Location: Montgomery County MD

Biography of Hon. Ninian Edwards

The eminent character of this gentleman requires more than a passing mention, in fact, a sketch of the early courts and bar of Christian County would be imperfect without an extended notice of him and his many public services. He has left a record in two States that time cannot efface. As a lawyer, jurist and statesman he was pre-eminently great. For nearly forty years he devoted his best energies to the service of his country, wielding an influence exceeded by few of his day and time. At the period when Judge Ninian Edwards lived his most active life, the surroundings were such as we know little or nothing of now except by tradition. The pioneer people were rough, rude, simple, sincere, honest, warm-hearted and hospitable. In the young State were the two extremes, the rude simplicity, and the gifted, brilliant children of genius, and amid these surroundings Judge Edwards trod his pathway of life, the pure politician, lawyer and statesman. He was born in 1775, in Montgomery County, Md. His father, Benjamin Edwards, was a native of Virginia, and a man of considerable prominence, having served in the Maryland Legislature, in the State Convention which ratified the Federal Constitution, and also represented his State in Congress from 1793 to 1795. Ninian Edwards graduated in Dickinson College, Pennsylvania. He studied law and medicine, and practiced the former with great success....

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Biographical Sketch of Caleb Summers

Caleb Summers was raised in Montgomery County, Maryland, where he married Rachel Crawford. In 1796 he settled in Jefferson County, Kentucky. His children were Polly, Benjamin, Robert, Thomas, and. Malinda. Robert married his cousin, Grace Summers, and settled in Pike County, Missouri, in 1834. His children were William B., Elizabeth, Caleb L., Noah, Benjamin F., George, Robert A., and Thomas. William B. married the widow Tucker, whose maiden name was Margaret J. Bryan, and settled in Montgomery County in 1840. Caleb L. married Sallie A. Bryan, and settled in Montgomery County in 1840. Benjamin F. married Antoinette Sharp, and settled in Montgomery County in 1842. Noah married and settled in Montgomery the same year. Benjamin, son of Caleb Summers, Sr., married: Polly Raferty, and settled in Montgomery County in 1839. The father of Caleb Summers. Sr. came to America in 1750, and the boots he wore then are in the museum at...

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Slave Narrative of Phillip Johnson

Interviewer: Guthrie Person Interviewed: Phillip Johnson Location: Poolesville, Maryland Ref: Phillip Johnson, R.F.D. Poolesville, Md. The subject of this sketch is a pure blooded Negro, whose kinky hair is now white, likewise his scraggy beard. He is of medium size and somewhat stooped with age, but still active enough to plant and tend a patch of corn and the chores about his little place at Sugarlands. His home is a small cabin with one or two rooms upstairs and three down, including the kitchen which is a leanto. The cabin is in great disrepair. Phillip John is above the average in intelligence, has some education and is quite well versed in the Holy Scriptures, having been for many years a Methodist preacher among his people. He uses fairly good English and freely talks in answer to questions. Without giving the questions put to him by this writer, his remarks given in the first person and as near his own idiom are as follows: “I’ll be ninety years old next December. I dunno the day. My Missis had the colored folks ages written in a book but it was destroyed when the Confederate soldiers came through. But she had a son born two or three months younger than me and she remember that I was born in December, 1847, but she had forgot the day of the month. “I was...

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Slave Narrative of Lucy Brooks

Interviewer: Guthrie Person Interviewed: Lucy Brooks Location: Forest Glen, Maryland Place of Residence: Forest Glen, Montgomery County, Md. References: Interview with Aunt Lucy and her son, Lafayette Brooks. Aunt Lucy, an ex-slave, lives with her son, Lafayette Brooks, in a shack on the Carroll Inn Springs property at Forest Glen, Montgomery County, Md. To go to her home from Rockville, leave the Court House going east on Montgomery Ave. and follow US Highway No. 240, otherwise known as the Rockville Pike, in its southeasterly direction, four and one half miles to the junction with it on the left (east) of the Garrett Park Road. This junction is directly opposite the entrance to the Georgetown Preparatory School, which is on the west of this road. Turn left on the Garrett Park Road and follow it through that place and crossing Rock Creek go to Kensington. Here cross the tracks of the B.&O. R.R. and parallel them onward to Forest Glen. From the railroad station in this place go onward to Forest Glen. From the railroad station in this place go onward on the same road to the third lane branching off to the left. This lane will be identified by the sign “Carroll Springs Inn”. Turn left here and enter the grounds of the inn. But do not go up in front of the inn itself which is one quarter...

