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Location: Multnomah County OR

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Leo J. Flanagan

Dr. Leo J. Flanagan, one of the county’s well-known physicians and surgeons, is located in South San Francisco where he has been practicing for the past year. Before moving into this county Dr. Flanagan had a large practice in San Francisco. Dr. Flanagan is another of the young professional men who has been attracted to San Mateo County by the wonderful opportunities that the future holds. He sees a great period of growth and prosperity ahead for South San Francisco and his confidence in this era of development was such that he gave up a flourishing practice in San Francisco to come into this territory comparatively unknown and establish himself. Dr. Flanagan is a native of California. He was born at Napa on August 6, 1885 where he took the first steps in preparation for his professional career. After graduating from Santa Clara College Dr. Flanagan finished the medical course at Johnstown University at Washington, D. C. For several years he was resident physician at St. Mary’s Hospital and Mary’s Help Hospital in San Francisco and was also with the San Francisco emergency service. Dr. Flanagan has many fraternal connections. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Eagles, the Redmen and the Foresters. He was married in Portland in...

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Keith, Lyall – Obituary

Lyall Keith of Box 300, Walton, passed away February 9, 1970 at the age of 66. He was born November 13, 1903 in Portland, Oregon and had resided in Lane County for the past 31 years. He was united in marriage to Edith Bilyeu, December 24, 1930 in Albany, Oregon. Besides his wife, he is survived by a half brother, Gordon Keith of Eureka, California; several aunts and uncles. He was a member of the Eugene Moose Lodge. Funeral services will be held in the Poole-Larsen Chapel Thursday, February 12th at 3 p.m. with private cremation to follow. [Interment Pine Grove Cemetery] Eugene Register-Guard, February 10, 1970 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Bean, Ormond Robert – Obituary

Retired Portland City Commissioner Ormond R. Bean, 89, a 31-year servant in city, state and federal governments, died early Friday morning [February 14, 1975] in the Parkview Nursing Home. Death was due to natural causes, said his son, Ormond Bean, Jr. First elected to the Portland City Council in 1932, the elder Bean served from 1933 until 1939 when he was appointed Oregon Public Utility Commissioner. From 1943 until 1946, Mr. Bean was a transportation director in America’s World War II effort, serving in Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the Middle East. Returning to Portland, he was elected once more to the City Council, serving from 1949 until his retirement in 1967. A former Portland City Hall employee, when asked why she considered Ormond R. Bean as her favorite city commissioner, said it was because “he was a man who never lost his temper nor raised his voice.” The description aptly summed up Bean who also had a long-standing reputation for his honest and integrity. He was often referred to as “the financial watchdog of City Hall.” Bean, who died early Friday at the age of 89, was once described as “the best public servant Portland ever had,” by Mark Grayson, a longtime colleague on the council. Grayson, who retired in 1970, served as Bean’s administrative assistant before running for the commission. “Ormond was a great gentleman and a fine...

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Kryger, Nevada L. Morrow – Obituary

Requiem mass for Mrs. Nevada L. Kryger, 73, resident of the Sellwood community for 60 years, will be held at 9 a.m. Friday in St. Agatha Catholic Church. Interment will be in Mount Calvary Cemetery. Rosary will be said today at 8 p.m. in McGinnis & Wilhelm Chapel. She was a native of Lewis County, Washington. Survivors are her husband, Cornelius J. Kryger, whom she married 46 years ago; daughter, Mrs. Alice Katherine Jones; a grandson, and sisters, Mrs. Irene Nolton and Mrs. Nellie Miller, all of Portland. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Portland Oregon’s Ships and Commerce

