Location: Montgomery County MO

Biographical Sketch of Emanuel Saylor

Emanuel Saylor and his wife, Ann Hulett, were early settlers of Montgomery County. They had James, John H., and Thomas. James married Libbey Cobb, and they had eleven children. John H. married Virginia M. Perkins, of Kentucky. Thomas married Maria Rice, and after his death his widow married John...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles B. Worland

Charles B. Worland, of Maryland, married Martha A. White, and settled in Washington Co., Ky. Their children were Benedict. Charles B., Thomas N., Maria, William T., John H., Stephen W., Edward H., James P., and Martha A. Mr. Worland, his wife, and a portion of their family settled in Montgomery County in 1839. They are excellent people; honest, industrious, intelligent, kind-hearted and...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard Stevens

Richard Stevens was a noted hunter and trapper. He married Sally Ambrose, and settled in Montgomery County in 1831. The first day after his arrival in Montgomery he killed six deer, and during his residence in the County he killed 400 deer, 40 bears, and so many wild cats, raccoons, etc., that he could not keep an account of them. He had six children Hiram A., Emily, Willis, Lucretia, Virginia, and Joseph. Hiram A. married Sarah A. Garrett, and lives in Montgomery County. Emily married Evans B. Scale, and also lives in Montgomery County. The rest of the children settled in other...

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Biographical Sketch of James Rodgers

James Rodgers of Pennsylvania, settled in Nelson Co. Ky., where he raised a large family of children, and gave each of them a Bible. Presley Rodgers, his son, married Elizabeth Folay, of Kentucky, by whom he had Matha A., Mary E., James. John. Plicehe, Felix G , Elizabeth E., Nancy, Jitlia A.. Fernesia, and America. Mr. Rodgers came to Missouri in 1831, and settled in Howard County, afterward in Boone, then in Saline and finally in Montgomery. He was a blacksmith, and worked at his trade until his death, which occurred in December, 1863. He built the first blacksmith shop in Montgomery City. Eight of his eleven children are still living, and seven of them reside in Montgomery...

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Biographical Sketch of William S. Slavens

William S. Slavens was born in Greenbriar Co., Va., September 15, 1887. He was married five times; first to Anna Hawkins, by whom he had three children, second to Mary Riggs, third to Elizabeth Elsbury, by whom he had seven children, fourth to the widow Thomas, whose maiden name was Rebecca Stanley, by whom he had two children; and fifth to the widow Meyers, whose maiden name was Paulina Hunt. Mr. Slavens settled in Montgomery, on Brush Creek, in 1820, and removed to near Middletown in 1829. He owned part of the land that Middletown was built upon. Mr. Slavens came to Missouri in company with his brother Thomas and a Mr. McCarta, in a little horse cart. Their stock consisted of one cow, the property of William Slavens, which they drove before them and for which he was offered forty acres of land within the present limits of St. Louis; but thought his cow was worth more than the land, and kept her. Mr. Slavens had $640 in money, which he loaned to Mr. McCarter, who invested it in Irish potatoes, and planted them on ten acres of land in Illinois. The potato crop was a failure, and the money was never repaid. The names of Mr. Slavens’ children were James H., Sarah, Isabella, Lydia A., Martha A., Aaron, William N., Henry B., Euphemia, Louisa, Elizabeth, and Mary...

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Biographical Sketch of Matthew L. White

Matthew L. White was born and raised in Virginia, but removed to East Tennessee, from there to Alabama, and in 1829 he settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., and entered the land upon which the celebrated Pinnacle Rock stands. He married Rhoda Stagdon, and they had Nancy, William, Thomas S., James H., Isaac M., John R., Mary J., Rebecca, Samuel M., Margaret A., and Martha...

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Biographical Sketch of Enoch Spry

Enoch Spry came to Missouri from Clark County, Kentucky, with Simon Griggs and Cornelius Howard, when he was fifteen years of age. He married Mary A Logan, the only sister of William, Alexander, Hugh and Henry Logan, and settled in Montgomery County in 1817. They had eight children. Soon after steamboats began to navigate the Missouri river, Mr. Spry, happening to be in the vicinity of the river one day, heard a boat blow its whistle, at which lie became very much frightened, and ran home. He told his neighbors that a panther had caught a man down on the river, and he never heard any one halloo like he did. His story created so much excitement that a company was organized and went in pursuit of the ‚Äúpanther,” which, of course, they did not...

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Biographical Sketch of Caleb Summers

Caleb Summers was raised in Montgomery County, Maryland, where he married Rachel Crawford. In 1796 he settled in Jefferson County, Kentucky. His children were Polly, Benjamin, Robert, Thomas, and. Malinda. Robert married his cousin, Grace Summers, and settled in Pike County, Missouri, in 1834. His children were William B., Elizabeth, Caleb L., Noah, Benjamin F., George, Robert A., and Thomas. William B. married the widow Tucker, whose maiden name was Margaret J. Bryan, and settled in Montgomery County in 1840. Caleb L. married Sallie A. Bryan, and settled in Montgomery County in 1840. Benjamin F. married Antoinette Sharp, and settled in Montgomery County in 1842. Noah married and settled in Montgomery the same year. Benjamin, son of Caleb Summers, Sr., married: Polly Raferty, and settled in Montgomery County in 1839. The father of Caleb Summers. Sr. came to America in 1750, and the boots he wore then are in the museum at...

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Biographical Sketch of Christopher Sanders

Christopher Sanders settled near Loutre Lick, in Montgomery County, at an early date. He was a great hunter, but somewhat indolent, and generally depended upon borrowing a gun to shoot his game with rather than perform the labor of carrying one. He raised four sons and two daughters Jack, James, Joseph, William, Nancy, and Rachel. William married Ivy Slavens, a daughter of Stewart Slavens, of...

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Biography of Natley Dutton

Natley Dutton and wife, of England, settled in Maryland some time after Lord Baltimore began to colonize that State. Their son, Natley, Jr., was born and raised in Maryland. He had a son, named John H., who was born in 1790. Mr. Dutton died when his son was eleven years of age, and two years afterward his mother had him bound out to learn the ship carpenter’s trade. He worked at that business fourteen years. In the meantime his mother had married a Mr. Elton, whose father was a Quaker and came to America with William Penn. They had a son named Thomas T. Elton, and in 1818, he and his half-brother, John H. Dutton, in company with Philip Glover, started to Missouri. They traveled in a wagon to Wheeling, Virginia, where they bought a flat-boat, and loading their wagon and team into it, they floated clown to Maysville, Kentucky, where they traded their flat-boat for a keel-boat, transferred their property to it, and proceeded to Louisville. There they sold their boat and came by land to Missouri. They located first in St. Charles County, where they rented land and lived two years. They then entered land on North Bear creek, in Montgomery County, and settled there. Mr. Elton married Eleanor Glover, and raised a large family of children. He subsequently removed to Grant County, Wisconsin, where he now...

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Biography of Henry Davault

Henry Davault was born in France, but married Catharine Maria Grover, of Germany. They emigrated to America about the year 1764, landed near Philadelphia, and settled near Hanover, York Co., Pa., where they lived and died. Mr. Davault served in the revolutionary war, under General Washington. He died at the age of 85, but his wife lived to the remarkably old age of 97 years, 4 months and ten days. They had the following children Philip, Margaret, Elizabeth and Gabriel (twins), Catharine, Mary, Henry, Valentine, Frederick, Julia, and Jacob. Philip was one year old when his parents arrived in America. He married Catharine Long. Margaret married Samuel Long. Elizabeth married John Kitzmiller. Gabriel married Mary Kitzmiller. Catharine married Nicholas Keefauver. Mary married Martin Kitzmiller. Henry married Kitty Gross. Valentine married Louisa Range. Julia married Jacob Warts. Jacob married Rachel Kitzmiller. Philip Davault had the following children Mary, Kate, Margaret, Lydia, Louisa, Daniel, and Eliza. One of these children married John Harshey, and died in Maryland. Another married William Roberts, and lived in Baltimore. Another married William Landers and lived in Illinois. Another married John Kitzmiller, and lived in Tennessee. Another married Mary Kitzmiller, and lived in Tennessee. Another married James Larrimore, and lived in Ohio. The children of Frederick Davault were Henry, Peter, David, Mary, Elizabeth, John, Louisa, Kitty, and Samuel. Most of these children settled and lived in...

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Biographical Sketch of David Dryden

David Dryden, of Pennsylvania, married Barbara Berry, and settled in Washington County, Va., where he and his wife both died. Their children were Jonathan, David, Nathaniel, William, Thomas, Rebecca, Elizabeth, and Mary. Jonathan married Fanny Duff, and lived and died in Kentucky. David was married twice, the name of his second wife being Jane Laughlan. He settled in Blunt County, Tenn. Nathaniel was also married twice; first to Ellen Laughlan, a daughter of Alexander and Ann Laughlan, but she died without children. Mr. Dryden was married the second time to Margaret Craig, a daughter of Robert Craig, who was a son of a revolutionary soldier, and they had Frederick H., John D. S., Ellen E., Mary R, Jane R., Louisa W., Thomas A., Margaret, David C., Caroline, and William P. Mr. Dryden represented Washington County, Va., in the Legislature of that State before he came to. Missouri, and after he settled in Montgomery County in 1829, he represented that County in the Missouri Legislature several terms. He also held other important positions in the County, and was an influential and highly esteemed citizen. He died in 1858, in his. 75th year; his widow still survives, in her 83d...

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Biographical Sketch of Lawson Drury

Lawson Drury was a native of Worcester Co., Mass., but removed to New Hampshire, where he married Elizabeth Johnson. Their children were Lawson, Jr., Charles, and Ruth. His first wife died, and he was married the second time. His children by his second wife were George, John, James, and Sarah. Mr. Drury removed from New Hampshire to Ohio, where he became Judge of the County Court for the County in which he lived. After the death of his second wife he came to Missouri and lived with his son Charles, at Danville, where he died in July, 1835, in his 65th year. Charles Drury came to Missouri at a very early date, and was the second merchant in Montgomery County, Daniel Robinson being the first. Drury’s first store was at Loutre Lick, but in 1834 he removed to Danville. He was an honest, enterprising man, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He married Sally A. Wiseman, of Boone County, who was a daughter of James Wiseman and Mary Tuttle. Their children were-Lawson, James H., Susan B., Charles J., Jarrett, Joseph, Andrew M., Richard B., Nary E., and Elizabeth. Mr. Drury died in Danville in 1848, in his 47th year. Five of his children, James H., Jarrett, Joseph, Andrew H., and Elizabeth, died unmarried. Lawson was married twice; first to Margaret Frazier, and second to Catharine Nilson....

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