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Location: Middletown Connecticut

American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Among the well known educational institutions in our land during the early part of the past century, was the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy, the forerunner of Norwich University, founded by the late Capt. Alden Partridge in 1819, in Norwich, his native town. The corner-stone of the Academy building 1This building was constructed of brick, was four stories high and forty-seven by one hundred feet on the ground, and was situated just south of the present high school building, and near the east end of the now vacant lot opposite the residence of Mrs. William E. Lewis. was placed August 4, 1819, and September 20th of the following year the institution was opened for the reception of cadets. From Captain Partridge‘s knowledge of the system of education in force in the higher seminaries of learning in our country, he was convinced that no truly American system of education, such as was designed to meet the needs of the large majority of the young men of the country, was within their reach. It was with a view to remedy that defect that he established this institution, which during the first year of its existence had an attendance of one hundred pupils, and thereafter, until 1825 the annual attendance rapidly increased, at one time being nearly two...

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Hardships of the Early Natchez Emigrants

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Taking the reader with us, to the settlements of the distant Natchez region, he will find that emigrants continued to pour in, upon those fertile hills and alluvial bottoms, from all parts of “his majesty’s Atlantic plantations.” Many were the hardships and perils they encountered, in reaching this remote and comparatively uninhabited region. It is believed that the history of one party of these emigrants will enable the reader to understand what kind of hardships and deprivations all the others were forced to undergo. Major General Phineas Lyman, a native of Durham, a graduate of Yale, a distinguished lawyer, and a member of the legislature of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, became commander of the Connecticut forces in 1755. He served with so much distinction, during the Canadian war, that he was invited, by persons high in office, to visit England. He had formed an association composed of his brothers in arms, called the “Military Adventurers,” whose design was, the colonization of a tract of country upon the Mississippi. He sailed to England, as agent for this company, with the sanguine, yet reasonable hope, that the King would make the grant. Arriving there he found, to his astonishment, that land in a wilderness was refused to those who had fought so valiantly for it, and whose contemplated...

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Biography of Paul Helmer Young

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Paul Helmer Young, representative of the bond department of the National Bank of Commerce at St. Louis and president of the St. Louis Junior Chamber of Commerce, is one of the most alert, wide-awake and progressive of the young business men of the city. He was born in Lander, Wyoming, July 26, 1896. He is therefore a western man by birth, training and experience and has always been possessed by the spirit of western enterprise and progress which has been the dominant element in the upbuilding of the great empire beyond the Mississippi. His father, the Rev. Benjamin Young, is pastor of the Union Methodist Episcopal church of St. Louis and is mentioned elsewhere in this work. Paul H. Young was educated in the Lincoln high school at Portland, Oregon, also in the Topeka high school at Tokepa, Kansas, from which he was graduated with the class of 1915, and in the Wesleyan University at Middletown, Connecticut. While a student there he enlisted for service in the European war and became a second lieutenant of infantry in the Sixty-third Pioneer Infantry, which was stationed at Camp Dix, New Jersey, where be received his discharge in December, 1918, following the signing of the armistice. From January until May, 1919, he was general secretary of the University of...

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Biography of John B. West

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John B. West, the register of the land office, at Lewiston, was born in Leicester, North Carolina, July 31, 1861. The family to which he belongs is of English origin and its founders in America became residents of the south in colonial days and participated in the development of that part of the country, taking part in many of the events which go to form its history. Erwin West, the father of our subject, was a native of North Carolina and married Miss Caroline Dover, who was likewise born in that state. They had a family of fifteen children, eleven of whom are now living. The mother departed this life in 1898, at the age of sixty-seven years, but the father still resides on the old homestead, highly respected throughout the entire countryside where he has so long continued his residence. He owned an extensive plantation, and while not a slave-owner or a believer in slavery neither was he an abolitionist. His neighbors were slaveholders and he was willing that they should keep them, as he could see no feasible plan for doing away with the system. When the country became engaged in civil war, he was opposed to the severance of the Union, but such was the excitement and such was the pressure brought to...

