Location: Milton Pennsylvania

Biographical Sketch of Charles W. Goodlander

Charles W. Goodlander was an able and large hearted business man, and among other tributes to his benevolence is the Home for Children which he founded at Fort Scott. He was a Pennsylvanian of English-Quaker ancestry, born at Milton, April 25, 1834. He obtained a partial high school education and mastered and followed the carpenter’s trade in Ponnsylvania, Maryland, Indiana, Illinois and Missouri, before deciding to venture west of the Mississippi in his search for a location. Finally, in April, 1857, he arrived at Fort Scott, the first passenger to come from Kansas City by stage coach. Mr. Goodlander at once established himself at that point as a contractor and builder, in which line he continued with success for twelve years. Subsequently he became interested in the lumber trade, a large brick yard and other enterprises. The panie of 1873 much reduced the value of his properties, and in 1876 his mill and elevator were almost destroyed by a boiler explosion. He then retrieved his fortune by returning to his old business of building and contrasting, bought back his mill property and suffered a heavy loss by fire in 1887. The mill was rebuilt. For some time he was also president of the Citizens’ National Bank, and operated the Goodlandor Hotel. He invested in grain elevators, the manufacture of yellow pine and a variety of other enterprises. In 1901...

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Biography of Daniel M. Sechler

Daniel M. Sechler, founder of the D. M. Sechler Carriage Company, of Moline, Illinois, was born March 4, 1818, at Danville, Pennsylvania, and died at his home in Cincinnati, Ohio, May 27, 1903. Mr. Sechler’s forefathers, in the days of the persecution of John Huss, were obliged to flee for refuge from Austria, taking up their abode in Holland, from which country, in 1685, Mr. Sechler’s great great grandfather emigrated to America, locating near William Penn’s town of Philadelphia. His grandson, John Sechler, a revolutionary soldier, founded the town of Danville, the birthplace not only of the subject of this sketch, but also of his father, Rudolph Sechler, and his mother, Susannah (nee Douty). His wife’s parents were Thomas and Catharine (nee Angstadt) Mackey. Mr. and Mrs. Sechler had but one son, Thomas M:, whose biographical sketch follows this one. Daniel M. Sechler’s early education was acquired in the public schools, of his native town, supplemented by several terms in the local academy. At seventeen years of age he began his apprenticeship at the carriage maker’s trade, in the City of Port Deposit, Maryland. Four years later he entered into a copartnership with a Mr. Ball, under the firm name of Ball & Sechler, Carriage Manufacturers, at Milton, Pennsylvania. During this period Mr. Ball died. Mr. Sechler continued the business for three years thereafter, producing from fifty to seventy-five...

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Biography of Thomas M. Sechler

Moline is a city of manufacturers, one of the most prominent of whom is the subject of this sketch, Thomas M. Sechler. He was born October 25, 1841, in Milton, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, at which place his father, D. M. Sechler, at that time conducted a carriage factory. His father, Daniel Montgomery Sechler, was born at Danville, Pennsylvania, March 4, 1818, and his mother, Pamela (Mackey) Sechler, was born in Rutland Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, December 19, 1819. She is still living at her home in Cincinnati, Ohio. T. M. Sechler’s paternal great-great-great grandfather came from Holland in 1685, together with a brother, and settled in William Penn’s territory near Philadelphia. The brother settled in North Carolina, and one hundred and seventy-eight years later the descendants of these two brothers were to be found in the ranks of the opposing armies in the war of the Rebellion. The great-grandfather, John Sechler, born March 20, 1739, died December 21, 1831, was a soldier in the American army during the Revolution, from 1776 to 1778. He was born in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, and after the close of the Revolutionary war he moved to Columbia County in the same State, where he founded the town of Danville, now the county seat of Montour County. Mr. Sechler’s maternal grandmother, Susannah (Douty) Sechler, was born April 27, 1781, and died September 8, 1871. She...

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Biography of Hon. James Kerr Kelly

HON. JAMES KERR KELLY. – Among the men of distinction in our state, none have held a position of eminence for a longer time than Senator Kelly. It requires stamina to stand for thirty years upon “the hard and wintry peaks of fame.” We are the more assured of eminent qualities of the Colonel when we consider that he came to this coast and started upon bed-rock. Family ties, name, favoritism, may elevate men of no ability to high positions in older communities; but in the Oregon of an early day artificial conditions did not exist. A man came near being born again, or returning to his naked abilities, when he came to the Pacific coast. Of the men of power in our state, – Baker, Nesmith, Woods, Williams, Logan, Mallory, Lane, Applegate, – none have shown more mental grip and wear than Colonel Kelly. But the simple tale of his life carries with it its own commentary. Merit and service may go without veneer. He was born on a farm in Center county, Pennsylvania, in 1819. His was an old American family, although his great-grandfather came from the north of Ireland about 1720. His grandfather served in the Revolutionary war. Young James began his school-days at Milton, and thence went to Princeton College, graduating in 1839. He immediately began the study of law with Judge John Reed of...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. William H. Park

Dr. Park is a son of John and Elizabeth (Waggoner) Park, and was born January 8th, 1825, at Milton, Pennsylvania. When he was about six years of age his parents moved to Tiffin, Ohio. He was educated at Tiffin and at the Wesleyan University, at Delaware, Ohio. In the spring of 1855 he graduated from Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia. He was appointed resident physician at the alms house of the city of Baltimore, Md., but soon after returned to Tiffin, Ohio. In August, 1862, he was commissioned as surgeon of the 49th Ohio Regiment, Col. W. H. Gibson. He was mustered out at Victoria, Texas, in Nov. 1865. He was at the battle of Shiloh, Stone River, Liberty Gap and Chickanaauga. He was captured and taken to Atlanta, and afterwards confined at Libby Prison and at Andersonville. Afterward he was at the battle of Nashville and went with the army to San Antonio, Texas. In May, 1866, he came to Greene county, Missouri, and settled upon Leeper prairie, near Bois D’Arc, and was one of the first to settle upon that celebrated prairie after the war. He followed his profession and at one time owned about seven hundred acres of land. He came to Springfield in September, 1881. He is now of the firm of T. E. Crank & Co., druggists, of North Springfield, and at Golden City....

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