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Location: Morgan County IL

Biographical Sketch of William Brownell Sanders

Sanders, William Brownell; lawyer; born, Cleveland, O., Sept., 1854; son of William D. and Cornelia R. (Smith) Sanders; A. B., Illinois College, 1873, A. M., LL. B., Albany Law School, 1875; married Annie E. Otis, of Cleveland, April 30, 1884; Judge Court of Common Pleas, 1888-1890; resigned; member firm Squire, Sanders & Dempsey, Cleveland, since 1890; vice pres. Society for Savings; director Guardian Trust Co., National Commercial Bank, Cleveland Stone Co., Kelly Island Lime Co., etc. Clubs: Union, University, Tavern, Country, Roadside (Cleveland), Mayfield Country, University, and Lawyers’ (New...

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Biography of B. S. Smith

B. S. Smith is one of the oldest business men of Humboldt. He had been a merchant there thirty years. In that time he had built up the largest and most complete dry goods establishment not only in the city but in that part of the state: It is a splendid store, stocked with a varied assortment of all the goods required by a discriminating trade, and had been built up on the foundation of square and honest dealing and a careful and painstaking service. Mr. Smith is also well known in other lines of business and as a public spirited citizen. He is an example of success attained in spite of early disadvantages and handicaps. Bergen Stelle Smith was born at Quakertown in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, July 27, 1857. His father, Zachariah Smith, was born in the same part of New Jersey in 1832, was a merchant tailor, and died at Quakertown, New Jersey, in 1862 when only thirty years of age. He was a member of the Baptist Church. He married Lydia Ann Johnston, who was born in 1835 and is now living at Paterson, New Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. Zachariah Smith had three children: William Judson, a resident of Humboldt, Kansas; Emma L., at home with her mother at Paterson, New Jersey; and Bergen S. Mrs. Zachariah Smith married for her second husband Nicol Graham....

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Biography of Lewis Hanback

Lewis Hanback. In the summer of 1865, soon after the close of the Civil war, in which he had played a gallant part as a Union officer, Lewis Hanback came to Topeka to practice law. For many years he was one of the eminent members of the Kansas bar, and he was not less well known and esteemed in public affairs. He was one of the makers of Kansas history during the last half century. He was born at Winchester, Scott County, Illinois, March 27, 1839. He was the oldest of the six children of William and Ann Hanback. His father was a portrait painter by occupation and he frequently changed his place of residence. From Winchester the family went to Quincy, Illinois, where they remained until 1844. Subsequently they lived at Madison, Indiana, in Switzerland County, Indiana, and then returned to Adams County, Illinois, near Quincy, where William Hanback died May 1, 1855, and his wife in March, 1856. The death of the parents broke up the family and the children became separated. Lewis Hanback was seventeen years old when his mother died. He went to work as a farm hand and continued to be so occupied until 1860. He had had but meager advantages as a scholar but by persistent effort he mustered the common branches and for a time attended Cherry Grove Seminary, then a well...

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Biography of George W. Lee, M. D.

George W. Lee, M. D. For fully twenty years Doctor Lee had practiced his profession as a physician and surgeon in Woodson County. The greater part of this time he spent at Toronto, but is now looking after his widely extended patronage from home at Yates Center. He is a highly qualified professional man and of equally high standing in social and civic affairs in Yates Center. Dr. Lee was born at Markham in Morgan County, Illinois, December 4, 1867. His paternal grandfather, George Lee, was born in 1814 in Yorkshire, England, and on coming to America settled near Jacksonville, Illinois, and took up farming. He died at Garrinville, Illinois, in 1879. The maiden name of his wife was Miss Audis. Doctor Lee’s parents were born and reared and spent all their lives on a farm at Markham, Illinois. His father, Thomas Lee, was born in 1838 and died in 1908, and his mother, Martha Hall, was born in 1837 and died in 1904. Thomas Lee was a farmer, a republican in politics, and very active in the Methodist Protestant Church of his community, serving as trustee for a number of years. He and his wife had the following children: Mary, wife of Thomas Eades, a hay dealer at Toronto, Kansas; Sarah and Ida, both of whom died in infancy; Minnie, who died at Markham, Illinois, and married Samuel...

