up as a farmer, a vocation which he followed throughout his life, with short periods of participation in sawmilling, as timber in his community was very plentiful during his young manhood. He was married in 1856 to Ann Boyd, of Muskingum County, Ohio, and not long thereafter moved to Clay County, Indiana, and then to Putnam County, in the same state. A loyal Union man, never afrald to express his views, he enlisted in the Fifty-first Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil war and fought with that organization until wounded in battle, when he returned to Putnam County and thereafter did duty as a home guard as long as the...

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Slave Narrative of Ben Brown

Interviewer: Albert I Dugan Person Interviewed: Ben Brown Location: Keen St., Zanesville, Ohio Age: 100 Occupation: Railroad worker Yes suh I wuz a slave in Vaginyah, Alvamaul (Albermarle) county an’ I didn’t have any good life, I’m tellin’ you dat! It wuz a tough life. I don’t know how old I am, dey never told me down dere, but the folks here say I’m a hunderd yeah old an’ I spect dats about right. My fathah’s name wuz Jack Brown and’ my mammy’s Nellie Brown. Dey wuz six of us chillun, one sistah Hannah an’ three brothers, Jim, Harrison, an’ Spot. Jim wuz de oldes an’ I wuz next. We wuz born on a very lauge plantation an dey wuz lots an’ lots of other slaves, I don’t know how many. De log cabins what we live in[HW:?] on both sides de path make it look like a town. Mastah’s house wuz a big, big one an’ had big brick chimneys on de outside. It wuz a frame house, brown, an’ set way back from de road, an’ behind dat wuz de slaves’ quarters. De mastah, he wuz Fleming Moon an’ dey say he wuz cap’n in de wah of 1812. De missy wuz Parley Moon and dey had one son an fouh daughters. All us chillun an mammy live in a log cabin dat wuz lauge enuf foh...

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Biography of J. R. Esworthy

J. R. Esworthy, whose country home is on Rural Route No. 15 out of St. Joseph, has spent the greater part of his active life in Champaign County. He began here almost empty handed and that he now owns one of the larger and better improved farms of the county is a distinct tribute to his hard working industry and persistent efforts. Mr. Esworthy was born in Union County, Ohio, May 14, 1849, son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Good) Esworthy. His father was born in Maryland, of which state the grandfather was also a native. The mother was a native of Pennsylvania. J. R. Esworthy was the second of five children. He acquired his early education in a country school near Nashport in Muskingum County, Ohio. From Muskingum County the family removed to Putnam County in northwestern Ohio, then to Missouri, and finally to Illinois, locating near Potomac. It was in that locality of Vermilion County that J. R. Esworthy came to manhood, having in the meantime completed his education in the public schools and having received a classical training as a farmer and husbandman from his father. At the age of twenty he took upon himself the responsibilities of a home maker by his marriage to Miss Serena Shoaf. Mrs. Esworthy was born in Indiana, daughter of David and Catherine Shoaf. The first year after their marriage Mr....

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Biography of R. G. Morrison

R. G. Morrison. A Rantoul residence almost palatial in its architectural design, size and comforts is the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Morrison in their retired years. Mr. Morrison is a veteran of the Civil War and fought gallantly for the preservation of the Union when the nation needed his services. His industrious efforts as a farmer brought him large rewards and though he began with very modest capital he acquired one of the handsomest estates of Champaign County. Mr. Morrison was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, son of Mr. and Mrs. Abram Morrison, his father a native of Ohio and his mother of Pennsylvania. In the early days Mr. Morrison attended district schools in the vicinity of Zanesville, Ohio. The schoolhouse which stands clearest in his memory was an old log building. It had slab benches, a desk supported by pins driven into the side wall, and the instruction was as crude and limited as the furnishings of the building. Occasionally the pupils would attend school for six months in the year, though the usual term was three months. He was only eighteen years of age when he enlisted at Zanesville for service in the Union army. He became a member of the Home. Guard and was ordered with his comrades to Maryland, to Harper’s Ferry, then to Baltimore, and he did service chiefly as a...

