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Location: Montgomery County AL

Montgomery County Alabama Marriage Records

The following information details the Montgomery County Alabama Marriage Records available online. Hosted at Alabama GenWeb Archives Misc. Marriage Records Marriage Records Connected to the Samuel Pool Bayne Family Bozeman Marriages 1827-1876 Cameron Marriages (Jefferson, Mobile, & Montgomery Counties) Grimes Marriages in Alabama, 1821 – 1934 Vann, Van Marriage Licenses, Vol. A-18, 1817-1919 Various Marriages for Urquharts, Williams, and related families, 1818-1915 Hosted at Ancestry.com $ Alabama Marriages, 1809-1920 $ This database is a collection of marriage records from the state between 1809 and 1920. Researchers will find the names of both bride and groom along with the marriage date. Montgomery, 1818-1860 Alabama Marriages, 1800-1969 $ Alabama marriage information taken from county courthouse records. Many of these records were extracted from copies of the original records in microfilm, microfiche, or book format, located at the Family History Library Montgomery, 1817-1861, 1869, 1925,...

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Montgomery County, Alabama Newspapers

Hosted at Montgomery County, USGenWeb Archives Project Excerpts Of Interest From The Montgomery Daily Advertiser – 1866, Montgomery, Alabama Excerpts Of Interest From The Montgomery Daily Advertiser: 1871 – 1872, Montgomery, Alabama Excerpts Of Interest From “Southern Plantation,” January – March 1875, Montgomery, Alabama Interments Reported January 1, 1881, Montgomery, Alabama Interments Reported January 20, 1881, Montgomery, Alabama Social Calendar, Alabama Journal News, June 8, 1944, Montgomery, Alabama Social Calendar, Alabama Journal News, June 6, 1944, Montgomery, Alabama James C. Keefe Receives His Son’s (Robert J. Keefe) Posthumous Award, June 6, 1944, Montgomery, Alabama St. Mark’s Methodist Church Society Holds Monthly Meeting, 1944, Montgomery, Alabama Alabama Pen Women To Hold State Convention, 1944, Montgomery, Alabama Mobilian To Head Spanish War Vets, 1944, Montgomery, Alabama Marriage Announcement For Fort Hargrove & Jane Argyra Owen, Montgomery, Alabama Allen Rankin File August 16 1940 First Hanging In Montgomery County, Montgomery, Alabama 50th Wedding Anniversary Of Mr. And Mrs. Hyram Barry, 1873, Montgomery, Alabama Miss Calhoun Honored With Prenuptial Parties, Lowndes, Alabama Marriage Announcement For Leola Barnes & E. P. Williamson, Montgomery, Alabama Montgomery, Alabama April 6 1902 Willis Mcdonald, Ex-Slave, 107 1936 A Fatal Difficulty At Fort Deposit, Lowndes, Alabama Death Notices Death Notice For Mrs. Ann Dodd, Montgomery, Alabama Death Notice For Mrs. Alex Finney, Montgomery, Alabama Death Notice For Mrs. Alice Stafford Kerr, Montgomery, Alabama Death Notice For Major Abner...

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Creek Burial Customs

The Creeks had burial customs resembling those of the Chickasaw, and, in some instances, deposited the remains of their dead beneath the floors of their habitations. To quote from Bartram: ” The Muscogulges bury their deceased in the earth. They dig a four-square deep pit under the cabin or couch which the deceased lay on, in his house, lining the grave with Cypress bark, where they place the corpse in a sitting posture, as if it were alive; depositing with him his gun, tomahawk, pipe, and such other matters as he had the greatest value for in his life time.” And when Romans referred to the same people, he said: ” The dead are buried in a sitting posture, and they are furnished with a musket, powder and ball, a hatchet, pipe, some tobacco, a club, a bow and arrows, a looking glass, some vermillion and other trinkets, in order to come well provided in the land of spirits.” Another traveler a few years later, in 1791, left a brief account of the customs of the Creeks, and said in part: “Upon the Decease of an Adult of either Sex, the Friends and Relations of the Decedent religiously collect whatever he or she held most dear in Life, and inter them close by and sometimes in their Owner’s Grave. This pious Tribute to their Dead includes Horses, Cows, Hogs,...

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Muklasa Indians

Muklasa Tribe: Meaning in Alabama and Choctaw, “friends,” or “people of one nation.” Connections. Since the Muklasa did not speak Muskhogean and their name is from the Koasati, Alabama, or Choctaw language, and since they were near neighbors of the two former, it is evident that they were connected with one or the other of them. Location. On the south bank of Tallapoosa River in Montgomery County. (See Florida and Oklahoma) History. When we first hear of the Muklasa in 1675 they were in the position above given and remained there until the end of the Creek-American War, when they are said to have emigrated to Florida in a body. Nothing is heard of them afterward, however, and although Gatschet (1884) states that there was a town of the name in the Creek Nation in the west in his time, I could learn nothing about it when I visited the Creeks in 1911-12. Population.-In 1760 the Muklasa are said to have had 50 men, in 1761, 30, and in 1792, 30. These are the only figured available regarding their...

