Location: Morris County KS

Yeakley, Ralph P. – Obituary

Funeral services for Ralph P. Yeakley, a senior citizen at St. Elizabeth hospital, 80 years of age will be conducted at 2 p.m. Tuesday, September 19 at West and Co. Memorial Chapel. The Rev. Joe Jewett of the First Christian Church will officiate. Interment will follow at Mt. Hope Cemetery. Mr. Yeakley was born April 8, 1887 at Dunlap, Kansas, the son of Isaac and Rosa Druman Yeakley. With his family, he came across the plains from Kansas to Oregon in a covered wagon when only a small child. He has lived in Baker and Baker County for the past 72 years. Hs mother and father died when he was a young boy and he was reared by Abe and Lulu Sullivan. He was a long time rancher in the Bridgeport area and was married to his wife, Gladys Coyle Yeakley in Baker on November 7, 1907. He is survived by his daughter, Grace Hurse of Baker, five granddaughter, Virginia Wright, Theora Hambleton, Helen Alexander, all of Baker and Evelyn Greenwood of Union; a grandson Leslie Hurse of Pendleton; a brother, Clifford Yeakley and a sister, Gladys Hardesty both of Baker; and ten great grandchildren. Source: Baker Democrat Herald, Baker City, Oregon, September 18, 1967, page...

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Kansa Tribe

Kansa Indians. A southwestern Siouan tribe; one of the five, according to Dorsey’s arrangement, of the Dhegiha group. Their linguistic relations are closest with the Osage, and are close with the Quapaw. In the traditional migration of the group, after the Quapaw had first separated therefrom, the main body divided at the month of Osage River, the Osage moving up that stream and the Omaha and Ponca crossing Missouri River and proceeding northward, while the Kansa ascended the Missouri on the south side to the mouth of Kansas River. Here a brief halt was made, after which they ascended the Missouri on the south side until they reached the present north boundary of Kansas, where they were attacked by the Cheyenne and compelled to retrace their steps. They settled again at the month of Kansas River, where the Big Knives, as they called the whites, came with gifts and induced them to go farther west. The native narrators of this tradition give an account of about 20 villages occupied successively along Kansas River before the settlement at Council Grove, Kansas, whence they were finally removed to their reservation in Indian Territory. Marquette’s autograph map, drawn probably as early as 1674, places the Kansa a considerable distance directly west of the Osage and some distance south of the Omaha, indicating that they were then out Kansas River. The earliest recorded...

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Biography of Frank J. Murray

Frank J. Murray. Among the important business houses of Scottsville, Kansas, is the Fitzgerald Lumber Company, the efficient manager of which is Frank J. Murray, a member of one of the old pioneer families of the state, one that still owned the homestead secured many years ago. Frank J. Murray was born in Cloud County, Kansas, not far from Jamestown. His parents were Patrick and Mary Murray, of Irish extraction. They came to Kansas in 1869 and were among the first settlers to locate near Parkerville. In 1872 they took up a homestead and through industry and perseverance Patrick Murray developed an excellent farm. As with other Kansas pioneers, hardships and discouragements were many for a time, but Mr. Murray was an industrious, thrifty man, one who attended strictly to business and he prospered under conditions that a less determined one might have found impossible. Mr. Murray died at his home in 1911, leaving many behind to mourn, a large family and numerous friends who remembered that he was ever willing to help a neighbor over a rough place in life if he could do so. He was a faithful member of the Roman Catholic Church. His widow still lives on the old homestead. They had twelve children born to them, ten after coming to Kansas, and nine are yet living. Frank J. Murray was reared on the home...

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Oliver, Arrena Brown Runft Karp Mrs. – Obituary

Arrena Runft Karp Oliver, 95, of Boise and former Baker City resident, died April 18, 2003 at her home. At Arrena’s request, no services will be held, but there will be a gathering to celebrate her life at the Hillcrest Country Club, 4610 Hillcrest Drive in Boise at 2 p.m. on Friday, May 2. Arrangements are by Summers Funeral Homes, Boise Chapel. Born on Oct. 9, 1907, she was the eldest of four children of John and Elisabeth “Bessie” McIlvain Brown of Council Grove, Kan. She grew up on the family farm homesteaded by her great-grandparents James and Mary McIlvain in the Big John area on the Neosho River in Morris County, Kan. She grew up in the bosom of an extended family of many generations of related homesteaders and particularly enjoyed the frequent gatherings and Christmas festivities, which often were centered at the home of her grandfather John McIlvain. Always a good student, she took the state teacher’s exam upon graduation from high school in 1925, qualified, attended summer school in Emporia State Teacher’s College, and started teaching grade school in a country school when she was 17 years old. She taught at various grade schools in Kansas and continued her education at Ottawa University and the University of Kansas. She remained a teacher throughout her life, whether teaching in school or requiring proper grammar of her children...

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Biographical Sketch of A. A. Barrick

He was one of the representative business men of Battle Creek, Ida County, Ia., since 1881. In 1878, he married Hannah Gillmore of Jackson County, Iowa. They had two children: Roy and Archie. He is a native of Chicago, Illinois, born June 5, 1852, son of William and Elizabeth Barrick, natives of England. When A. A. was a year old, his father moved to Clinton County, Ia., and on a farm he grew to manhood. He served an apprenticeship to the blacksmith’s trade and was engaged in business on the Maquoketa road one year. He engaged in blacksmithing in Morris County, Ks., for 3 years. In 1881, he came to Battle Creek to do blacksmithing and in 1889 he opened up a stock of farming implements. He had Caultmen threshers and Goodhue and Globe windmills. He had been a member of the City Council 6...

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