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Biography of T. F. Berkley

T. F. Berkley, who for a number of years has been the leading flour merchant in the village of Ogden, is a miller by training and experience, as was his father before him. Mr. Berkley was born at Maxburg in Muskingum County, Ohio, a son of C. F. and C. M. (Richardson) Berkley. This branch of the Richardson family were prominent both in Ohio and Kentucky. C. F. Berkley in the early days conducted a mill on the Muskingum River, but in 1851 removed to Charleston, Illinois, when his son T. F. was only three years of age. C. F. Berkley while at Charleston became a friend of Abraham Lincoln, then a prominent Illinois lawyer, and he often met this great statesman after that and was a warm and stanch admirer of him both personally and in politics. T. F. Berkley was the youngest of five sons. On September 29, 1869, when T. F. Berkley was twenty-one years of age, he married Lydia A. Howver. She was born at West Middleburg, Ohio. After their marriage they lived for a time at Homer, Illinois, and then for twenty-seven years Mr. Berkley conducted a flour mill in Vermilion County. He also lived at Charleston, Illinois, ten years. He has conducted an extensive business as a flour and grain miller and is still active at Ogden. Three children were born to him...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert Newell

ROBERT NEWELL. – “Doc” Newell, as he was commonly called, was one of the same breed of pioneers as Jo Meek. He was, in fact, associated with the latter for many years in the wild, trapping life on the border; and when that was given up he went with the rest of the little company of trappers to Oregon and became one of the state-builders there. He was born near Zanesville, Ohio, on the 30th of March, 1807. After having spent some time in Cincinnati, in learning the saddler’s trade, he was led by his adventurous disposition to go with a trapping party, in his eighteenth year, to the Rocky Mountains. It was there that he became acquainted with Joe Meek. Te friendship of the two rough but warm-hearted trappers deepened into the closest intimacy; and in after years they stood by each other through thick and thin. Newell went with Meek, Doty, Walker, Wilkins, Ebberts and Larison, in 1840, to the Tualatin Plains, where most of the number became permanent residents. Newell himself bore an honorable part in the affairs of the growing state; and, although he had had few advantages of early education, he possessed a natural intelligence and force of character which gave him due recognition among the strong-headed men of our early epoch. He was married in 1846 to Rebecca Newman, of Marion county. In...

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Biography of Hon. Miles C. Moore

HON. MILES C. MOORE. РThe gentleman whose name gives title to this brief memoir was born April 17, 1845, in the little village of Rix Mills, Muskingum County, Ohio, where his well known and widely respected parents resided. When he was twelve years of age, the family removed to Wisconsin, where for six years he attended school at Bronson Institute, a seat of learning conducted under the auspices of the Methodist church. Inspired with a spirit of adventure, through a perusal of the explorations of Bonneville, Fr̩mont and others, and desiring to better his fortune, he resolved to brave the dangers and hardships incident to a trip across the plains and come to the Pacific coast. Accordingly, in 1863, he joined a party en route to the newly discovered gold fields in Montana. After a few weeks spent in the mines, he continued journeying westward until he reached Walla Walla. There his finances gave out. Being among strangers, the situation was not the most pleasant to contemplate. Without giving it much of a review, he sallied forth with the endeavor to secure employment without other recommendation than that which his face and general bearing would portray. Messrs. Kyger & Reese, to whom he applied, believing they recognized in him a worthy young man, gave him a clerkship in their mercantile house. So well did he fulfill his part,...

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Biography of John M. Silcott

Almost forty years have passed since John M. Silcott took up his residence in Idaho, and he is therefore one of the oldest and most widely known pioneers of the state. He came in the spring of 1860 to establish the government Indian agency at Lapwai, and has since been identified with the growth and development of this section. He is a Virginian, his birth having occurred in Loudoun County, of the Old Dominion, January 14, 1824. His French and Scotch ancestors were early settlers there, and during the Revolution and the war of 18 12 representatives of the family loyally served their country on the field of battle. William Silcott, the father of our subject, married Sarah Violet, a lady of Scotch ancestry, and about 1828 they removed with the family to Zanesville, Ohio, where the father engaged in business as a contractor and builder. He was liberal in his religious views, and his wife held the faith of the Presbyterian Church. His political support was given the Whig party and the principles advocated by Henry Clay. Only two children of the family of five are now living, the sister being Sarah T., who married Captain Abrams, of Brownsville, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Abrams now makes her home in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1845 the family removed to St. Louis, where both the parents died. Mr. Silcott received a common-school education...

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