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Biography of William N. Smelser

William N. Smelser has been a member of the Emporia bar for twenty-five years. His had been an enviable record both as a lawyer and as a citizen, and his ability, industry and his conscientious care have brought him a high position among Kansas lawyers. His family have resided in Emporia more than thirty years, and William N. Smelser was about fourteen years old when brought to that city. He was born in Sturgis, in Southern Michigan, February 2, 1870. The Smelsers came originally from Germany, but have been Americans since about the time of the Revolutionary war. The first to come over located in North Carolina. Solomon Smelser, grandfather of the Emporia lawyer, was a farmer and died at Liberty, Indiana, about twenty or twenty-five years ago. W. R. Smelser, father of William N., was born in Richmond, Indiana, in 1842, and as a young man went to Sturgis, Michigan, where he married Amanda M. Roberts, who was born in Sturgis in 1837. She is still living and makes her home with her son William. W. R. Smelser was a farmer before his marriage, afterwards conducted a store at Sturgis until 1876 and then joined the New York Life Insurance Company and was one of the representatives of that company for nearly forty years until his death on May 1, 1914. In 1870 he removed to Kankakee, Illinois,...

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Biographical Sketch of J. L. Aubert

J. L. Aubert, County Surveyor, Mattoon; was born in Licking Co., Ohio, Nov. 3, 1830; his father was a tiller of the soil, and his early life was that of a farmer’s son; at the age of 18, he began work at the carpenter’s trade, and worked under instruction three years. In 1854, he came West and settled in Moultrie Co., Ill., where he purchased land, farmed some, but for the most part followed his trade. In July, 1865, he located in Lebanon, St. Clair Co.; here he remained three years, during which time he contracted and built the public school buildings and the M. E. Church. In 1868, he lived a short time in Shelbyville, and removed from there to Jacksonville, Ill., where he was engaged on the Court House, the East Centenary Church, and on improvements to the Christian Church; he began the study of surveying many years ago, under the direction of J. R. Anderson, his brother-in-law, formerly County Surveyor in Ohio, and later of Moultrie Co., Ill. Mr. Aubert was elected Surveyor of Coles Co. in November, 1875. He was married in 1858 to Minerva R. Morgan, a native of Licking Co.,...

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Biographical Sketch of John White Rodgers

John White Rodgers, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Campbell; owns seventy acres; was born in Morgan Co., Ill., Feb. 10, 1831, and lived with his parents on the farm until 23 years of age. He was married to Margaret Elizabeth Gillinnater April 5, 1854; she was born in Effingham Co., Ill., Jan. 18, 1836; they have bad six children, five of whom are living, viz., James F., Mary L., William B., Hiram M. and Henry G.; deceased-Isaac E. Mr. Rodgers was Overseer of the Road one term and was elected Justice of the Peace, which office he now holds. His parents were natives of Kentucky; hers, of Tennessee; Mrs. Rodgers’ father was in the Mexican war thirteen...

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Biographical Sketch of John W. Baker

John W. Baker, farmer; P. O. Campbell; owns 135 acres in Sec. 19; was born in Morgan Co., Ill., Feb. 17, 1840; lived with his parents until the age of 6, when they died, leaving him to shift for himself; he emigrated to this State in 1861, settling in Coles Co. Was married to Susan D. Rodgers April 5, 1866; she was born in Coles Co., Ill., Feb. 9, 1851; the fruit of this marriage is three children – Effie M., Mary A. and Isaac W. Mr. B. has held the office of School Director six years, and Commissioner of Highways three years. Was in the late rebellion; enlisted in 1861, Co. B, 7th I. V. I.; served three months; re-enlisted Sept. 25, 1861, in Co. E, 5th I. V. C., and served four months in that regiment; was in the battle of Vicksburg, and several other battles and skirmishes. Mrs. Baker’s grandfather on her mother’s side was in the Black Hawk...

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Dehlin, Nola Brummett Mrs.

