Location: Muncie Indiana

Slave Narrative of Rosa Barber

Interviewer: William Webb Tuttle Person Interviewed: Rosa Barber Location: Muncie, Indiana Place of Birth: North Carolina Date of Birth: 1861 Place of Residence: 812 South Jefferson Muncie, Indiana Submitted by: William Webb Tuttle District No. 2 Muncie, Indiana SLAVES IN DELAWARE COUNTY ROSA BARBER 812 South Jefferson Muncie, Indiana Rosa Barber was born in slavery on the Fox Ellison plantation at North Carden[TR:?], in North Carolina, in the year 1861. She was four [HW: ?] years old when freed, but had not reached the age to be of value as a slave. Her memory is confined to that short childhood there and her experiences of those days and immediately after the Civil War must be taken from stories related to her by her parents in after years, and these are dimly retained. Her maiden name was Rosa Fox Ellison, taken as was the custom, from the slave-holder who held her as a chattel. Her parents took her away from the plantation when they were freed and lived in different localities, supported by the father who was now paid American wages. Her parents died while she was quite young and she married Fox Ellison, an ex-slave of the Fox Ellison plantation. His name was taken from the same master as was hers. She and her husband lived together forty-three years, until his death. Nine children were born to them of...

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Slave Narrative of Betty Guwn

Interviewer: William Webb Tuttle Person Interviewed: Betty Guwn Location: Muncie, Indiana Place of Birth: Kentucky Date of Birth: March 25, 1832 Place of Residence: 1101 East Second Street Muncie, Indiana Submitted by: William Webb Tuttle District No. 2 Muncie, Indiana NEGRO SLAVES IN DELAWARE COUNTY MRS. BETTY GUWN MRS. HATTIE CASH, DAUGHTER, residing at 1101 East Second Street Muncie, Indiana Mrs. Betty Guwn was born March 25, 1832, as a slave on a tobacco plantation, near Canton, Kentucky. It was a large plantation whose second largest product was corn. She was married while quite young by the slave method which was a form of union customary between the white masters. If the contracting parties were of different plantations the masters of the two estates bargained and the one sold his rights to the one on whose plantation they would live. Her master bought her husband, brought him and set them up a shack. Betty was the personal attendant of the Mistress. The home was a large Colonial mansion and her duties were many and responsible. However, when her house duties were caught up her mistress sent her immediately to the fields. Discipline was quite stern there and she was “lined up” with the others on several occasions. Her cabin home began to fill up with children, fifteen in all. The ventilation was ample and the husband would shoot a...

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Biography of Abraham Buckles Jetmore

Abraham Buckles Jetmore. The late Abraham Buckles Jetmore was one of the most forceful figures of the Kansas bar from the year 1878 until his death, March 1, 1908. During that period he gave his strength, mind, heart and talents to the upbuilding of his adopted city and state, and while engaged in discharging the duties related to a large and important practice, gave his best efforts to the cause of prohibition and toward the establishment of an honest public administration. Mr. Jetmore was born at Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana, May 25, 1837, the seventh son of John Isaac and Mary (Brannon) Jetmore. His father was born in Prussia and was educated at Frankfort-on-Main, Germany, and came to America when eighteen years of age. His mother was the daughter of a Revolutionary soldier, John Brannon, and his wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Haborn (also sometimes spelled Haburn and Haighbourgne). The Brannons were Lrish and direct descendants from the Brannon family of Irish kings, this family being able to trace its ancestry back to the year 745. Abraham B. Jetmore received his early education in the public schools of his native city, and in order to secure funds with which to complete his training taught school for several years. Thus he was enabled to attend the Muncie (Indiana) Seminary, from which he was duly graduated, and in...

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Biography of A. C. Shaffer

A. C. Shaffer. Necessary requisites of a good newspaper man in these modern days are trained faculties and an enlightened understanding. The world at large, in greater and greater degree is requiring educated men, not alone for the learned professions, but also for those along less trained lines, and it is an important part of the work of the newspapers throughout the country to furnish the mental stimulus without which none can hope to succeed. Particularly does this apply to the newspapers which circulate through the smaller cities and in the country districts, and one of the papers which had accepted and is carrying out this work is the Tri-City Herald, of Gas City, Kansas, the proprietor of which, A. C. Shaffer, is not only a man of broad information and progressive spirit, but a newspaper man of long experience, who had gained his training through all the departments of newspaper work. Mr. Shaffer was born at Muncie, Indiana, September 21, 1878, and is a son of Noah and Charlotte (Longenecker) Shaffer. The Shaffer family originated in Germany and was founded in Pennsylvania during colonial days. In that state was born the grandfather of A. C. Shaffer, who was a minister of the Universalist Church and died at Dayton, Ohio, at the remarkable age of one hundred and two years. Noah Shaffer was born in 1832, at Dayton, Ohio,...