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Muskogee Indians

Muskogee. Meaning unknown, but perhaps originally from Shawnee and having reference to swampy ground. To this tribe the name Creeks was ordinarily applied. Also called: Ani’-Gu’sa, by the Cherokee, meaning “Coosa people,” after an ancient and famous town on Coosa River. Ku-û’sha, by the Wyandot. Ochesee, by the Hitchiti. Sko’-ki han-ya, by the Biloxi. Muskogee Connections. The Muskogee language constitutes one division of the Muskhogean tongues proper, that which I call Northern. Muskogee Location. From the earliest times of which we have any record these people seem to have had towns all the way from the Atlantic coast of Georgia and the neighborhood of Savannah River to central Alabama. (See also Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.) Muskogee Villages It is difficult to separate major divisions of the Muskogee from towns and towns from villages, but there were certainly several distinct Muskogee tribes at a very early period. The following subdivisional classification is perhaps as good as any: Abihka (in St. Clair, Calhoun, and Talladega Counties): Abihka-in-the-west, a late branch of Abihka in the western part of the Creek Nation, Okla. Abihkutci, on Tallassee Hatchee Creek, Talladega County, on the right bank 5 miles from Coosa River. Kan-tcati, on or near Chocolocko, or Choccolocco, Creek and probably not far from the present “Conchardee.” Kayomalgi, possibly settled by Shawnee or Chickasaw, probably near Sylacauga, Talladega County. Lun-ham-ga, location unknown. Talladega,...

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Montgomery County, Alabama Census Records

  1830 Montgomery County, Alabama Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1830 Montgomery County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Montgomery County, Alabama Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1840 Montgomery County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Montgomery County, Alabama Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1850 Montgomery County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1850 U.S. Census Guide 1855 Montgomery County, Alabama State Census Hosted at Montgomery County, Alabama USGenWeb Archives Project Baynes And Others Related To The Baynes In Montgomery County, 1855 Census, Montgomery, Alabama 1860 Montgomery County, Alabama Census Free 1860 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1860 Montgomery County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Montgomery County, Alabama USGenWeb Archives Project 1860 Federal Census Montgomery County, Alabama (Partial) 1860 Federal Census Montgomery County, Alabama (File 1 Of 5) 1860 Federal Census Montgomery County, Alabama (File 2 Of 5) 1860 Federal Census Montgomery County, Alabama (File 3 Of 5) 1860 Federal Census...

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Montgomery County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Montgomery County, USGenWeb Archives Project Barnette Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Some Inhabitants Of City Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Day Family Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Graves Burying Ground, Montgomery, Alabama Haardt Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Harper Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Howell Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Manning Springs Cemetery McDade Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Dr. Nicholas Lewis Meriwether Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Old Philadelphia Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Tabernacle Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Urquhart Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Ware-Green Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama Wright Cemetery, Montgomery, Alabama...

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Biography of James P. Goodall

JAMES P. GOODALL.- There are some hundreds of men upon our coast whose life experiences embrace as much of romance and adventure as was every told in the pages of Marryat, Irving, or of Smollet. For a full recital of this, we must refer the inquirer to such men as the genial gentleman whose name appears above, that he may in his own home, in the beautiful city of Jacksonville, Oregon, recount as to us the stories of his life upon this coast. He was born at Milledgeville, Georgia, in 1818, and at that city and at Columbus in the same state, and at Montgomery, Alabama, received his education. In 1836-36, while but a youth of seventeen, he began his active career by joining the column under Scott to quiet the Creeks and the Seminole Indians, and, after service there was ended, entered Texas as a revolutionist under Lamar and Houston, serving an active army life from the Sabine to the Rio Grade, and north to the Red River, and the northwest of Texas in the Comanche region. In 1846 the war with Mexico took him with the advance to Wools column to the Mexican borders, to Presidio, Rio Grande, to Monclova, Monterey and other interior towns. At the close of hostilities, having served a whole term, and having experienced several skirmishes and action, he performed an overland trip...

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Biography of J. Q. Chenoweth

Is a native of Kentucky, born in Louisville, in 1841, and raised manhood by his grand-parents, in Harrison County of that state. In 1872, he resigned his seat in the senate of Kentucky to come into this state, and the loss of Kentucky proved the gain of Texas. He came direct to Bonham and opened his Law Office people of North Texas are acquainted with his history from that time. Before he went into public life in Kentucky, he completed a thorough course of study in the law-office of Elmore, Keys & Gunter, at Montgomery, Ala., after which he was admitted to the bar of that and his native state. When the war came on, he enlisted as a private, from which he was gradually promoted to Colonel. A few of the battles in which he took a part, were Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Ringold Gap and Kennesaw Mountain. He represented this county in the 17th and 18th legislatures, and was appointed First Auditor of the U. S. Treasury in 1885. Judge Chenoweth possesses all the qualities of a statesman, jurist and soldier. During his membership of the legislature, be acquired a reputation as an orator and level-headed representative. While on the bench, his fair-mindedness and thorough knowledge of the law, rendered him popular as a judge, mid the chivalry and courage he displayed in many bloody...

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