Many vessels crossed the bar of the Columbia in 1849 and a number came up to Portland. Of these none was more serviceable than the Madonna, from New York, under Captain Couch. This was his third trip out, and by far the most successful. His cargo of mixed goods was disposed of in part at San Francisco, his lumber selling for $600 per thousand. On board were W. S. Ogden, a prominent merchant of early times, and G. H. Flanders, a sea captain, before this in the employ of John and Caleb Cushing. Capt. Flanders is a man whose energy and enterprise have done much for Portland’s commerce. Reaching the city once more, Couch had his land surveyed and platted. It is said that in laying off a street he gave his half for the use of the public, but Stark refused to meet him half way; thus making A street but half width. It is also reported that upon the surveyor finishing the job, worth about $700, Couch offered him for his pay, two blocks on Second and Third streets-which were refused. The Madonna was run on the route to San Francisco by Flanders, and the firm of Couch & Co. were so prosperous as to be able to dispatch in 1850 the brig Emma Preston to China-the first from Oregon to China. The unfavorable condition of steam navigation, already mentioned, which supplied Milwaukie...

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Biography of Hon. Peter Paquet

HON. PETER PAQUET – This pioneer of 1852, who is the son of F.X. Paquet and Marie Louise Lannadier de Langdeau, was born in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, on the 13th of January, 1839. He received an education in the private and public schools of St. Louis. In the spring of 1852 he left the city of St. Louis with his parents, who had determined to emigrate to Oregon, the family then consisting of father, mother and six children. They came up the Missouri river on the old steamer Timour No. 2, and in eight days reached the town of St. Joseph, where they completed the outfit. Sometime in the month of May, with their ox-teams and wagons laden with the provisions for the trip, they took their lives and fortunes in their hands, and started to cross the great American desert, known as the plains. They pursued their journey without particular incident or accident, barring the usual sickness and privations which were the lot of most of the emigrants of that year, until they reached the crossing of Snake river. Here some rascally traders had established themselves for the purpose of swindling the tired emigrant, and buying the running gear of his wagons, after persuading him that he could get into a boat, conjured out of an old wagon-bed caulked up tight with rags, and that...

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Biographical Sketch of George W. Cawlfield

This worthy gentleman is to be numbered with the younger men of Harney county who have attained a good success in the stock business here and who bid fair to gain much better in the future, judging by their faithful and wisely bestowed labors of the past. George W. was born in Johnson county, Kansas, on October 21, 1870, being the son of David A. and Abigil (Evans) Cawlfield. The father was a native of Tennessee, and went across the plains to California in an early day and then returned via Panama, after which for some time he acted as government freighter on the frontiers and finally settled in Kansas. In 1874 the family came overland to Pueblo county, Colorado, and there the father followed stock raising. In 1888 the father, with his wife and ten children, came by covered wagons to Harney and settled on Rye Grass flat, east from Burns, and there engaged in raising stock. Our subject attended schools in various places of his residence, and in 1891 he went to Portland and acted as express messenger and baggageman to two different points on the O. R. & N. This continued for two years, and he returned to Harney county, and there, on November 24, 1897, he married Miss Hattie, daughter of Jesse O. and Emma Bunyard. To them have been born two children -Gladys R.,...

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Biographical Sketch of N. E. Duncan

It is with pleasure that we are enabled to write concerning the estimable gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, since he has been one of the potent factors in the development of Harney county, has manifested wisdom and enterprise in all his ways here, has labored as a true pioneer in many other sections of the country and has always manifested the same unswerving integrity, moral uprightness and sound principles, having sustained a reputation as an exceptionally reliable man, and ever arraigned on the side of right. Mr. Duncan was born in Williamson county, Illinois, on March 27, 1838, being the son of Dudley W. and Elizabeth Duncan. On April 16, 1859, Mr. Duncan started to New Orleans on the Panama route to California. He had an adventurous spirit and was ready to grapple with the hard problems of pioneer life and has since proved himself of the right kind of stuff. He stopped five days on the way, at Havana, and then landed in San Francisco on May 16. He worked for wages until the fall of 1861, then went by steamer to Portland, Oregon. On April 16, 1863, he started to Auburn, Baker county, arriving there on the 16th of May, and for fifteen years he was numbered with the hardy and worthy miners of that vicinity. It was 1878 that he came to...

