Location: Milwaukee Wisconsin

Biography of James Porter Greves, M.D.

James Porter Greves, M. D., deceased, was familiarly known as the “Father of Riverside,” and well he deserved the title. He was the real founder of the Colony Association, the first to visit and select the land, and the first to occupy them, camping upon the desert plain now occupied by the city of Riverside, September 19, 1870. For nearly twenty years his life and life’s efforts were intimately interwoven with the history of Riverside and the colony. No man in the community was better known or more universally respected and esteemed than he. His death was sincerely mourned and left many an aching heart among his old friends and associates. Dr. Greves was born in Skaneateles, Onondaga County, New York, September 6, 1810. When a youth he was apprenticed to a printer in Utica, New York, and served four years. In 1828 he began the study of medicine under the tutorship of Dr. Batchelor, a well-known physician of that city, and at the age of twenty-one graduated from the Fairfield Medical College, and commenced the practice of his profession. In 1833 he marred Miss Helen Sandford, a native of Ovid, New York, and moved to Marshall, Michigan; there he followed his profession until the summer of 1845, when he removed to Milwaukee, and followed his profession there until 1859; then he went to St. Louis. Late in the...

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Biography of A. M. Brookes

A. M. BROOKES. – A portrait of Mr. Brookes is placed in this work. The present efficient postmaster of the “Queen City” (Seattle) was born in Galena, Illinois, September 2, 1843, and is the son of Samuel M. and Julia B. (Jones) Brookes. His father was one of the early pioneers of Milwaukee. When our subject was but an infant his parents moved to Chicago, and two years later moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where A.M. was educated at the Milwaukee Academy, and where he resided until August, 1862. When, on the call by President Lincoln for three hundred thousand men, our subject was among the first in his city to respond; and in the above month and year he enlisted in Company K, Twenty-fourth Wisconsin Infantry, under command of Colonel Larrabee, with whom he served for three years. His brigade was the first under the command of General Nelson, and afterwards under General Phil Sheridan until the latter’s removal to the Army of the Potomac. Mr. Brookes never missed a day from the regiment from the time of his enlistment, and during that time took part in many of the most desperate engagements that took place during the war. On the expiration of his term of service, Mr. Brookes came to California to join his parents, who had emigrated to the coast in 1863. On his arrival in San...

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Biography of J. P. Comeford

J.P. COMEFORD. – The original owner and builder of the pretty village of Marysville is a native of Ireland, and was born in 1833. While he was a child, his parents emigrated to Canada, and in 1849 came to the United States, going directly to Wisconsin. They resided first at Milwaukee, and then at Fond du Lac, and seven years later removed still farther west to Minnesota. Here he grew up on a farm, driving cattle and learning all the ins and outs of agriculture. In 1861, when the war broke out, he went to St. Louis and joined an independent company of sappers and miners, who were offering their services to the government. For two years he saw hard service at the front, but upon the outbreak of the Sioux war was detailed by General Grant at Memphis, Tenn., at his own request, to return to Minnesota, where his parents resided, to assist in quelling the ferocious savages who had terrorized the whole state. He went to Fort Snelling; and, on receiving a recruiting commission, he, assisted by George Rubles, raised a company of one hundred and ten men for the First Minnesota Mounted Rangers. While in Minnesota, he was present at the hanging of the forty Sioux at Mankato, who participated in the massacre of the Whites. After the company he assisted in recruiting was sworn in,...

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Biography of J. H. Spines

J. H. Spines. The men who establish, organize and develop successful commercial establishments must possess many qualities out of the ordinary. Their insight into business conditions must be keen and far-reaching, their knowledge of values profound, and their ability to grasp opportunities unlimited. Without industrial and commercial interests no locality progresses, for such enterprises are the very life of a community. The investment and attraction of capital, the employment of labor and the consequent opening of new avenues of endeavor to meet newly created demands, all infuse blood into the veins of a section and endow it with new vigor and strength. That part of West Douglas Avenue, between Main Street and the Arkansas River Bridge, in Wichita, is an excellent example of the above statement. With the location in its midst of an enterprise of the kind mentioned, its business life quickened, new interests were awakened, and it has developed into a prosperous center of the city. The man who is probably principally responsible for this desirable state of affairs is J. H. Spines, proprietor of Spines’ Store and one of the most progressive of the younger generation of business men of Wichita. Mr. Spines was born at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 2, 1884. After his graduation from the public schools, his family was not able to help him further in the way of an education, but the youth...

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Biography of A. H. Johnson

Few American cities can furnish so many instances where men have accumulated large fortunes simply by well directed labor, however adverse the circumstances which surrounded their early struggles, than Portland. The subject of this sketch is a striking example of the truth of this statement. Arriving in Portland some thirty odd years ago, without friends or money, but possessed of good health and plenty of pluck and energy, he has steadily pushed onward and upward until today he occupies a prominent place among the leading business men of the city. He was born in London, in 1830, and is the third among eleven sons and daughters of Richard and Mercy Johnson. His father was a butcher, but on coming to America, in 1843, settled on a farm in Waukesha County, Wisconsin, where, with his family, he continued to live until 1869, when he came to Portland, and resided with the subject of this sketch until his death in 1871. Young Johnson had but little chance for gaining an education, a short period of instruction in the public schools of London completing his opportunities in this direction. Although he was but thirteen years old when he left London, he had become very familiar with that great city and he still retains the most vivid recollections of his early home. After the family came to Wisconsin, he assisted his father in...

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