Location: Monona County IA

John Wesley Somers

John Wesley Somers, one of Ida Grove’s oldest and distinguished residents, died Saturday morning, August 2, 1919, at the age of 84 years, 8 months, and 15 days. The funeral was held at the late home Monday, in charge of Rev. John T. Pierce. The interment was at the Ida Grove Cemetery. The pall bearers were Charles S. Macomber, W. J. Scott, James E. Easton, B. S. Noble, A. Sykes, and Card Kiner. Mr. Somers was born at Rockford, Surrey County, North Carolina, on November 17, 1834. While still in youth, he moved to Rockford, Illinois, where he met Sarah J. Fitzgerald, and on November 28, 1858, in that city, the ceremony was solemnized by the Rev. Wm. Munhall. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in 1861, and was in the active army service throughout the entire period of the war, three years and 11 months. He was mustered out as First Lieutenant Quartermaster, 76th Illinois Volunteers, on May 15, 1865. He studied pharmacy in Illinois and, upon his return from the army, conducted that business. For 21 years after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Somers lived in Urbana. Then in September, 1879, they moved to Onawa, Ia., and three years later, in June, 1882, they came to Ida Grove, Ia. Here he opened his business as a druggist and pharmacist, a business which has continued...

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Obituary of Susan Little Davis

Susan Little Davis was born June 5, 1848, in Nelson County, Kentucky, and passed away 3 February 1926, aged 77 years, 7 months and 28 days. When she was eight years of age she came with her parents to Hamburg, Iowa, where she lived until her marriage to Richard Davis on 5 October 1863. They lived at Hamburg six years, when they moved to Monona County, which place was their home for ten years. They left Monona County in 1879 and came to Harrison County. This is where this obituary...

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Biography of Alfred Quincy Wooster

Alfred Quincy Wooster. At some time in the life of almost every normal American boy there comes a longing for a “printing outfit.” It is a temporary phase of youth. Sometimes it is satisfied by an indulgent parent who buys a toy press and font of type and the production of a few ink smeared cards is about as far as the son usually gets in mastering the printing trade. Other boys satisfy themselves with work around a real printing office, as a devil, and from this class is recruited some of the real editors and printers of the country. In the case of Alfred Quincy Wooster, now editor and proprietor of the Erie Sentinel, his youthful experience in mastering the printing trade at home turned him to a permanent career. He had spent his early life on an Iowa stock farm. He was well educated, and taught school for a few terms. Then in 1883 he secured the equipment of a job press and some type and other appliances, and at his father’s home in the country, he issued his first three-column folio newspaper, the first copy being dated October 18, 1883. Jannary 16, 1884, his paper was enlarged to a six-column quarto and in October, 1887, the size was increased to a seven-column paper. By 1889 there was a circulation of 2,500. Quoting from an old history...

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