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Biography of Hon. Peter G. Stewart

HON. PETER G. STEWART. – Peter Grant Stewart was born on the 6th of September, 1809, in Stanford, Delaware County, New York. When eight years of age he moved to Jefferson, Scohane County, where he received a common-school education, and learned the trade of a watchmaker. He followed the occupation of watchmaker and jeweler in Middlebury until the spring of 1838, when, with a selected stock of watches, jewelry, etc., he started for the West, going by way of Niagara Falls, Buffalo, Toledo and Fort Wayne to Mount Vernon, Indiana, and from there to Morganfield, Union County, Kentucky, where he located, working at his trade until fall. From Morganfield he traveled down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, stopping at the principal points for the purpose of trade, arriving in due time at New Orleans. From there his route took him to Mobile, Mariawa, Jackson County, Florida, Columbus, Georgia, Clarksville and Pendleton, South Carolina. There he was taken sick, and returned to New York. Having recovered his health, in January, 1840, he went to Kentucky, and in the spring to Springfield, Missouri. On the 1st of September, 1842, he was married to Miss Rebecca R. Cason. During the year 1842 he was appointed brigade paymaster by General Smith. Having made the necessary preparations during the winter, on or about the 17th of April, 1843, he left Springfield, Missouri, in company...

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Biography of James P. Stephens

JAMES P. STEPHENS. – This original owner of a large portion of the townsite of East Portland, Oregon, was born in 1806 in Virginia, and removed to Indiana when but a boy of eight, and came still farther west to Hancock County, Illinois, in1832. In 1830 he married Miss Elizabeth Walker of Ohio, and passed on to Missouri, and in 1843 made preparations to come to Oregon. Failing, however, to reach the rendezvous in time, the journey was postponed until the next year. Crossing the plains in 1844, he endured the hardships of that toilsome year, and reached Oregon City as late as December 24th. The year following he bought a squatters right to the site of East Portland, which was held by Doctor McLoughlin as administrator of one Porier, a Frenchman. Living there and working at cooperage for the Hudson’s Bay Company, Mr. Stephens availed himself of the Donation land law to secure his claim, thereby acquiring a property which stood him in stead during all his vicissitudes. As early as 1846 he established a ferry between East and West Portland, using a simple flatboat propelled with oars, and with this passed the few horsemen and occasional teams that traveled in those days to and fro. In that year he also laid out the city of East Portland. In 1848 he, with all the rest of the Oregonians,...

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Biography of Robert Wilson Morrison

ROBERT WILSON MORRISON. – This leading pioneer of the immigration of 1844 was born March 14, 1811, in Fleming County, Kentucky, of Scotch parentage. In 1822 he moved with his parents to Montgomery County, Missouri, living with them until his marriage in 1831, to Miss Nancy Irwin. Two years later a move was made to Clay County, and thence to Clinton County, on the border of the territory occupied by the Indians of the plains. Upon the consummation of the “Platte purchase,” he moved with his family into that frontier region, and for six years lived in Andrew County. The excitement and interest in respect to Oregon was then, in 1843-44, reaching a high pitch among the people of the frontier; and in that particular neighborhood the Oregon fever was still further inflamed by letters from a man named Smith, formerly of that section, but then in Oregon, who was urging his people to come to the land by the Pacific Ocean. Indeed, all information obtainable was found to be favorable to Oregon; and, in time for the trip next season, Mr. Morrison was among the number who were armed, equipped and well prepared for the march across the plains. His wife and six children were of course to accompany him; and there were two young men taken into the family as fellow-travelers, – John Minto and Willard H....

