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Location: McIntosh County OK

Biography of Hon. William M. Duffy

Hon. William M. Duffy, attorney at law in Checotah and now serving his first term as justice of the peace, was born in Callaway County, Missouri, on the 21st of August, 1866, a son of Mathew and Caroline (Ellis) Duffy. The father was born in Ireland and came to America when a young man, locating in Missouri, where he engaged in farming. He followed agricultural pursuits the remainder of his life and died in 1874, one of the prominent and representative citizens of the community in which he resided. Mrs. Duffy was born in Missouri and her death occurred in 1872. In the acquirement of an education William M. Duffy attended the common schools of Callaway County, Missouri, and later enrolled in Westminster College at Fulton, where he remained for two years. He then taught school for four years in Kansas and served as County clerk of Harper County, that state, in 1891, being reelected in 1893. During that time he studied law and in 1896 was admitted to the bar. In the same year he located in Point Pleasant, West Virginia, for the practice of his chosen profession and he resided there until 1906, in which year he came to Checotah. In the intervening years he has built up a large and lucrative practice, handling much important litigation before the courts and he has taken an active part...

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Biography of Clark Nichols

Clark Nichols, attorney at law in Eufaula and a member of the State senate from McIntosh, Muskogee and Haskell counties, was born in Elk County, Kansas, on the 16th of November, 1880, a son of John A. and Mary C. (Conover) Nichols, both natives of Illinois. The father removed to Kansas at an early age and acquiring land in Elk County, farmed there until 1889, in which year he, removed to Joplin, Missouri. There he engaged in mining but in 1911 he disposed of his interests and came to Hanna, Oklahoma. He bought land near here, which he still operates. Both Mr. and Mrs. Nichols are living in Eufaula and are respected citizens of the community. In the acquirement of an education, Clark Nichols attended the schools of Elk County and Cherryvale, Kansas, and later those in Joplin, Missouri. For some time he followed mining there, and then, determining upon a legal career, enrolled in the law department of the University of Missouri in 1903. In 1906 he was graduated from that institution, with the LL. B. degree. Subsequently he engaged in practice in Joplin and from 1907 to 1909 held the office of city attorney there. In January, 1911, he came to Oklahoma, locating in Holdenville and after practicing there for two years removed to Hanna. He remained in Hanna until 1916, when he came to Eufaula and...

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Biography of James M. Wood

A representative citizen of McIntosh County is James M. Wood, who since 1921 has been Mayor of Checotah. He was born in Crawford County, Arkansas, on the 13th of December, 1861, a son of James M. and Sophronia (Clyman) Wood. The father was born near Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1825, while Mrs. Wood was born in Danville, Illinois, on the 3d of January, 1834. Mr. Wood emigrated from his native state to Van Buren, Arkansas, at an early age and for some time followed farming. Subsequently he engaged in the general mercantile business and he was active along that line until his demise on the 15th of December, 1881, at the age of fifty-seven years. Mrs. Wood died on the 31st of October, 1921, in her eighty-eighth year. James M. Wood was reared and received his education in Van Buren, Arkansas. He remained with his parents on the home place until he became of age, when he accepted a position as clerk in a store in Van Buren. He was thus employed for several years but finally resigned to become traveling salesman for a large local concern. In June, 1901, he came to Checotah to take charge of the shoe department for the firm of Spaulding & Hutchinson and he remained in that capacity for two or three years, at the termination of which time he again went on the...

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Biography of Robert Britton Buford

The present mayor of Eufaula, Dr. Robert Britton Buford, was for ten years engaged in the practice of dentistry here and he is now, in connection with his official duties, active in the conduct of the Indian Journal, of which paper he is editor and proprietor. A native of Texas, he was born in Sulphur Springs, on the 23d of April, 1879, a son of John C. and Elizabeth (Askew) Buford, the former a native of Texas and the latter of Georgia. On attaining manhood the father engaged in farming on his own account in Texas and he was active in that connection until his demise in 1920. He was but eighteen years of age when he enlisted in the Texas infantry under his father, Captain W. R. Buford, for service in the Civil war, and he participated in many of the most important battles of that conflict, serving the entire four years. After receiving his honorable discharge he returned to his native state and resided there until his death at the age of seventy-eight years. Mrs. Buford is still living and makes her home in Texas. Robert Britton Buford was reared and educated in Sulphur Springs, Texas, and after completing his preliminary education, enrolled in the dental department of the University of Tennessee at Nashville, graduating from that institution in 1902 with the D. D. S. degree. He...

