Location: Montgomery County KY

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Craddik

Thomas Craddick, a typical Kentuckian and a self-made man, now residing on his farm in Arcola Township, was born in Montgomery County, Kentucky, April 13, 1856, and is a son of Michael Craddick and Catherine (Welch) Craddick, who were natives of Ireland. His father emigrated from Kentucky to Arcola Township 1869 and died in 1890. His mother died in 1896, and they are both buried in the Arcola cemetery. Mr. Craddick’s farm contains one hundred and fourteen acres of land. He has never been married. Socially he is very popular and in business one of the substantial men of the...

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Biography of Robert M. Black

Robert M. Black, the subject of this memoir, came from an ancestry of more than ordinary importance and prominence. His great-grandfather, with his family, removed from Scotland and settled in Virginia some years before the Revolutionary war, caused by the traitor Arnold in portions of Virginia, volunteered, though far past the age of liability, for military service, and was one of the soldiers, who, under Lafayette and Gen. Wayne, turned and drove back Lord Cornwallis. He was intimately acquainted with Lafayette, Gen. Wayne and Gen. Lord Sterling, who were frequent guests at his house. His youngest son, George Black, the grandfather of our subject, was born on the 8th of July, 1767. He was nine years old when the Declaration of Independence was issued. He was a son of the Revolution and saw and caught the spirit of most of the stirring scenes of that eventful period. George Black, with his family, re-moved from Virginia and settled in Kentucky, some time before the war of 1812. He became a soldier of this war in a regiment of mounted rifleman and rendered important service under the command of Gen. Harrison. With such an ancestry, whose character and qualities he reproduced and reflected, together passed through the terrors and excitement with his own individual traits, we may under stand the life of Robert M. Black, who was the ninth in a...

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Biographical Sketch of Presley Anderson

Presley Anderson and his wife, Elizabeth Steele, settled in Montgomery Co., Ky., in 1779. Their children were John A. S., James, William, Presley, Jr., Lucy, and Eliza. John A. S., better known as Captain Jack, was a remarkable man in his day, and is well remembered by the old citizens of Montgomery and Callaway counties. We give his history elsewhere. Presley, Jr., married Euphemia Jones, of Tennessee, and settled first in Warren Co., Mo., in 1814, from whence he removed to Montgomery County in 1817, and settled near Brush creek. He brought his family to Missouri on pack-horses, and they occupied Robert Ramsey’s house, near Marthasville, soon after the murder of the family of the latter. The blood was still upon the-floor when they went into the house, and Mrs. Anderson scoured it up before they put their furniture in. During the Indian war Mr. Anderson served as a ranger in Capt. Hargrove’s company, in Illinois. He was a devout Methodist, and the preachers of that denomination held services in his house for many years. The names of his children were Presley, Jr., Joseph, James, William, John, Margaret, Lucy, Elizabeth, and Eliza. James Anderson married Eliza Journey, of St. Charles County, and settled on Brush creek, in Montgomery County. He afterward removed to St. Louis County, where he died. Eliza Anderson married John Dabney, who settled near Middletown in...

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Montgomery Co., Ky

MONTGOMERY CO. (Gladys Robertson) In this community most of the slaves were kept on farms and each family was given a well constructed log house. They were fed by provisions given them by their white masters and they were plentiful. They were clothed by their masters. These clothes were made by the colored women under the direction and supervision of their mistress, the white woman cut the clothes for both men and women, and the colored women did the sewing of the garments. The men did the manual labor on the farm and the women the domestic. Each white woman and girl had a special servant for her own use and care and each white man had his colored man or valet. There are no records of a big slave trade in this county. When a slave was sold it was usually to a friend or neighbor and most masters were very considerate and would not sell unless a family could go together. For instance from the diary of Mrs. Wliza[TR: Eliza?] Magowan 1853-1871, we read this: “Lina and two children Scott and Dulcina sold to J. Wilkerson.” Also another item: “Violet married to Dennie” showing that care was taken that marriages were made among the negroes. The darkies had suppers in their own quarters and had much merrymaking and laughter. Illness among the darkies were cared from among...

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Clark Co., Ky

CLARK CO. (Mayme Nunnelley) The first records of Slaves in Clark County was given by a descendant of one of the members of the little band of resolute Revolutionary soldiers who had been comrades and mess mates throughout the long bloody war. These fifteen families, some from Virginia and others from Maryland, started westward in the early spring of 1783 for Kentucky. They bought with them some horses, a few cattle, thirty or forty slaves and a few necessary household articles. After many hardships and trials, borne heroically by both men and women, they halted on the banks of the Big Stoner, in what is now the eastern part of Clark County. Two years later another group of families with their slaves came to join this little settlement. In some cases the owners were good to their slaves had comfortable quarters for them at a reasonable distance from the main house. Their clothing was given them as they needed it. In most instances the clothing was made on the plantation Material woven, and shoes made. The cabins were one and two rooms, maybe more if the families were large. The slaves ate their meals in the kitchen of the main house. A cruel and inhuman master was ostrazied and taught by the silent contempt of his neighbors a lesson which he seldom failed to learn. In 1789 the general...