Richland, Oregon Nola Dehlin, 75, of Richland, died Oct. 25, 2004, at St. Elizabeth Health Services. Her funeral will be Tuesday at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at Jacksonville, Ill. Nola Aileen Dehlin was born on Dec. 5, 1928, at Morgan County, Ill., to Milford Collier and Bertha Lee Leeper Brummett. Nola was raised and educated in Morgan County. She married her loving husband, Richard, at Anchorage, Alaska, in 1958. They were sealed for time and eternity in the Oakland Temple of the LDS Church. After living in Alaska, California, Utah, North Carolina, and Illinois, they settled in Richland, in 2001. Nola was an active member of the LDS Church, serving as a teacher and compassionate service leader in the women’s Relief Society program. She loved teaching in Sunday school, which she did for many years. She loved music, reading, and all animals — especially horses, dogs, and birds. Survivors include her devoted husband, Preston Richard Dehlin; children, Sheri and Christopher Cannon of Reynoldsburg, Ohio, Gary and Jenipher Dehlin, of Halfway, David and Ann Evans of St. George, Utah, and Gregory Gray, of Pennsylvania; five grandchildren, Shawn, Josephine, and Emily Dehlin and Cara and Samantha Cannon; brothers, John Brummett of Mesquite, Nev., and Ed Brummett of Jacksonville, Ill.; and sister Francis Loomis of Camano Island, Wash. She was preceded in death by her parents. Memorial contributions...

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Biography of Hon. William A. Conn

Hon. William A. Conn, of San Bernardino, is one of those strong individualities in the pioneer history of California, who by his force of character and intellect stamped his impress upon the early civilization of the Golden State. Though a number of the first years of his residence on the Pacific coast were passed in the northern part of the State, at San Francisco, yet for a third of a century Southern California has had the benefits of his public-spirited patriotism, his business attainments and his generous philanthropy. Mr. Conn was born in 1814, on the West India Islands, where his father had settled some years previously to engage in shipping and mercantile business, and was a large property owner there. Four years after the birth of the subject of this memoir, he came with his family to the United States and resided several years in the city of Baltimore. Deciding to seek a home in the then new West, he started with his family for Pittsburgh, he and his wife traveling on horseback and the children in a Pennsylvania “schooner” wagon. On reaching the ” Smoke City” the family and their belongings shipped on board a keelboat down the Ohio River for Cincinnati, their final destination being St. Louis. They stopped about a year in the Ohio metropolis, then started for St. Louis, but Mr. Coon was diverted...

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Biography of John D. M. Conrad

John D. M. Conrad. Among the most interesting men of Salina are those who can justly be named pioneers of this fair city. They have a wealth of experience that no later comers can claim, and it is because of their courage and enterprise that such rich and rapid development had taken place. In John D. M. Conrad, who is the only survivor of a once very important body, the first city council of Salina, is found not only a pioneer of this section but also a veteran of honorable record of the great Civil war. John D. M. Conrad was born in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, April 16, 1838. His parents were George J. and Rosanna (Miller) Conrad, the former of whom was born in Maryland and the latter in Bedford County. Until he was about twelve years of age the boy attended the district schools. Then he started to learn the shoemaker’s trade in Pittsburgh and continued working at the same until 1855, when he came west and located at Shelbyville, Illinois. There, on May 25, 1861, he enlisted for service in the Civil war, entering Company B, Fourteenth Volunteer Infantry, the regiment being commanded by Col. John M. Palmer. During his service of three years he took part in many important battles, including Shiloh, Corinth, Hatchie River, Vicksburg, Jackson and others. He was honorably discharged May 25,...

