Location: Mound City Kansas

Biography of Col. James Montgomery

Col. James Montgomery, one of the free-state leaders in Kansas and an officer in the Civil war, was a native of Ashtabula County, where he was born in 1814, and was a cousin of the hero of Quebec. In 1837 he went to Kentucky, where he taught school. He moved to Pike County, Missouri, with his family, in 1852, and a year later located in Jackson County in order to be ready to enter Kansas as soon as the territory was organized and the lands opened to settlement. Some of his friends, among whom was Doctor Thornton, knowing him to be opposed to slavery, persuaded him to go to Bates County, Mo., by telling him that he could obtain as good land there as he could in Kansas. He accepted their advice, but quickly became dissatisfied and, returning to Kansas in 1854, purchased a claim from a proslavery settler about five miles from the present town of Mound City. It was not long until he was recognized as a leader by the free-state men of that locality. In 1857 he organized and commanded the “Self-Protective Company,” which had been formed to defend the rights of the anti-slavery settlers, and backed by this company Montgomery ordered some of the most rabid pro-slavery citizens to leave the territory. After their departure, he settled down to improve his claim, but later in...

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Biography of Charles R. Jennison, Dr.

Dr. Charles R. Jennison, of Leavenworth, a brigadier general during the Civil war and afterward a leader in the public affairs of the state, was born in Jefferson County, New York, June 6, 1834. When he was twelve years old he moved with his parents to Wisconsin, and at the age of nineteen years he began to study medicine. After completing his medical course he practiced for a short time in Wisconsin and then came to Kansas, settling at Osawatomie in 1857. Within a short time he moved to Mound City, where he remained for three years, and then went to Leavenworth. Doctor Jennison was one of John Brown’s stanch supporters. Governor Robinson commissioned him captain of the Mound City Guards on February 19, 1861, and on September 4th he was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, which became known as “Jennison’s Jayhawkers,” being assigned to the command of the western border of Missouri with headquarters at Kansas City. He determined to clear the border of guerrillas, and his a ccess in that military undertaking was such that General Hunter appointed him acting brigadier general, and he was placed in command of “all the troops in Kansas west of and on the Neosho.” At the time of the Lawrence massacre Governor Carney called upon Jennison to raise a regiment, of which he was made colonel on October...

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Biography of Dr. Leonidas Kirby

In performing the arduous labors of the general medical practitioner,┬áDr. Leonidas Kirby has been very conscientious in the discharge of his professional duties, is well up to the times in medical lore, and has the intelligence to properly apply his knowledge. As evidence of his skill and ability to adapt himself to circumstances, when he first commenced the practice of medicine, a child of G. J. Howells accidentally got a grain of corn in its windpipe and was in a dying condition from the same. Dr. Kirby met the father with his child in the street and performed the operation of cutting open the windpipe (tracheotomy), thus saving the child’s life. He has become one of the foremost practitioners of the State, and the people of Boone County, Arkansas, are fortunate in having him as a citizen of their section. The Doctor was born on the Greene and Polk County, Missouri, line December 1, 1850, the eldest child of B. F. and Serena (Bender) Kirby, the former of whom was born in Warren County, Kentucky, about 1828, a son of Tully C. and Nancy C. (Harrington) Kirby. The grandfather was also born in Warren County, November 11, 1802, his parents having been Jesse and Sophia (Choice) Kirby, the former being a Virginian and a son of David and Elizabeth (Torrent) Kirby, Virginians also. The founder of the family came...

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Biography of Thomas E. Trigg

Thomas E. Trigg. “A map of busy life” mused the poet Cowper more than a hundred years ago, over his newspaper. The description yet holds good, a century of existence only having widened its field and strengthened its power. With its modern perfected machinery for the garnering of news, and with its vivid portrayal of the world’s happenings, it is, indeed, a map of swiftly passing events, one that had become a necessary vitalizing element and an indispensable factor of every day living. How surely the development of a newspaper in a community marks the latter’s progress. A name well known in journalism in Kansas, is that of Trigg, and a worthy bearer of this honored name is found in the owner and proprietor of the Elgin Journal, Thomas E. Trigg, who had been identified with newspaper work for more than a quarter of a century. Thomas E. Trigg was born at Albia, Iowa, September 15, 1862. His parents were William Allen and Mary Elizabeth (Ware) Trigg, the latter of whom died at Garnett, Kansas, in 1901. The paternal grandfather, Thomas E. Trigg, was born in Virginia, of remote Irish ancestry, in 1809, and died in Linn County, Kansas, in 1891. His people had been early and substantial settlers in Kentucky, and Trigg County, in that state, commemorates their importance. Prior to the Civil war, Thomas E. Trigg was...

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Biography of David C. Johnson

David C. Johnson in his business career had been identified with the City of Eureka and had been a factor in affairs there for over a quarter of a century. He is one of the expert men in that field in real estate and related lines of business and is manager of the Eureka Mortgage Company. Mr. Johnson had lived in Kansas since early boyhood. He was born at Effingham, Illinois, February 20, 1860. The Johnson family became identified with Illinois when it was a territory and in fact when that place was marked off as a distinct section of Northwest Territory under the name County of Illinois. His paternal ancestors came out of England and were colonial settlers in Virginia. Mr. Johnson’s grandfather, Arthur L. Johnson, was born in Illinois in 1801. He grew up in that state, became a minister of the Methodist Church and was a contemporary of such evangelists and missionaries as Peter Cartwright. For many years he lived retired from the arduous work of his profession and died at Effingham, Illinois, in 1880. He married Miss Gammon, who was also a native of Illinois and died at Effingham. David W. Johnson, father of David C., was born in Illinois in 1824. He grew up and married in his native state and became a physician by profession, though he afterwards exchanged the work of that...

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Biography of John Ellsworth Wiley

John Ellsworth Wiley, a prominent lawyer of Mound City, had been a resident of Kansas for half a century and during his active life had made himself useful both in the field of education and in that of the law and had attained no small degree of success and honor in his chosen vocation. Mr. Wiley was born on a farm in Knox County, Missouri, November 20, 1861, son of Elijah Perry and Amy Jane (Shahan) Wiley. The Wiley family had the spirit of pioneers and have lived successively on various frontiers of advancing civilization. Elijah P. Wiley was born in Hancock County, Indiana, in 1836, when all that country was raw and new. His parents were Wilford W. and Mary (Carter) Wiley, both natives of Kentucky. In 1844 the Wiley family moved to Knox County, Missouri, and took a home in what was then a rough and primitive community. The grandparents both died there. Elijah Wiley was reared on a farm, had only a common school education and made farming his chief business in life. It was in 1867 that he came to Kansas and joined the very early settlers in Crawford County, where he bought land and where he continued farming, meeting with a fair degree of success, until his death July 19, 1904. He was an old line republican and for many years served as justice...

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