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Biography of David M. James

DAVID M. JAMES. There are few features of business enterprise which contribute a larger quota to the convenience of the residential and transient public than the well-appointed livery stable, and a valuable acquisition to the town of West Plains, Missouri, is the establishment of this kind owned and conducted by David M. James. This gentleman owes his nativity to Henry County, Kentucky, where he was born in 1833, a son of Dr. Beverly W. and Matilda (Day) James, natives of the old State of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. When a young man Dr. James removed to Kentucky and was there married to Mary Eubank, who died soon after, and after this event he moved to Kentucky, where he eventually married Miss Matilda Day. He was a man of more than ordinary intellectual ability and learning, and as a physician was very successful and well liked. Prior to the birth of the subject of this sketch he lived for a time in Bloomington, Indiana, where he taught school, but afterward returned to Kentucky and lived in several different counties. He at one time edited a paper in Newcastle, Kentucky, and then one in Charlestown, Indiana, and was for some years associate judge of the Charlestown, (Indiana) Circuit Court. He was a strong Union man during the war, but took no part in the struggle; was a Democrat in politics and...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank Wyatt

Frank Wyatt was a native of North Carolina, but settled and lived in Montgomery Co., Ky. He came to Missouri five times to look at the country, but could never make up his mind to move here. He had four sons John, Anthony, Douglass, and Joseph. John was a Captain in the war of 1812. He settled in Missouri in 1817, and married Attossa Sharp, by whom he had seven children John, Jr., Sarah, Harriet, Catharine, Margaret, Lucy, and Mary. Anthony came to Missouri in 1816. He married Mary Smith, daughter of Henry Smith and Nancy Davis (who were natives of Wales), and by her he had Henry S., James W., Joseph, Martha A., Nancy J., and Frank. Douglass Wyatt settled in Missouri in 1817. He married Elizabeth See, of Montgomery County, and they had Hayden, Amanda, Emily, Frank, Douglass, Jr., Joseph and Mary. Joseph Wyatt, son of Frank, Sr., died a bachelor, in Franklin Co., Mo. (Children of Anthony Wyatt.) Henry S. married Sarah Hopping. James W. married Martha A. Pearle. Joseph married Susan Griswold. Martha A. married Thomas J. Marshall, of Mexico, Mo., who was County Clerk of Warren County for eighteen years. Nancy J. married John Jones, of Mexico, Mo. Frank was married twice; first to Eliza A. Jones, and after her death, to Maria Farsdale. Mr. Wyatt built a ferry boat for Thomas Howell, who...

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Biographical Sketch of David Howard

David Howard, of Mount Sterling, Ky., married first to Margaret Fourt, and settled on Charrette creek, in Warren County, 1819. His children were James, Peter, Thomas, Polly, John, and Jackson. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Howard married the widow McCutchen, whose maiden name was Rebecca Caton. By her he had Elizabeth, George, and Naoma. Mr. Howard was a great hunter and sugar maker, and made the best maple sugar in the country. He was also a zealous Methodist, and his name is prominently identified with the early history of that church in his county. His son, John Howard, is at present Sheriff and Collector of Warren...

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Biographical Sketch of John Hutton

John Hutton, farmer; P.O. Diona; is one of the pioneers of this county, and after whom this township was named; he was born in Montgomery Co., Ky., Jan. 20, 1801; in the year 1816, his parents moved to Crawford Co:, Ill., where his father died January, 1819; his mother and family remained there until the year 1834, when they came to Coles Co., and settled on Sec. 20, where his mother died Nov., 1853, at the age of 77; Mr. Hutton still resides upon the homestead; he held the office of Supervisor the three first terms after the organization of the township; in the year 1824, Mr. Hutton was upon the spot upon which the city of Charleston, in this county, now stands; at that time not another white man was to be found in the neighborhood, inhabited only by the Kickapoo Indians, who were owners of the soil. He married the widow of Isaac Baker April 18, 1843; she was a daughter of George Cottingham, a native of Kentucky, who came to Coles Co. in the year 1837; she was born Oct. 27, 1813; she had one child by Mr. Baker-Levi H., now living in California, and nine children by Mr. Hutton-six boys, all living – George W., born April 18, 1844; James Alexander, Nov. 19, 1847; Isaac Y., Jan. 6, 1850; John A., March 13,1852; and Alfred...

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Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at SK Publications Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at SK Publications Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at SK Publications Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at SK Publications Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted...