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Biography of Hon. A. R. Burbank

HON. A.R. BURBANK. – Mr. Burbank, a founder of society and business upon the Pacific coast, was born April 15, 1817, near Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the son of Major Daniel Burbank, an American officer in the war of 1812, who came with his family in an open boat down the Alleghany and Ohio rivers as early as 1814, and made a home on its northern shore near the present metropolis. The Major was from Williamstown, Massachusetts. His wife, Margeret Pinchen, was from Atica, New York. In 1818 a further move was made in the family boat down the Ohio to Shanetown, Illinois, thence to McLanesburgh, and in 1825 to Exeter, Morgan county, in the same state. Here, at the age of nine, A.R. Burbank, the subject of this sketch, who was the youngest of a family of six sons and five daughters, met with the loss of his mother by death, and six years later was called upon to bid his father the last farewell, and follow his body to its resting place in the grave. Having received very careful religions and moral training from his parents, and having acquired habits of thrift and industry, he began while still a boy to make a career and carve out for himself a fortune. As a clerk in a store he acquired an insight into and a grasp upon business...

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Biography of William Miller Kenton

William Miller Kenton first came to Kansas nearly forty years ago, acquired an interest in a homestead in Rice County, and by his subsequent exertions had developed a large amount of fine farming land and is one of the leading men of affairs and citizens at Chase. Mr. Kenton was born in Bracken County, Kentucky, October 4, 1850. His Kenton ancestry goes back to the earliest period of colonization of the Kentucky country and the name of Kenton is a famous one in old Kentucky, and doubtless there is some relationship between this branch and the noted Simon Kenton, one of the greatest scouts, frontiersmen and Indian fighters in American annals. The first American ancestor was Marcus Kenton, who came out of Oxford, England, and settled in old Virginia. This Marcus Kenton was early attracted to the Virginia possessions west of the Allegheny Mountains in what is now Kentucky, and his death occurred in Pennsylvania while he was en route from his Virginia home to the place known as Limestone, now Maysville, Kentucky. This Marcus Kenton married a member of the Cleveland family, and some of the later generations more or less jokingly referred to her as a connection of the President of the United States. Marcus Kenton, the immigrant, had a son who bore his name and who came into possession of 18,000 acres of land in Kentucky,...

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Biography of Allen C. Mason

ALLEN C. MASON. – The well-known fact that a city presents, as a whole, the characteristics of the individuals who compose it, finds no better illustration than in the city of Tacoma, Washington. It is wide-awake, enterprising and progressive, and is such not only because of its unrivaled location and its commanding position as the terminus of the great Northern Pacific Railroad, but because its business men are themselves possessed of a spirit of progressive enterprise, are thoroughly imbued with confidence in the great destiny of their city, and are united in their efforts to promote its welfare. Prominent among these public-spirited men, standing at the very front of progress, is Allen C. Mason, to whom Tacoma is largely indebted for its widespread reputation, and for the moneyed interest so many people have taken in it. Since he settled in Tacoma, Mr. Mason has done more to advance its interests than any citizen within its limits. He has had the handling of more real estate, has caused the investment of more money, has more extensively advertised its advantages, and has induced more people to cast their lot in the Terminal city, than any other of its enterprising citizens, of whom there are many. He has seen the city grow, from a few board shanties scattered among the trees and stumps, to its present grand array of brick and stone...

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Biography of F. E. Kellogg

F. E. Kellogg farmer and stock-raiser near Anaheim, was born in Morgan County, Illinois, April 31, 1822. His parents, Elisha and Elizabeth (Derrick) Kellogg, were natives respectively of Massachusetts and Connecticut, and of Scotch descent. They settled first in western New York, where most of the children were born. They emigrated to Morgan County, Illinois, in pioneer times, where Mr. Kellogg built the first house in the county. Elisha Kellogg was a prominent politician in his day, serving as county judge and sheriff of Genesee County, New York. He died in Jo Daviess County, Illinois, in 1844. The subject of this sketch left Independence, Missouri, in May, 1846, and came overland with teams to California, arriving in Napa County in November, before gold was discovered. His journey was a very tedious and troublesome one. He enlisted in Fremont’s army and served six months, being discharged at Mission San Gabriel, in April, 1848. He still receives a pension of $8 per month as a veteran of the Mexican war. He is able to relate many thrilling anecdotes of hardship and adventure. He and three brothers came in ’44 to the Rocky mountains in search of a silver mine, and not finding it they built Fort Laramie by contract. Once he and a brother were attacked by Pawnee Indians, stripped of then clothes and robbed. They had to eat walnuts and...

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