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Thompson, Shirley Eugene – Obituary

Island City, Oregon Stanley Eugene Thompson, 59, of Island City, died from unexpected natural causes on Aug. 24 at a hospital in Boise. A celebration of life at the Island City School will begin at 6 p.m. Sunday. He was born in Arcata, Calif., on Aug. 11, 1947 to Ana Mae (Posey) and Glen Thompson. He was raised and educated in Oakland, Calif., and Eufaula, Okla. Mr. Thompson enlisted in the Navy in April of 1965. After his naval service, he moved to Government Camp and helped his father cook at the Huckleberry Inn Restaurant. He greatly enjoyed his work for the Forest Service and as a maintenance technician at Gresham Hospital. He married Lynne on Sept. 1, 1979 in Portland. Mr. Thompson went to work for the City of Island City and worked there for 21 years. He retired for medical reasons. Mr. Thompson loved to hunt and fish and most of all he loved to entertain, especially cooking for large groups of friends and family. He and his wife recently purchased their “dream retirement job,” The Hells Canyon Inn in Pine Creek. This place was conveniently located close to his favorite place to be — “at his cabin.” He is survived by his wife of La Grande; sons, Mitchell Thompson of Pine Creek, Graham Pinard, of McCall, Idaho, and Andrew Pinard of Pine Creek; daughter, Stacy Miller...

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Bowman, Gene C. “Smokey” – Obituary

Gene C. “Smokey” Bowman, 76, of Baker City, died March 9, 2005, at his home after a year-long battle with cancer. His wife and children were at his side. His memorial was at 1 p.m. today at Gray’s West & Co. Pioneer Chapel. Pastor Lennie Spooner of the First Church of the Nazarene officiated. Interment was at Mount Hope Cemetery at the foot of his granddaughter Sophia’s grave. Gene was born Sept. 10, 1928, at Checotah, Okla., to Floyd and Maude Bowman. The family moved to the Gooding, Idaho, area where Gene attended school until he was 15, when he enlisted in the U.S. Navy. After his time in the service, he worked on many ranches in Idaho and Nevada — always a top hand among the crew. He began to rodeo at an early age and won his first buckle in bull riding at Bliss, Idaho. He spent many years following rodeo in bull riding, saddle bronc riding and bulldogging. He was a pretty fair team roper, too. Gene owned his own airplane and would fly over the family ranch and knock the tops out of the cottonwood trees to tell the family to pick him up at the airport. He also owned and operated several bars and restaurants over the years. Gene married Betty Woods and they had three children: Becky, Dave and Brad. They later divorced....

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Okchai Tribe

Like the Pakana, Adair includes the Okchai among those tribes which had been ”artfully decoyed” to unite with the Muskogee, 1Adair, Hist. Am. Inds., p. 257. and Milfort says that the Okchai and Tuskegee had sought the protection of the Muskogee after having suffered severely at the hands of hostile Indians. He adds that the former “mounted ten leagues toward the north [of the confluence of the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers] and fixed their dwelling in a beautiful plain on the bank of a little river.” 2Milfort, Mémoire, p. 267. Among some of the living Okchai there seems to be a tradition of this foreign origin, but nowhere do we find evidence that they spoke a diverse language. Their tongue may have been a dialect of Muskogee assimilated to the current speech in very ancient times. This tribe appears on some of the earliest maps which locate Creek towns, such as that of Popple. 3Plate 4. Their original seats were, as described by Milfort, on the western side of the Coosa some miles above its junction with the Tallapoosa. By 1738, however, a part of them had left that region and moved over upon a branch of Kialaga Creek, an affluent of the Tallapoosa. 4MS., Ayer Lib. Another portion evidently remained for a time near their old country, since the census of 1761 mentions “Oakchoys opposite the said [i. e.,...

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Hilibi Tribe

We now come to three towns or groups of towns —Hilibi, Eufaula, and Wakokai— which, while they have had a long separate existence, claim and in recent years have maintained terms of the closest intimacy. Their square grounds are much the same and they generally agree in selecting their chief from the Aktayatci clan. It is possible that this points to a common origin at some time in the remote past; but it would be hazardous to suggest it in stronger terms. From one of the best-informed Hilibi Indians I obtained the following tradition regarding the origin of his town. It was, he said, founded by a Tukpafka Indian belonging to the Aktayatci clan. Having suffered defeat in a ball game he determined to leave his own people, so he went away and founded another, gathering about him persons from many towns, but especially from Tukabahchee. When the people began to discuss what name they should give to their settlement their leader said ”Quick shall be my name,” and that is what Hilibi (hilikbi) signifies. It was because it grew up so rapidly. This story was confirmed independently by another of the best-informed old men, except that he represented the town as built up entirely of Tukpafka Indians. Tukpafka was, however, only a branch, and probably a late branch, of Wakokai, therefore we should have to look for an...

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Eufaula Tribe

The Eufaula tribe was an independent body as far back as history takes us. According to one of my informants they branched off from Kealedji, while another seemed to think that they originated from Hilibi. Practically no confidence can be placed in these opinions. Not even a plausible guess can be furnished by the living Indians regarding the origin of the name.

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