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Montgomery County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Montgomery County Montgomery County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Montgomery County USGenWeb Archives Project Branham Cemetery Civil War Cemetery Chase Cemetery Enoch Smith Cemetery French Cemetery Grassy Lick Cemetery Greene Cemetery 1 Greene Cemetery 2 Hiler Cemetery James Prewitt Cemetery Johnson and Chambers Cemetery Lovely Cemetery , aka Old Salem Matt Willoughby Cemetery Machpelah Cemetery Mann Cemetery Morgan Station Cemetery Nelson Cemetery Oldham Cemetery Oldham Cemetery Old Salem Cemetery Old Salem Cemetery Orear Cemetery Orear Cemetery 2 Parrish Cemetery Peyton’s Lick Cemetery Prewitt Cemetery Prewitt and Combs Cemetery Reason Cemetery Redmon Cemetery Spratt and Cockrell Cemetery St. Thomas Cemetery Stephen’s Cemetery Templin Cemetery Thompson Cemetery Tipton Cemetery Tipton Cemetery Trimble and Cheatam Cemetery Turner Cemetery Wade Cemetery Whatkins Cemetery Webster Cemetery Webster Cemetery Willoughby Cemetery Wilson Cemetery Wilson Cemetery Montgomery County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Beth’s Blog Yeaman Cemetery Willoughby Cemetery Montgomery County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Tombstone Central James Prewitt Cemetery Mann Cemetery...

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Biography of Col. John Colgate Bell

COL. JOHN COLGATE BELL. – Colonel Bell, enjoying a wide reputation from Southern Oregon to Idaho, and back again to the Pacific seashore throughout the state in which he has successively lived and made a multitude of personal acquaintances, merits a special recognition on account of his public services in official relations and in the early Indian wars of Southern Oregon. He was born at Sterling, Kentucky, February 24, 1814. His parents were from Virginia; and among his ancestors were those distinguished in the early history of the nation, his father having served with General Harrison in the war of 1812. The young man received his education at the Mount Sterling Academy, and began business at his native town in the dry-goods store of David Herren. In 1834, he began his western career by removing with his father to Missouri, engaging with him in mercantile business at Clarksville, Pike county. Eight years later he entered into business on his own account at Weston, and in 1845 was married to Miss Sarah E., daughter of General Thompson Ward, of honorable fame in the Mexican war. In 1847 he was engaged with the General in organizing the regiments of Donovan and Price and the battalion of Major Powell sent to new Fort Kearney on the plains for the protection of emigrants. It was in these operations that he received his military...

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Biography of Hon. William R. Downey

HON. WILLIAM R. DOWNEY. – There are few men who are more familiarly and favorably known to the old pioneers of Puget Sound than the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. His father was a Revolutionary hero, having followed General Washington in the battles waged by the colonists for freedom from the oppression of Great Britain. Mr. Downey was born in Mount Sterling, Kentucky, March 6, 1808. At the age of three years he accompanied his parents to Hopkins county, and while living there received his education. On February 12, 1829, he was united in marriage to Miss Emily S. Wetzel. Twelve children were born to them, four of whom now survive. In 1850 he, with his family, removed to Dade county, Missouri. In the spring of 1853 they started to the far-off West, and arrived on Puget Sound October 15th of that year, locating a home on the Nisqually Plains. On the breaking out of the Indian war of 1855-56, he was obliged with other settlers to abandon his home and seek protection for his family in the fort erected at Steilacoom, where they remained until the cessation of hostilities. In common with his neighbors, he shouldered his gun and enlisted for the campaign, serving in all the engagements until 1857, when the Indians were subjugated and peace restored. On the return of the settlers to their homes,...

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Biographical Sketch of Isaac N. Craig

Isaac N. Craig, retired farmer; P. O. Charleston; one of the early settlers of Coles County; was born in Montgomery Co., Ky., Sept. 25, 1810; his father removed with his family to Illinois in 1828, and purchased a farm in Clark Co.; Isaac N. remained at home on the farm until 1831. On the 14th of April, 1831, he was married to Miss Catherine Henson, of Edgar Co., Ill., who died May 1, 1841, leaving five children, three of whom are living – La Fayette, Elizabeth – Mrs. Harmon Gregg – and Harriet, wife of Harvey Fowler; Mr. Craig, after his marriage, settled in Clark Co. On the breaking-out of the Black Hawk war, Mr. Craig enlisted in the 2d Brigade, under Gen. Milton Alexander, and served through the war. In 1835, he removed to Coles Co., where he has been a prominent farmer and stock-raiser ever since; Mr. Craig began life poor, and has met with some reverses of fortune, but has, nevertheless, accumulated a handsome property; he owns some seven hundred acres of land in the county, and a fine residence, with twenty acres of land, in the city of Charleston, where he resides; he is a Director and stockholder in the Second National Bank. He married his present estimable wife July 1, 1841; she was Miss Elizabeth Bloyer, of Coles Co.; they have had eight children,...

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