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Biographical Sketch of Armon Cravens

Armon Cravens, was born in Montgomery County, Maryland, but removed to Kentucky in 1776. He married Abigail Hathaway, of Maryland, and they had eighteen children, only nine of whom lived to be grown. Their son John was a soldier in the war of 1812, and married Elizabeth Burton, of Kentucky, by whom he had James S., Paulina, Pernielia, Hudson, William, Louisa, John, and Louisiana. Hudson married Virginia Walden, of Virginia, and settled in Missouri in 1836. In 1852 he left Missouri and went to Texas, but was so dissatisfied with the country that he did not unload his wagon. He came back to Missouri and was satisfied. While in Texas he experienced several “northers,” and came near freezing to death. He asserted that his dog was frozen fast in the mud, and that he had to pile all his bed clothes on his horses to keep them from freezing. William Cravens settled in Montgomery County in 1843, and married Louisa...

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Biography of James A. McGonigle

James A. McGonigle. For many reasons may James A. McGonigle, contractor and builder and one of Leavenworth’s most respected citizens, be regarded as deserving of extended mention in a history of Kansas. He came to Leavenworth as a pioneer in 1857; he was an early, brave and loyal soldier in the Union army until incapacitated by wounds in the Civil war; since then had been more prominent in the upbuilding of the city than any other man; and still at the age of eighty-three carries on large business operations and with the same facility and exactness that won him the reputation of being the foremost contractor in Kansas and other states. James A. McGonigle was born at Hagerstown, Maryland, February 8, 1834. His father, James McGonigle, was born in County Derry, near the Giant’s Causeway, Ireland. When a young man he started out for himself, going to Londonderry and there learning the weaver’s trade, and when about twenty-five years old, in 1813, crossed the Atlantic ocean in one of the old sailing vessels of the time, which, after months on the water, safely landed him at Hagerstown, Maryland. He found work at his trade, hand looms being used exclusively at that time, and continued until the invention and introduction of weaving machinery made hand work unprofitable. He was an industrious man and then turned his attention to farming, in...

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Maryland Cemetery Records, Frederick to Montgomery Counties

Maryland Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Maryland county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MarylandMaryland Cemetery Records, Alleghany to BaltimoreMaryland Cemetery Records, Calvert to Dorchester CountiesMaryland Cemetery Records, Frederick to Montgomery CountiesMaryland Cemetery Records, Prince George to Worcester CountiesRocky Gap Veterans Cemetery Frederick County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Frederick County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Beaver Dam German Baptist Cemetery Benton Family Cemetery Bush Creek German Brethren Church Cemetery Catholic Church Cemetery Central Chapel United Methodist Church Cronise-Fundenburg Family Cemetery Elias Evangelical Lutheran Cemetery German Reformed Church Cemetery , aka St James Reformed Church Glade Reformed Cemetery Graceham Moravian Cemetery Grossnickle Church of the Brethren Cemetery House-Phillips Cemetery Ira Sears Cemetery Israel’s Creek Keedysville Cemetery Koontz Chapel Kramer-Jacobs Cemetery Linganore Cemetery McLain Family Cemetery McElfresh Burying Ground Mt. Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery Prospect United Methodist Church Cemetery Providence Methodist Church Cemetery Rocky Springs Cemetery Simmons Family Cemetery St. Ignatius Catholic St. John’s Lutheran Church Cemetery St. John’s Lutheran Church Cemetery St. Mark’s Lutheran Church Cemetery St. Matthews Lutheran Church St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church Summers Family Cemetery Tom’s Creek Cemetery Whitmore Cemetery Zimmerman Family Cemetery Zion Episcopal Cemetery Following Cemeteries (hosted at Interment) Hawbottom Johnson Family Cemetery Wolfesville...

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