Location: Memphis Tennessee

Biography of Capt. John Burgess Davis

When the great West was young the Mississippi River, as the principal gateway to it and almost the sole means of conveying its products to the out-side world was the center of commercial life. Men who followed the river were participants in stirring events and their work was fraught with an importance in the eyes of the public that we of today can little realize. To be a steamboat captain in the fifties and sixties invested the individual with a dignity as great as that accorded to the average railroad magnate nowadays. Captain John Burgess Davis earned his title when the great stream was at its best, and there were few who won greater honors than he for his calling. Among his most notable achievements was the taking of the first boat up the Minnesota River to Big Stone Lake; thence into the Red River of the North, and the construction of the first wing dam on the Mississippi. The boat he took into the Red River was the “Freighter.” It was in 1859 that he navigated through Big Stone Lake into the Northern stream. The first wing dam was built some years later, in 1873, when he was in charge of a Government fleet, and it was located three miles below St. Paul, at Pig’s Eye Island. This method of improvement, which he was the first to use...

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Biography of Samuel Sharpe Davis

In considering those among Rock Island’s citizens whose activities have been directed toward developing that city’s industries, and whose foresight has been rewarded in a most substantial manner, one’s mind instinctively turns to the subject of our present sketch, Samuel Sharpe Davis. He was born February 1, 1858, at Covington, Kentucky, his parents being John, B. and Anna E. (Sharpe) Davis. To this couple three children were born: Thomas B., Samuel S. and Mary. The parents were of Scotch-Irish origin. Thomas Bodley Davis, the paternal grandfather was a native of Pennsylvania. In early life he moved to Kentucky, and for some years served as captain of a steam boat plying between Pittsburg and New Orleans on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. Upon one of the trips up river from New Orleans he was stricken with yellow fever, and died before the completion of the journey. At the time of his death he was thirty-four years of age. The maternal grandfather, Samuel K. Sharpe, was a native of Kentucky. He was a practicing physician and surgeon. The greater part of his life was spent in Maysville, Kentucky. He removed to Rock Island with his wife in 1875. Her death occurred in 1881 at the age of seventy-six years. Her husband survived her nine years, his death occurring in Rock Island in 1890, at the extreme age of ninety years. Dr....

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McKenzie, Huela Van Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Huela Van McKenzie, 79, of Baker City, died Dec. 27, 2005, at St. Elizabeth Health Care Center. A memorial service will be scheduled later. Huela was born on Feb. 11, 1926, at Plant City, Fla., to Hulon and Gladys Hamilton Van. After graduating from high school, she attended Florida Southern College at Lakeland, Fla., where she studied music. In June 1948, she married Robert McKenzie at Memphis, Tenn. They moved to Pendleton in 1950. She was a housewife and the mother of five children. Huela later worked in Portland as a receptionist at Physicians and Surgeons Hospital and as a clerical specialist for Adult Family Services. She enjoyed playing the piano and organ, sewing and cooking. She was a member of the Oriental Shrine in Pendleton. She was also a member of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church at Baker City. Huela was a devout Christian who took Holy Communion every other day while attending chapel services at the care center. The Episcopal Church also gave her Holy Communion frequently. Survivors include her daughters, Barbara Heiple of John Day, Linda Witherrite of Hillsboro and Kathy McClure of Pendleton; her sons, Randall McKenzie of Pendleton and Ronald McKenzie of Dayton, Wash.; and seven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church through Driskill Memorial Chapel, 241 S. Canyon Blvd., John Day,...

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Biographical Sketch of S. E. Ray

S. E. Ray, dealer in dry and fancy goods, boots and shoes, etc., Charleston; was born near Montpelier, Vt., Aug. 5, 1833; in early childhood, he accompanied his parents to Geauga Co. (now Lake), Ohio; there, his father resided until his death, and his mother still resides there; at about the age of 20 years, Mr. Ray went to La Fayette, Ind., and engaged as a traveling salesman for Luce Brothers in the stationery business; and, after remaining with them four years, went to Chicago, and for about six years traveled for the well-known stationery house of Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co., establishing the Memphis branch of that house, under the name of C. H. Chamberlain & Co., which continued until after the breaking-out of the war; in 1862, he returned to Chicago, and the following year came to Charleston and engaged in the livery business; in 1875, he disposed of his business, and engaged in merchandising. Mr. Ray was married March 31, 1863, to Miss Josephine Bunnell, of Charleston; she died Sept. 18, 1867, leaving one child-Henrietta, since deceased. He was married again Dec. 10, 1867, to Mrs. Elizabeth J. Willhoit, of Edgar Co., Ill., and has one child -Samuel A. Mr. Ray is President of the Board of Education of Charleston, of which he has been a member for the .past two years, and has served two...

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Biography of Capt. George M. Jones

Capt. Jones is the son of Henry F. and Mary (Waller) Jones, and was born in Shelby county, Tennessee, Oct. 19th, 1836.His father is still living there, aged eighty-one. His mother died in l856. George M. grew up on the farm, receiving his education at the common schools of the county where he lived. At the age of seventeen he went to Memphis, Tenn., and sold dry goods for the firm of Cossitt, Hill & Talmadge. He remained with them something over three years, receiving for his first year’s service, $75.00 and board; for the second, $100.00, and the third, $150.00. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in January, 1858, but went back to Tennessee after a short time. In the fall of the same, year he returned to Springfield and engaged in the general merchandising business, the firm being Miller, Jones & Co. He only remained here a year when be went to Dillon, Phelps county, Missouri, and embarked in the forwarding and commission business, which he carried on until the war broke out in 1861. In June of that year he enlisted as a private, in Capt. Dick Campbell’s company of Independence, Mo. State service, in the interest of the South. He was next transferred to Foster’s regiment, Company A, McBride’s division, C. S. A. He was shortly afterward made quartermaster, with the rank of captain. On account...

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