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Biography of Prof. Charles Russell Paine

Prof. Charles Russell Paine, of Redlands, is a native of Massachusetts, born in Barnstable September 9, 1839, a son of John and Lucy (Crowell) Paine. He is one of a family of six children. He was graduated at Amherst College, and has taught in Maine, Rhode Island, Ohio, Indiana and California. He came to this latter State in 1870 and taught school in Riverside. He also taught the first school in Colton. In 1873 he established a private school in San Bernardino and in 1876 was elected County Superintendent of Schools. He subsequently served as principal of the city schools two terms. Prof. Paine and his father-in-law, Dr. Craig, came to California to raise fruit in Riverside. They drove from Los Angeles and took up eighty acres of barren land, on which they built rude houses, and then went back to Los Angeles for their families, and theirs were the first families to live on the lower plain. The Professor tells an amusing incident which occurred just as they were crossing the Santa Ana river, how that his brother-in-law, Scipio Craig, now editor of the Citrograph, fell out of the wagon into the water. Also, how later he and Scipio had raised a crop of corn on the island in the river, and when it was almost ready to gather the Mexican cattle invaded the corn and barley, and...

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Biography of William Craig, M. D.

William Craig, M. D., Redlands, was born in Pennsylvania, January 2, 1818. His father, Samuel Craig, was a tanner and farmer, and moved to Clark County, Ohio, in 1819. Our subject attended the common schools of Clark County, and in 1848 graduated at the Starling Medical College, at Columbus, Ohio. He then practiced medicine in Shelby County three years, and in Auglaize County three years. The five years following this he practiced in Winchester, Indiana, where he also carried on a drug business. Then he went to Muncie, Indiana, where he engaged in the drug business and practiced medicine for ten years. Then he successfully engaged in the baking powder business for some two years. In October, 1870, he moved to California, and was one of the first settlers in Riverside, where he pre-empted eighty acres of land and plowed the first furrow ever plowed there. He also built the first hotel in Riverside, and carried on the hotel business for about seven years, or until his hotel was burned. He, having previously purchased 108 acres of fine land three miles east of Redlands, has a magnificent country residence and as fine a vineyard as there is in the valley; also, 500 orange trees in full bearing. Dr. Craig has been twice married; first at Muncie, Indiana, March 30, 1838, to Joanna Moore. In six months she died, and...

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Benson, John J., III – Obituary

John J. Benson III, 60, of Muncie, Ind., died Oct. 13, 2002, at Williamsburg Village. A private memorial service will be scheduled later. Mr. Benson was born at Camden, N.J., the son of Virginia Campbell Benson and John J. Benson II. He taught at Royerton Elementary School and was a U.S. Air Force veteran. His memberships included St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church and the Isanogel Center, where he had been on the board of directors. Survivors include his wife of 35 years, Marianne Hardtke Benson; two sons, Dr. Sean Benson, who has a dental office in Baker City, and Brett Benson and his fiancee, Kathryn Wood, of Chicago; his mother-in-law, Doris Hardtke of Mapleton, Minn.; and an aunt, Betty Benson of Fort Myers, Fla. He was preceded in death by his parents. Memorial contributions may be made to the John J. Benson III, scholarship fund, through The Old National Bank, 110 E. Main St., Muncie, IN 47305 or to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, 7301 Georgetown, No. 112, Indianapolis, IN 46268. The Meeks Mortuary of Muncie, Ind., is in charge of arrangements. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, October 25, 2002 Transcribed by: Belva...

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Biography of Herbert K. Lindsley

Herbert K. Lindsley. Recognized as one of the leading commercial centers of the West, the City of Wichita has advanced rapidly in recent years along particular lines. Its geographical location and railroad facilities have made it the largest market in the world for broom corn. In the handling of broom corn, an important figure is Herbert K. Lindsley, president of the American Warehouse Company, whose career is typical of modern progress and advancement. It is not necessary to seek far for the reason for his success, or his indefatigable energy, close application and progressive methods have not only laid the foundation for the enterprise which he has built up, but have led him into other lines of endeavor, in which he has attained equal recognition and reward. Mr. Lindsley was born at Muncie, Indiana, June 21, 1875. When he was three years of age he was taken by his parents to Sterling, Kansas, where he received his education, and after graduating from the high school of that place, clerked for three years and for a few years thereafter was agent for the Pacific Express Company at Sterling. He then engaged in the broom corn business at Sterling, that town being at the time the largest broom corn market in the West. In 1904 he came to Wichita, where he was the first to engage in the broom corn business,...

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