Location: Monroe County WV

Biographical Sketch of Rev. William N. Nickell

William N. Nickell is a native of Monroe county, West Virginia, was born December 27, 1838, and is the son of John A. and Mary J. Nickell, both natives of West Virginia. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the common schools of Virginia, and completed it by an additional course of two and a half years at the Washington College, now Washington and Lee University, of Rockbridge county, Virginia. In May 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Twenty-seventh Regiment Virginia Confederate Infantry as a private, was soon promoted to sergeant, and sergeant-major of his regiment. He served two and a half years, was then engaged in carrying the Confederate mail until the close of the war. He was at the battles of Manassas, Winchester, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Culpepper Court House, and others. At the close of the war he began farming, and in 1866 moved to Miami county, Kansas, thence in 1869 to this county and settled where he now lives. In 1872 he went under the care of the Chillicothe Presbytery, as a candidate for the ministry in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and was licensed to preach in April, 1873, was ordained in 1875, and the same fall went back to Virginia; was there engaged in the ministry for three years, and then returned to this county. Since that time he has been engaged...

Read More

Slave Narrative of James Campbell

Interviewer: Hallie Miller Person Interviewed: James Campbell Location: Gallipolis, Ohio Place of Birth: Monroe County WV Date of Birth: January 15, 1852 “Well, I’se bo’n Monro’ County, West Virginia, on January 15, 1852, jes’ few miles from Union, West Virginia.” “My mammy wuz Dinnah Alexander Campbell an’ my pappy wuz Levi Campbell an’ dey bof cum frum Monro’ County. Dat’s ’bout only place I heerd dem speak ’bout.” “Der wuz Levi, Floyd, Henry, Noah, an’ Nancy, jes’ my haf brudders an’ sistahs, but I neber knowed no diffrunce but whut dey wuz my sistahs an’ brudders.” “Where we liv? On Marsa John Alexander’s farm, he wuz a good Marsa too. All Marsa John want wuz plenty wurk dun and we dun it too, so der wuz no trubble on ouah plantashun. I neber reclec’ anyone gittin’ whipped or bad treatment frum him. I does ‘members, dat sum de neighbers say dey wuz treated prutty mean, but I don’t ‘member much ’bout it ‘caise I’se leetle den.” “Wher’d I sleep? I neber fergit dat trun’l bed, dat I sleep in. “Marsa John’s place kinda stock farm an’ I dun de milkin’. You all know dat wuz easy like so I jes’ keep busy milkin’ an’ gits out de hard work. Nudder thing I lik to do wuz pick berries, dat wuz easy too, so I dun my shar’ pickin’.” “Money?...

Read More

Biography of John W. Peters

John W. Peters for a number of years had been one of the leading ranchers and stock raisers and dealers in Wabaunsee County. His home is at Eskridge and he had spent the greater part of his active life in that community. Mr. Peters was born in Monroe County, West Virginia, March 2, 1862. His birth occurred after his father died and he was only two or three years old when he was orphaned by the death of his mother. He is of substantial Holland Dutch ancestry. His forefathers came from Holland and were colonial settlers in Pennsylvania. His grandfather, John Peters, was a native of Pennsylvania, and became a pioneer in Monroe County, West Virginia, or Old Virginia as it was then, Poterstown and Peters Mountain in that vicinity were named in his honor. He had a large plantation for the raising of tobacco and other crops and also kept a tavern and was a man of more than ordinary local prominenee. His death occurred at Peterstown. J. A. Peters, father of John W., was born at Peterstown in Monroe County in 1817, and died there in January, 1862. He spent his active life as a farmer, was a democrat, and was a working member of the Missionary Baptist Church. He married Sarah Peck, a sister of Senator Peck of West Virginia. She was born in Monroe County...

Read More

Biography of Walter J. Pack

Walter J. Pack, a prominent figure in business circles in Muskogee, has also been a valuable contributing factor in the educational development of Oklahoma and has left the impress of his ability upon the lives of those who have come under his instruction. He represents a family whose members have largely consecrated their lives. to the spread of the gospel and who have proven most able workers in this great field of usefulness. It was in the capacity of preacher and teacher that Walter J. Pack became a resident of Tahlequah, being appointed head of the Baptist Mission Academy and pastor of the Baptist Church. Since that time his labors have constituted an effective force in promoting material, intellectual and moral progress in the state. The Pack family of which he is a representative was established in America while this country was still numbered among the colonial possessions of Great Britain. His great-grandfather, Samuel Pack, was a planter and slaveholder in Virginia, in which state he died. He had aided in protecting the settlers against the Indians and has contributed to the pioneer development and early progress of the state. He had two children, one of whom, Loami, also devoted his life to the occupation of farming and served his country as a soldier in the Mexican war. He married Polly Lively and they became the parents of ten...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest