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Location: Mobile Alabama

Biography of Quitman U. Newell, M. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dr. Quitman U. Newell, gynecologist and obstetrician, has followed the tendency of the age. toward specialization and in this branch of the profession has developed wide capability and power, bringing him to a prominent position in the ranks of the medical fraternity in St. Louis. He was born in Whistler, Mobile county, Alabama, June 14, 1886, and is a son of William H. and Minerva A. (Thompson) Newell. The father, a native of Louisiana, belonged to one of the old families of New York of Scotch-Irish descent. He became a pattern-maker by trade and had long followed that pursuit. His people removed from the Empire state to Alabama during the period of the Civil war and William H. Newell continued a resident of the south until his death, which occurred June 13, 1919, when he was sixty-nine years of age. His wife, a native of Mississippi, was of English lineage. She is living at the age of sixty-nine years, making her home in Whistler, Alabama. Dr. Newell, who was the seventh in order of birth in a family of four sons and five daughters, obtained a public school education in his native city and afterward entered Barton Academy at Mobile, while later he began preparation for his professional career as a student in the medical department...

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Mobile Indians

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Mobile Tribe: Meaning unknown, but Halbert (1901) suggests that it may be from Choctaw moeli, “to paddle,” since Mobile is pronounced moila by the Indians. It is the Mabila, Mauilla, Mavila, or Mauvila of the De Soto chroniclers. Mobile Connections. The language of the tribe was closely connected with that of the Choctaw and gave its name to a trade jargon based upon Choctaw or Chickasaw. Mobile Location. When the French settled the seacoast of Alabama the Mobile were living on the west side of Mobile River a few miles below the junction of the Alabama and Tombigbee. Mobile History. When they make their first appearance in history in 1540 the Mobile were between the Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers, and on the east side of the former. Their chief, Tuscaloosa, was a very tall and commanding Indian with great influence throughout the surrounding country. He inspired his people to attack the invading Spaniards and a terrific battle was fought October 18, 1540, for the possession of one of his fortified towns (Mabila), which the Spaniards carried with heavy losses to themselves in killed and wounded, while of the Indians 2,500 or more fell. It is probable that the village of Nanipacna, through which a force of Spaniards of the De Luna colony passed in 1559, was...

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Chatot Indians

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Chatot Tribe. Meaning unknown, but the forms of this word greatly resemble the synonyms of the name Choctaw. Chatot Connections. The language spoken by this tribe belonged, undoubtedly, to the southern division of the Muskhogean stock. Chatot Location. West of Apalachicola River, perhaps near the middle course of the Chipola. (See also Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana). Chatot Villages. From the names of two Spanish missions among them it would appear that there were at least two towns in early times, one called Chacato, after the name of the tribe, and the other Tolentino. Chatot History. The Chatot are first mentioned in a Spanish document of 1639 in which the governor of Florida congratulates himself on having consummated peace between the Chatot, Apalachicola, and Yamasee on one side and the Apalachee on the other. This, he says, “is an extraordinary thing, because the aforesaid Chacatos never maintained peace with anybody.” In 1674 the two missions noted above were established among these people, but the following year the natives rebelled. The disturbance was soon ended by the Spanish officer Florencia, and the Chatot presently settled near the Apalachee town of San Luis, mission work among them being resumed. In 1695, or shortly before, Lower Creek Indians attacked this mission, plundered the church, and carried away 42 Christianized natives....

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Biographical Sketch of Starke Seibert Saffold

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Saffold, Starke Seibert; insurance; born, Mobile, Ala., March 15, 1852; son of Judge Milton J. and Martha Harrison Saffold; educated by private instructor, Graylock and Emerson Institutes; married, Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 1, 1881, Harriet Webb; issue, one daughter, Mrs. Wm. C. Young, of Texas, and one son, J. Webb Saffold, Cleveland; has occupied official position in eight or ten professional and business concerns, from secretary to president; from which since retired; gen. agt., since 1886, Provident Life & Trust Co.; pres. Acme Eng. & Stamps Co.; director Chippewa Lake Co.; Los Seros Copper Co.; Gold Bug Mining Co.; Ohio Lemon Co.; mgr. Union Syndicate; member Cleveland Association Life Underwriters; member Chamber of Commerce; vestryman Church of Epiphany, Woodward Lodge, No. 508, F. & A. M., Cleveland Chapter, No. 148, R. A. M., Oriental Commandery, No. 12, K. T.; member Athletic, Mayfield Country, Cleveland Gun, and La Carp Duck...

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Biography of Joseph Raymond Hampson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JOSEPH RAYMOND HAMPSON – The work in which Joseph Raymond Hampson is engaged is eminently vital and important to the welfare of the people and the progress of the civic body. Mr. Hampson has had wide experience in this general field and has executed many large and important contracts, both for private individuals and for the United States Government. His outstanding success in these various achievements has given his name unusual recognition for a man still looking forward to many years of useful and progressive activity. He is a son of Louis and Viola (Lasher) Hampson, former residents of New York State. Joseph Raymond Hampson was born in Tivolo, Dutchess County, New York, February 5, 1890. His education so far as formal school attendance is concerned, was limited to the elementary school course, which he completed at the age of fifteen years. The technical preparations which fitted him in a minute and comprehensive way for his large responsibilities was secured by exhaustive study under the most discouraging circumstances and without the inspiration and aid of the formal group or the highly specialized instructor. Mr. Hampson is by nature a student and on his very self reliance his success is largely founded. He still constantly studies engineering and construction subjects, both general and special, is particularly interested...

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Tohome Tribe

Tohome Indains. A former Muskhogean tribe of the Gulf coast, speaking a dialect of Choctaw. Their cabins stood 8 leagues north of the French settlement at Mobile, on the west side of Mobile river.

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Tawasa Tribe and Pawokti Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The first reference to the Tawasa is by Ranjel and the Fidalgo of Elvas. Tawasa is mentioned as one of the towns at which the De Soto expedition stopped and is placed between Ulibahali (Holiwa-hali) and Talisi (Tulsa). It is called by Ranjel Tuasi, by Elvas Toasi. 1Bourne, Narr. of De Soto, I, p. 85; II, p. 114. On plates 2 accompanying, Tawasa (1) and Tulsa (1) should be transposed. From this location it is evident that the tribe, or part of it, was at that time among the Upper Creeks, but from Lamhatty’s narrative it appears they had moved southeast before 1706 and settled some where between Apalachicola and Choctawhatchee Rivers. A Spanish letter of 1686 refers to the tribe in one place as “Tauasa,” whose chief was “a very great scoundrel,” in another as Tabara, the last evidently a misprint. 2Serrano y Sans, Doc. Hist., p. 196; also Lowery, MSS. It is impossible to tell from this letter whether the tribe was where De Soto found it or not. In 1706 and 1707, as we know by the Lamhatty document, they were partly destroyed and partly driven away by other Indians. As Lamhatty was himself a Tawasa, and since he represents all of the ten towns to have been Tawasa as well, it will be best to...

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Mobile Tribe and Tohome Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now So far as our information goes, the first white men to have dealings with the Indians of Mobile Bay were probably the Spaniards under Pinedo. Pinedo was sent out by Garay, governor of Jamaica, in the year 1519, to explore toward the north, and he appears to have coasted along the northern shore of the Gulf of Mexico from the peninsula of Florida to Panuco. In the description of this voyage in the Letters Patent we read that after having covered the entire distance “they then turned back with the said ships, and entered a river which was found to be very large and very deep, at the mouth of which they say they found an extensive town, where they remained 40 days and careened their vessels. The natives treated our men in a friendly manner, trading with them, and giving what they possessed. The Spaniards ascended a distance of 6 leagues up the river, and saw on its banks, right and left, 40 villages.” 1Harrisse, Disc, of N. Amer., p. 168. The river referred to is usually identified with the Mississippi, but I am entirely in accord with Mr. Hamilton in finding in it the River Mobile. 2Hamilton, Col. Mobile, p. 10. When first known to us the banks of the Mississippi near the ocean...

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