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Biography of Rev. Jesse Moreland

REV. JESSE MORELAND. – But few, if any, stand higher socially, morally or in the estimation of their neighbors and friends than the grand man whose name calls forth this brief pen-and-ink sketch. We do not attempt to give the likeness of the man drawn from opinion. Our purpose is to sketch what he is in a few selected facts from his life. With this intention, what we have essayed to give to the public will furnish an instance of the influence of piety and industry, united with sound common-sense, in giving a noble character a distinguished position and eminent usefulness. His name is a synonym for all that is true and honorable in a man. The early settlers of Oregon, as well as others of more recent date, honor the name of Jesse Moreland for his liberality, hospitality, and absolute and uncorruptible integrity. His clear and discriminating mind, impartial judgement, strong, practical good sense, and a profound and instinctive sense of right and wrong, patience in investigation, and a sincere, earnest desire to reach just and correct conclusions, lead to the inevitable conviction that, had he sought position in public life, he would have been pre-eminently a christian statesman; and a christian statesman is the glory of his country. We find him like many of America’s noblemen, – rising from a humble origin, without artificial aid, and with...

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Biography of Captain Z. C. Norton

CAPTAIN Z.C. NORTON. – Of the early pioneers to Oregon who were natives of the Pine Tree state, the subject of this sketch occupied a prominent place during his life. He was born in Farmington, Maine, December 29, 1808, and when fourteen years of age was sent to sea by his father for the purpose of learning navigation, and gaining possible promotion to the captaincy of a vessel. His patron was an old friend of his parents, and was the commander of the vessel in which our subject began his travels on the briny deep. By close attention to the duties of his calling, he rapidly rose in the estimation of shipowners, and on the arrival of his majority was given the command of a vessel. In 1833 he was married to Miss Caroline Norton, and took his bride on board of his vessel; and for ten years its cabin was their home. during that time he was in the European and West India trade, and by his energetic management and business tact accumulated sums sufficient to purchase an interest at different times in various vessels. In 1847 he built the brig Sequin, and in her made several trips to the West Indies and to South American ports. While in the latter trade there occurred the circumstances which brought about his coming to the Pacific coast, and his subsequent...

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Biography of Sigmund Sichel

SIGMUND SICHEL. – America is made up of the most intelligent and energetic people from all parts of the world. It is those who are alert and keen in the pursuit of information who learn of the advantages to be found in this country. And it is those who feel the impulse to stretch their limbs and operate upon a larger scale of life than the opportunities the old world afford who undergo the labors and take the risks involved in a removal across the Atlantic. This rule, which is not without its exception, is exemplified in the career of the man whose name appears at the head of this sketch. He is at present one of the active business men of Portland, Oregon, and while at Goldendale, Washington Territory, enjoyed the reputation of being the youngest man ever elected to the office of mayor in any city in the Northwest. He was born in Bavaria in 1857, and prior to his fifteenth birthday was at school in a commercial college acquiring the information and training which have made him so efficient in his line in our state. He came to America at that age, and the second day after his arrival engaged as a salesman in a New York store; but, learning of Oregon and the opportunities here for independence and competence, he determined to seek his fortune...

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Biography of Hon. George A. Steel

HON. GEORGE A. STEEL. – The subject of this sketch was born in Stafford, Ohio, on April 22, 1846. Coming to Portland in 1863, he soon received an appointment to a clerkship in the Portland postoffice. Afterwards, accepting the secretaryship of the old Oregon Iron Works, he gave such satisfaction that Ladd & Tilton offered him a situation as accountant in their bank, a position which he held for five years. In 1870 he was elected treasurer of Multnomah county, a place he filled with general approval. During the first year of his official life, he and J.K. gill purchased the book and stationery business of Harris & Holman; and for many years the firm of Gill & Steel, in spite of the rather unpromising name, won golden opinions throughout the country as one of the most thoroughly reliable in the metropolis. They increased their business by the purchase of the rival firm of Bancroft & Morse, Mr. Bancroft becoming a member of the firm. The business having reached great magnitude, Mr. Steel bought out his partners, and conducted the business himself under the name of G.A. Steel & Company. In 1872, having invested heavily in real estate, he became financially embarrassed, but with the high sense of honor characteristic of him made no assignment disadvantageous to his creditors, but met his obligations dollar for dollar. From this severe...

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