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Biographical Sketch of William Andrew Leonard, Rt. Rev. D. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Leonard, William Andrew, Rt. Rev. D. D.; Bishop of Ohio; born, Southport, Connecticut, July 15, 1848; educated, Philips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, St. Stephen’s College, Annadale, N. Y., and Berkley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn.; ordained May 31, 1871, degrees of D. D. from St. Stephen’s College, and Washington and Lee University, Virginia; Rector the Church of the Redeemer, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1872-1880; St. John’s Parish, Washington, D. C., 1880-1889; consecrated Bishop of Ohio, Oct. 12, 1889; in charge of the American Episcopal churches on the continent of Europe, 1897-1906; one of the founders of the University Club; Chaplain Ohio Society of New York; pres. Board of Trustees of Kenyon College; trustee University school; member General Board of Civic Federation of Cleveland, and the Society of Sons of Colonial...

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Chloe Todd Tuttle of Middletown CT

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now TUTTLE, Chloe Todd5, (Titus4, Benjamin3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Jan. 26, 1763, died in 1810, married first Samuel, son of Samuel and Sarah (Humiston) Tuttle, who was born in 1759, died July 9, 1802; killed by falling from a load of hay and was run over. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. They lived in Middletown, Conn., until his death, when soon afterwards, his widow removed to North Haven, Conn., and married second(???) Granniss. Children: I. Sally, b. Sept. 15, 1787, d. Oct. 18, 1864, m. Oct. 4, 1813, William Way, who d. July 30, 1868. They lived in Colesville, Broome County, N. Y. II. Edward, b. in New Haven, Conn., d. in Tooele City, Utah, July 1867, m. Sally Clinton. III. Lyman, b. June 15, 1790, in North Haven, Ct., m. Martha, Dau. of Jude Tuttle, who was b. Mar. 7, 1794, in Rowe, Mass. They lived in Hartford, Ct. IV. Maria, m. Daniel Todd; they had issue: (1) Cornelia; (2) Chloe; (3) Samuel; (4) Edward. V. Samuel, b. June 7, 1795, d. Dec. 12, 1834, of sunstroke at Baiou Barou Chunneville, La., m. Lucille Thorpe, who afterwards m. second(???)Burr, of New Haven, Conn. He was a carriage maker in New Haven, Ct., until 1832, when he removed to Louisiana, where he worked at...

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Leonard Enos Todd of Oakville CT

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Leonard Enos Todd9, (Dwight E.8, Leonard7, Ely6, Jonah5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born May 10, 1880, in Woodbridge, New Haven County, Conn., baptised Nov. 24, 1881, in Christ Church Parish, Bethany, Conn., married May 24, 1917, Grace Lavinia Ingraham, in Christ Church, Bethany, the same Parish Church where he had been baptised, confirmed and ordained. He received his early education in the district schools of Woodbridge. Prepared for college at Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, Conn., from which he graduated in 1900. Graduated from Yale in 1906. Entered Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn., in the Fall of 1906 and graduated in 1909. Was ordained Deacon in the Episcopal Church by Bishop Brewster, June 2, 1909, in the Church of the Holy Trinity, Middletown, Conn. Was ordained Priest in Christ Church, Bethany, Conn., by Bishop Brewster, of Conn., Sept. 19, 1910. From Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1911 he was Curate in church of the ascension, Fall River, Mass. On Sept. 15, 1911 he took up the work in Oakville, Conn., at that time being a mission under St. Johns Church, Waterbury, Conn. After having been there for a few years, the mission became an independent parish and he became its first Rector, it being named All Saints Church. Since 1911 he has resided in Oakville,...

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Biographical Sketch of E. P. Clarke

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now E. P. Clarke is the senior member of the firm of Clarke Brothers, publishers of the Ontario Record, and is also the editor of the paper. He is a native of the State of Maine and reared and educated in that State, closing his educational career in Kent’s Hill (Maine) Seminary and the Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, graduating at the latter institution with high honors in 1885. He then was engaged for some months on the United States geological survey in Maine and New Hampshire. In October 1885, he came to California and located at Ontario, and in December of the same year established the journal he has since so successfully edited and conducted. Mr. Clarke is one of the progressive men of Ontario, to whom much of its prosperity is due, and has ever taken an active part in all enterprises tending to advance the interests of his chosen city. He is a member of the San Bernardino County Board of Education, and secretary of the Board of Regents of the Chaffey College, and during 1888-’89 filled the chair of Latin and English literature in that institution. He is a member of the Republican County Central Committee and has been secretary of the same. Mr. Clarke is a contributor to the Overland Monthly and Pacific...

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Biography of Chauncey P. Williams

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now CHAUNCEY P. WILLIAMS AMONG the noted men of Albany Chauncey P. Williams stands in the front rank as a banker and financier. He is a native of Connecticut – a state which has furnished so many of the enterprising pioneers of our own and other states of the Union. He was born at Upper Middletown (now Cromwell), Conn., on the 5th of March, 1817, the son of Josiah and Charity Shaler Williams. His early years were spent upon his father’s farm, where in summer his physical powers were trained to healthful development by the labors of the farm, and his winters occupied in mental culture at the common school. He early developed a taste for mathematics and astronomy, and probably would have devoted his life to those sciences, but for the fact that circumstances made it imperative that he must earn his own way in the world. At the age of sixteen he accepted a clerkship with his brothers, the firm of T. S. Williams & Brothers, then engaged in extensive commercial business at Ithaca, N. Y.  He remained at Ithaca two years, when in 1835 he was transferred to the Albany house of the same firm, then under the direction of Josiah B. Williams. In 1839 he succeeded to the business of the Albany house,...

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Mattabesec Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Mattabesec Indians (from massa-sepuēs-et, ‘at a [relatively] great rivulet or brook. Trumbull). An important Algonquian tribe of Connecticut, formerly occupying both banks of Connecticut river from Wethersfield to Middletown or to the coast and extending westward indefinitely. The Wongunk, Pyquaug, and Montowese Indians were apart of this tribe. According to Ruttenber they were a part of the Wappinger, and perhaps occupied the original territory from which colonies went out to overrun the country as far as Hudson river. The same author says their jurisdiction extended over all south west Connecticut, including the Mahackeno, Uncowa, Paugusset, Wepawaug, Quinnipiac, Montowese, Sukiang, and...

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Biographical Sketch of John Collins

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (II) John (2), son of John (1) Collins, was born in Boston, about 1644. He was also a shoemaker. He removed in 1663 to Middletown, Connecticut, thence to Saybrook, later to Branford and Guilford. He married (first) Mary Trowbridge, who died in 1668; (second), June 3, 1669, Mary (Stephens) Hingnoth, widow of Henry Hingnoth; (third) Dorcas (Swain) Taintor, widow of John Taintor. He died at Branford about 1704. Children: John, born 1665, mentioned elsewhere; Robert, 1667; Mary, married...

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Biographical Sketch of Jay F. Neal

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Jay F. Neal, dealer in groceries and provisions, Charleston; was born in Tuftonborough, Carroll Co., N. H., June 24, 1835; he is a son of Nathaniel Neal, a farmer of that town; his early life was passed in farm labor among the granite hills, but at the age of 19 years he went to Great Falls, and engaged in teaching just across the river in New Berwick Me.; he continued teaching during a portion of the year for twelve years. He graduated at the New Hampshire Conference Seminary at Tilton, N. H., in 1859, and entered the Sophomore class of the Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn. At the end of a year, however, his health becoming impaired, and an opportunity presenting itself to engage in teaching in the South, he left college, and, going to Bourbon Co., Ky., taught in the Millersburg high school until 1861. He then came to Charleston and taught two years in the public schools, after which he engaged in clerking for Henry Weiss in the hardware business, and afterward as bookkeeper for the Charleston Woolen-Mill, engaging in his present business in 1870. He was married by the Rev. W. B. Anderson on the 25th of March, 1863, to Miss Sarah E. Blakeman, of Charleston Tp., a daughter of Even Blakeman, now...

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